Sinclair to sell 7 TV stations to Fox to win regulatory OK


Staff and wire reports



FILE - In thisOct. 12, 2004, file photo, Sinclair Broadcast Group, Inc.'s headquarters stands in Hunt Valley, Md.  Media company Twenty-First Century Fox is buying seven TV stations from Sinclair Broadcast Group for $910 million.
The move comes as Sinclair is selling some stations to meet regulatory approval for its pending $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media.     (AP Photo/Steve Ruark, File)

FILE - In thisOct. 12, 2004, file photo, Sinclair Broadcast Group, Inc.'s headquarters stands in Hunt Valley, Md. Media company Twenty-First Century Fox is buying seven TV stations from Sinclair Broadcast Group for $910 million. The move comes as Sinclair is selling some stations to meet regulatory approval for its pending $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark, File)


NEW YORK (AP) — Media company Twenty-First Century Fox has agreed to buy seven TV stations from Sinclair Broadcast Group for $910 million.

The move comes as Sinclair is selling some stations to meet regulatory approval for its pending $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media. Meanwhile, Disney is pursuing a $52 billion takeover of much of Fox, though TV stations will stay with Rupert Murdoch’s family under a new Fox company.

Two of the Sinclair stations are in California (Sacramento, San Diego), and the rest are in Colorado (Denver), Florida (Miami), Ohio (Cleveland), Utah (Salt Lake City) and Washington (Seattle).

Fox said the deal will let it compete in 19 of the top 20 markets, with a larger presence in the West.

In April, Sinclair agreed to sell nine TV stations to Standard Media Group for $442 million.

Both Sinclair deals are contingent on the acquisition of Tribune Media closing. The Fox deal is expected to close in the second half of the year.

Sinclair received widespread attention after news reports in April showed dozens of Sinclair news anchors reading an identical script expressing concern about “one-sided news stories plaguing the country.” At the time, President Donald Trump tweeted his support of the network.

Michelle Wolf got it just right

By Molly Roberts April 29

The Washington Post

“Thank you!”

That’s how comedian Michelle Wolf answered Sean Spicer’s declaration that her headlining stand-up set at the the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner was “a disgrace.” Her response is instructive: To Wolf, an insult from Spicer is an accolade – and accolades, surely, would be an insult. She’s right.

Wolf managed Saturday night to scandalize the majority of Washington’s tuxedo-clad intelligentsia with a barrage of bon mots that, in the eyes of much of the press and political establishment, weren’t really so bon at all. The speech, these pundits have argued, wasn’t amusing; it was lewd, and worse than that, it was mean.

Wolf faced particular criticism for (besides all that sex stuff) her satire of Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who apparently was a profile in courage for sitting still with pursed lips while someone told jokes about her — “to her face!” These commentators spun the strange narrative that Wolf went after Sanders for her appearance, when in reality Wolf’s barbs centered on the press secretary’s falsehood-filled performance on the White House podium.

“She burns facts, and then she uses the ash to create a perfect smoky eye,” Wolf said of Sanders. Correct, on both counts — and many would rejoice at such an endorsement of their eye makeup. Callous attacks on women for their looks, even after Saturday night, still belong to the president who refused to attend Saturday night’s event — not to the comedian who skewered his cohorts.

All the same, countless journalists rallied behind Sanders, the same woman who spends her days lying to them. And that says a lot more about them than it does about Wolf’s routine. Everyone who told Wolf to read the room is missing the point: The room, and the misplaced notion of a “special” night to celebrate the “special” relationship between the press and the presidency that brought everyone to it on Saturday, is precisely the problem.

Wolf, according to the commentariat, violated a sacred standard of decency that defines the correspondents’ dinner every year. The comedian should roast people, yes, but she should do it at a suitably low temperature for this town’s all-too-tender egos. Wolf broke protocol by turning on the broiler. Yet the figures she scorched have shattered norms that are far more important than an unspoken prohibition on vagina jokes.

The correspondents’ dinner supposedly celebrates the rapport that journalists have with the people they cover. This three-course fete of access journalism has always made some skeptics queasy, but after the Trump administration’s active attempts to undermine every organization in the room Saturday that doesn’t treat the president as an unassailable dear leader, it’s hard to pretend that the fourth estate and its subjects can carry on a relationship that’s adversarial and respectful all at once.

That Wolf’s performance was not “normal” for the correspondents’ dinner is a testament to its timeliness and necessity — nothing is “normal” right now, and pretending otherwise out of a false sense of the fourth estate’s friendship with the executive would have been the real disgrace. Wolf called the Trump administration out for tearing down democracy. Then, the people who are supposed to care most about holding autocrats to account called her out in turn for, essentially, not being chummy enough.

That persistent chumminess is why Wolf’s performance, in the end, wasn’t really for the press. It was about us. “You guys love breaking news, and you did it,” Wolf said to CNN. “You broke it.” To everyone else, she said: “You helped create this monster, and now you’re profiting off of him.” Instead of listening — to that or to Wolf’s final line, “Flint still doesn’t have clean water” — we got grumpy on Twitter. Which means Wolf did a better job of defending the First Amendment than those who say that’s our business.

Speaking of humor, does anyone find Sarah Huckabee Sanders’s lies funny?

Molly Roberts is an editor, writer and producer for The Post’s Opinions section.

FILE – In thisOct. 12, 2004, file photo, Sinclair Broadcast Group, Inc.’s headquarters stands in Hunt Valley, Md. Media company Twenty-First Century Fox is buying seven TV stations from Sinclair Broadcast Group for $910 million.
The move comes as Sinclair is selling some stations to meet regulatory approval for its pending $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark, File)
http://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/05/web1_120492088-db930769892c4f0ba3d99a9474c4a59b.jpgFILE – In thisOct. 12, 2004, file photo, Sinclair Broadcast Group, Inc.’s headquarters stands in Hunt Valley, Md. Media company Twenty-First Century Fox is buying seven TV stations from Sinclair Broadcast Group for $910 million.
The move comes as Sinclair is selling some stations to meet regulatory approval for its pending $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark, File)

Staff and wire reports

Information from Bloomberg was used in this article. https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2018/04/29/michelle-wolf-got-it-just-right/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.a1ccb6568ca4

Information from Bloomberg was used in this article. https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2018/04/29/michelle-wolf-got-it-just-right/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.a1ccb6568ca4

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU