Community supports Library


GUEST COLUMN

By Chauncey Montgomery - Community Library Director



Meet the Authors Night

Author talk, question and answer, book signing. Thursday, March 23, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. No reservations required.

Meet Sieglinde Martin: Born at the beginning of WWII and educated in post-war Germany, Sieglinde Martin came to the U.S. in 1964. A pediatric physical therapist by profession, she previously published the book Teaching Motor Skills to Children with Cerebral Palsy and Similar Movement Disorders: A Guide for Parents and Professionals that has been translated into several languages. Now retired, she has lived in Columbus, Ohio, for over fifty years. She is the mother and grandmother of four children and grandchildren, and is a member of Central Ohioans for Peace.

About her book, Small Feet on the Run: Childhood during World War II Remembered and Arguments against War:

You may know much about World War II, but did you ever wonder how children lived through this man-made disaster that killed twenty-nine million civilians in Europe? Read about eighteen ordinary children whose childhood changed due to extraordinary events not of their making. How did they make sense of their world? They collected and traded bomb shrapnel instead of baseball cards; instead of watching cartoons, they ran out in the morning to see what last night’s bombs had destroyed; and boys played with live ammunition like your sons do with Fourth of July firecrackers. These true stories show us how resiliently and often bravely the children coped in the face of unexpected incidents of the war. You will hear about their anguish, fears and worries as well as their joys in spite of the disaster surrounding them. To history buffs the stories provide valuable eyewitness accounts of significant historic events.

In November, Sunbury’s VFW Post 8736 donated money to Community Library to install a lighted flagpole as part of the library’s renovation project. The library is extremely grateful for their support and generosity.

Community Library board members, staff, and patrons are encouraged when individuals and organizations, such as the VFW, contribute to our efforts. It demonstrates a close relationship between the library and the community, and it’s also a reminder that the library belongs to the residents of the Big Walnut area and exists to serve them.

Frequently, people will ask how they can support and contribute to library efforts. In terms of financial contributions, there are several ways to support the library. Of course, a direct donation to Community Library is always possible. Patrons make donations to the library on a regular basis.

Donations are often given for specific uses, such as the VFW’s donation for the lighted flagpole. Sometimes donations accompany a memorial or honorarium. For example, patrons may donate money to purchase a book in memory of a deceased loved one. People can also just donate money to the library without any restrictions. Those funds typically go into the general fund and are used towards programs and services; and any donation made to the library is tax-exempt.

Every once in awhile, a patron or organization will want to contribute a larger gift to the library, or someone may want to include the library in his or her will. In these cases, we encourage the donation be made to the Community Library Foundation. The Community Library Foundation is a 501(c)(3), established for the purpose of sustaining life-long learning efforts in the Big Walnut area. In addition to providing scholarships to students and library staff, the foundation also provides funding for larger capital projects and special programs.

Financial contributions are not the only way to support the library. People can also give their time. The library has many volunteer opportunities. Library outreach services depend on the help of individuals to deliver books to senior citizens and shut-ins. Additionally, the success of the local history project, Delaware County Memory, is a result of many volunteers and countless hours of digitizing and transcribing one-of-a-kind local historical documents.

For those interested in more long-term volunteering opportunities, Community Library Friends is a group of local citizens that exist to maintain a partnership between the library and the community and to promote quality library services in the Big Walnut area. The Friends not only generate funds to support programs, such as the Summer Reading Club, they also provide volunteers to help at special events, including Library Lovers’ Night and Christmas on the Square.

One of the easiest ways to support the library is by simply giving feedback on library services, collections, and programs. The library strives to provide the best experience to our users and that is only possible if we know how we are performing.

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GUEST COLUMN

By Chauncey Montgomery

Community Library Director

Meet the Authors Night

Author talk, question and answer, book signing. Thursday, March 23, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. No reservations required.

Meet Sieglinde Martin: Born at the beginning of WWII and educated in post-war Germany, Sieglinde Martin came to the U.S. in 1964. A pediatric physical therapist by profession, she previously published the book Teaching Motor Skills to Children with Cerebral Palsy and Similar Movement Disorders: A Guide for Parents and Professionals that has been translated into several languages. Now retired, she has lived in Columbus, Ohio, for over fifty years. She is the mother and grandmother of four children and grandchildren, and is a member of Central Ohioans for Peace.

About her book, Small Feet on the Run: Childhood during World War II Remembered and Arguments against War:

You may know much about World War II, but did you ever wonder how children lived through this man-made disaster that killed twenty-nine million civilians in Europe? Read about eighteen ordinary children whose childhood changed due to extraordinary events not of their making. How did they make sense of their world? They collected and traded bomb shrapnel instead of baseball cards; instead of watching cartoons, they ran out in the morning to see what last night’s bombs had destroyed; and boys played with live ammunition like your sons do with Fourth of July firecrackers. These true stories show us how resiliently and often bravely the children coped in the face of unexpected incidents of the war. You will hear about their anguish, fears and worries as well as their joys in spite of the disaster surrounding them. To history buffs the stories provide valuable eyewitness accounts of significant historic events.

To contact the library, call 740-965-3901, or email Montgomery at < chauncey@yourcl.org >. This column was originally submitted last December.

To contact the library, call 740-965-3901, or email Montgomery at < chauncey@yourcl.org >. This column was originally submitted last December.