Staff Reports



Josiah Grove and his young brother Ezra


The flu bug

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) reported flu was widespread across the state. The increase in flu activity is expected to continue for several more weeks.

With cases on rise, it’s not too late to take kids to get their flu shot. One Ohio hospital has a plan to make the process less painful for kids (and their parents!)

Dr. Melissa Winterhalter, pediatrician at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, has a list of techniques that help make the flu shot immunization process as painless as possible for kids at every age:

  • Infants respond well to swaddling, pacifiers and breastfeeding for pain control.
  • Younger children (2-6 years old) respond well to distractions like videos, music, singing and special positioning, opportunities for choice and control such as to watch or not watch, picking which arm is used, and having a role like holding the bandage.
  • Older children (6 years and older) respond well to relaxation such as deep breathing, praise, and guided imagery, like imagining and talking about a favorite place.

Quick-thinking local ‘hero’ teenager recalls first aid training to save younger brother’s life

Josiah Grove relied on skills learned in Christian leadership program Trail Life USA when 20-month-old Ezra began to choke to death

NEWARK, OH.—Teenager Josiah Grove is being heralded a hero after a classroom lesson turned into life-and-death drama when he recently used the first aid taught at boys organization Trail Life USA to save his young brother.

Josiah, 15, calmly grabbed choking 20-month-old Ezra, flipped him upside down and copied the lifesaving Heimlich maneuver he had learned to dislodge pieces of banana that had wedged in the youngster’s throat, blocking his air passage and threatening to asphyxiate him.

Josiah had been taught the intervention a few weeks earlier as part of first aid badge training at Trail Life’s OH-0148 troop, which meets at Community Church in Newark, Ohio. The faith-based organization is an outdoor adventure, character and leadership program for boys and young men, K-12.

“Ezra probably would have choked to death if Josiah had not been there and known what to do,” said mom Lisa Grove. She was washing her hair in another room at the family’s Newark home when daughter Rachel, who was watching Ezra, began to scream for help.

By the time Lisa got to the scene, Josiah was holding his young brother over the trash can in the kitchen and striking him between the shoulder blades, as he recalled. “It was scary,” Lisa said. “Ezra had turned blue.” Thankfully, Josiah’s prompt action made Ezra cough up what had been stuck, and he was soon breathing normally again.

“His face started turning purple,” recalled Josiah, whose father, Bryan, is a local pastor. “I knew when he wasn’t coughing that something was wrong.” While people have applauded his quick thinking and calm manner on social media, as word has spread about what happened, the low-key teenager has played it down.

“I’m not a hero,” said Josiah, one of five siblings and a homeschool student. “I just did what needed to be done. Whenever there is an emergency, I calm down and handle it, and then think about it after.”

The incident has reinforced his long-held dream to become a paramedic or EMT. “I have always wanted to be in the military, but I have asthma, so I can’t,” he said. “I just want to protect people and serve.”

Troopmaster Dwight Newell was not surprised to learn of Josiah’s unflappable response to the drama. “He is very quiet, very matter of fact,” he said. “What you see is what you get: he is very kind, and works extremely well with younger kids. He’s just a good Trailman.”

The incident was an example of the value of the character and skills development offered through Trail Life USA , Newell added. “It’s a wonderful feeling, knowing not only that very likely a small boy’s life was saved, but that we had a part in that,” he said. “As a volunteer, when you hear stories like that, that’s your pay.”

For Josiah’s parents, the rescue was also a reminder of their “miracle” son. Josiah was not breathing and had no pulse when he was born, not being revived for 13 minutes. Doctors told his parents “that he would have no quality of life,” Lisa said, but he went on to make a complete recovery. “He’s a miracle,” she said. “When he was little, he told us, ‘God put me here to help you guys.’”

Trail Life USA (https://www.traillifeusa.com) is a Christian outdoor adventure, character and leadership program for boys and young men, K-12. Chartered through churches in 48 states, the program centers on outdoor experiences and biblical values that build a young man’s skills and allow him to grow on a personal level and as a role model and leader for his peers.

Private employer workers’ comp premiums remain at 40-year low

COLUMBUS – The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) Board of Directors today (March 16) voted to keep the overall average rate level for Ohio private employers steady for the policy year that begins July 1. Average rate levels for private employers have been reduced by 28.2 percent since the end of 2010 and are now at their lowest level in 40 years.

“BWC strives to be a partner with Ohio employers by maintaining the lowest possible premiums and by delivering rate stability, enabling them to plan plan for the future,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Sarah Morrison. “Low and stable rates — combined with nationally-recognized workplace safety programming and excellent care for injured workers — position Ohio employers for success and Ohio workers for a healthy and prosperous future.”

The actual premium paid by individual private employers depends on a number of factors, including the expected future claims costs in their industry, their company’s recent claims history, and their participation in various programs.

The vote follows Monday’s announcement of a proposal to send $1 billion in rebates to Ohio employers in early July. Private employers’ share of the proposed rebate would total an estimated $967 million. A fact sheet regarding the rebate proposal can be found here.

Workers’ comp savings since 2011 total $6.3 billion with the proposed rebate. An overview of the $6.3 billion in workers’ comp savings since 2011 can be found here.

The board’s Audit Committee discussed the rebate yesterday and will vote on the proposal during its next regular meeting scheduled for April 28.

CDC Confirmed Lyme Cases in MI, First Time in 10 Years

What is Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease is caused by a spirochete—a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. It can affect any organ of the body, including the brain and nervous system, muscles and joints, and the heart.

How is it transmitted?

Most people get Lyme from the bite of the nymphal, or immature, form of the tick. Nymphs are about the size of a poppy seed. Because they are so tiny and their bite is painless, many people do not even realize they have been bitten.

Source: Lymedisease.org

How can it be prevented?

By killing ticks in the nymphal and adult stages, tick populations can be reduced significantly.

TIE-IN

Recent news in Michigan – Us News Reports first two cases in more than 10 years confirmed 2/24/2017. https://www.usnews.com/news/michigan/articles/2017-02-24/human-cases-of-tick-borne-lyme-disease-explode-in-michigan

Temperatures are rising and ticks are beginning to proliferate after winter dormancy

Limo driver takes work comp system for a ride, now owes BWC $80,000

COLUMBUS – A former school bus driver caught working as a limousine driver while receiving injured workers’ benefits must pay the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) $80,000 and serve five years probation.

“Thanks to responsible citizens who report fraud, we were able to stop a workers’ comp cheat and return BWC dollars to their rightful purpose — creating safer workplaces across Ohio and helping workers who are legitimately injured on the job,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Sarah Morrison.

Robert Willie, Jr., 57, of Columbus, pleaded guilty (Feb. 13) in the Franklin County Court of Common Pleas to one count of workers’ compensation fraud, a fifth-degree felony. In addition to restitution and probation, a judge warned Willie that he would serve six months in jail if he violated the terms of his probation.

Willie started collecting BWC benefits in 2010 after getting injured while working as a school bus driver. Acting on an anonymous tip to the BWC Fraud Hotline, BWC’s Special Investigations Department reviewed bank and employment records and found Willie had worked off and on for much of the time between March 2010 and May 2015, all while collecting BWC benefits. Willie worked as a limousine driver and office clerk for a Columbus company.

Ohio’s Lead Maps Available to Public

Maps identifying lead service lines across the state have been released by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. Ohio has 1,878 Ohio public drinking water systems that were required to submit the maps as part of recent drinking water reforms championed by Ohio Governor John Kasich to ensure our communities are provided information and being protected like never before from lead in drinking water.

Ohio EPA is making all the maps it received available online at: http://epa.ohio.gov/ddagw/pws/leadandcopper/map.aspx. Public water systems that are required to comply with this new requirement are listed alphabetically, and maps received by Ohio EPA can be accessed by clicking the link on the public water system name. If citizens have questions about the service lines in their area, they should call the public water system contact listed on the website.

March 9th was Ohio Meningitis Awareness Day

Tess’s Day reminder that could save lives

Columbus – The Immunization Advocacy Network of Ohio (IANO) is issuing a reminder to the public that Thursday, March 9th is Ohio Meningitis Awareness Day, or otherwise known as Tess’s Day, in memory of State Senator Cliff Hite’s niece Tess who passed from this deadly disease.

IANO is a statewide network of immunization providers and supporters who share information, best practices and serve as a collective voice educating and advocating for vaccines in Ohio,

In its most serious form, bacterial meningitis can cause inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord, a blood infection, or both. The disease can be difficult to diagnose because symptoms like headache, fever and nausea can be similar to those of more common conditions like the flu. Meningitis becomes serious very quickly, and can kill within 48 hours. Up to 15 percent of those who get meningitis will die, and of those who survive, one in five will have lasting effects like brain damage, hearing loss, or limb amputation.

People of any age can get meningitis, but those most at risk include very young children, adolescents and, especially, those living in close quarters like college dormitories. The Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend the meningococcal vaccine for everyone aged 11 to 18 years old. Ohio students entering the 7th and 12th grades are required by state law to be vaccinated against meningococcal disease.

IANO encourages Ohioans to learn more about meningococcal disease and to talk to their healthcare provider or local health department about immunizations and other information to prevent this terrible and deadly disease. You can also learn more by visiting the National Meningitis Association at http://www.nmaus.org.

Josiah Grove and his young brother Ezra
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2017/04/Josiah-Grove-and-his-young-brother-Ezra.pngJosiah Grove and his young brother Ezra

Staff Reports

The flu bug

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) reported flu was widespread across the state. The increase in flu activity is expected to continue for several more weeks.

With cases on rise, it’s not too late to take kids to get their flu shot. One Ohio hospital has a plan to make the process less painful for kids (and their parents!)

Dr. Melissa Winterhalter, pediatrician at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, has a list of techniques that help make the flu shot immunization process as painless as possible for kids at every age:

  • Infants respond well to swaddling, pacifiers and breastfeeding for pain control.
  • Younger children (2-6 years old) respond well to distractions like videos, music, singing and special positioning, opportunities for choice and control such as to watch or not watch, picking which arm is used, and having a role like holding the bandage.
  • Older children (6 years and older) respond well to relaxation such as deep breathing, praise, and guided imagery, like imagining and talking about a favorite place.