Mosquito control grants issued


Staff Reports



2006 James Gathany This 2006 photograph depicted a female <i>Aedes aegypti</i> mosquito while she was in the process of acquiring a blood meal from her human host, who in this instance, was actually the biomedical photographer, James Gathany, here at the Centers for Disease Control. Youll note the feeding apparatus consisting of a sharp, orange-colored fascicle, which while not feeding, is covered in a soft, pliant sheath called the "labellum, which retracts as the sharp stylets contained within pierce the host's skin surface, as the insect obtains its blood meal. The orange color of the fascicle is due to the red color of the blood as it migrates up the thin, sharp translucent tube. The fascicle is composed of a pair of needle-sharp "stylets". The larger of the two stylets, known as the "labrum", when viewed in cross-section takes on the shape of an inverted "V", and acts as a gutter, which directs the ingested host blood towards the insect's mouth. As the primary vector responsible for the transmission of the <i>Flavivirus</i> Dengue (DF), and Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), the day-biting <i>Aedes aegypti</i> mosquito prefers to feed on its human hosts. <i>Ae. aegypti</i> also plays a major role as a vector for another <i>Flavivirus</i>, "Yellow fever". Frequently found in its tropical environs, the white banded markings on the tarsal segments of its jointed legs, though distinguishing it as <i>Ae. aegypti</i>, are similar to some other mosquito species. Also note the lyre-shaped, silvery-white markings on its thoracic region as well, which is also a determining morphologic identifying characteristic.


Ohio EPA Announces Recipients of Statewide Mosquito Control Grants

Ohio EPA Director Craig W. Butler and Ohio Department of Health Acting Director Lance Himes announced nearly $1 million in funding for community health departments and related public entities across the state for mosquito control grants. The funding will help mitigate the spread of mosquito-borne viruses such as Zika, West Nile and La Cross Encephalitis.

“The Mosquito Control Grant program has been a major success,” said Director Butler. “Tires are often a breeding ground for mosquitoes, and fortunately, we have developed an innovative way to put dollars to work to help prevent mosquito-borne illnesses.”

Mosquito control grants will specifically target:

• mosquito surveillance;

• larval control;

• adult mosquito control, such as spraying where mosquito presence poses a risk to public health;

• community outreach;

• breeding source reduction, including trash or tire removal; and

• additional proposed activities.

Grants totaling $976,600 are being issued in 35 counties and four cities and are available in collaboration and support with the Ohio Department of Health’s larger effort to mitigate the potential for an outbreak of mosquito-borne viruses. Over the last two years, Ohio EPA and the Ohio Department of Health have awarded nearly $3 million to local health departments and communities for mosquito control programs.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency was created in 1972 to consolidate efforts to protect and improve air quality, water quality and waste management in Ohio. Since then, air pollutants dropped by as much as 90 percent; large rivers meeting standards improved from 21 percent to 89 percent; and hundreds of polluting, open dumps were replaced with engineered landfills and an increased emphasis on waste reduction and recycling.

Ohio EPA Releases Draft 2018 Drinking Water

Assistance Program Management Plan

Ohio EPA will hold two public hearings on Friday, June 16, 2017, to accept public comments on the draft 2018 Program Management Plan for the Drinking Water Assistance Fund (DWAF). The fund provides financial and technical assistance for a variety of projects that help improve or protect the quality of Ohio’s drinking water.

The public meetings begin at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at Ohio EPA’s Central Office, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus. All visitors should bring photo identification in order to register at the security desk.

For program year 2018, which runs from July 1, 2017, through June 30, 2018, Ohio EPA received project nominations totaling $367 million. Funds are available to all applicants that meet program requirements.

Ohio EPA plans to offer up to $6.9 million in principal forgiveness to eligible projects. Principal forgiveness is the portion of a loan that is not required to be repaid. Regionalization and human health projects will be prioritized to receive principal forgiveness.

Ohio EPA will continue to offer targeted funding for improvements to surface water treatment plants addressing Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) issues, emergency connections between public drinking water systems, replacement and upgrading of water meters, auxiliary power systems and asset management projects.

All projects listed for funding were required to be nominated by March 1, 2017, with the exception of planning projects as well as construction projects that implement recommended corrosion controls or replace lead service lines. These projects may be nominated any time during program year 2018.

The primary sources of funds in the DWAF program are proceeds from bond issues, repayments of previously awarded loans and annual federal capitalization grants. Occasionally, Ohio EPA also issues revenue bonds to raise funds to meet the coming year’s funding requests.

Copies of the Draft 2018 Program Management Plan are available on the web, by contacting defamail@epa.ohio.gov, or calling (614) 644-2798. Written comments also can be mailed to Ohio EPA, Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance, P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio 43216-1049, or emailed to defamail@epa.ohio.gov. The agency is accepting comments on its draft plan through June 16.

U.S. Government Laboratory Determines Plastics-to-Fuel Technology Helps Reduce GHG Emissions, Save Water, And Conserve Traditional Fuels

WASHINGTON (May 16, 2017)—Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), part of the U.S. Department of Energy, has determined that using pyrolysis to convert non-recycled plastics into ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel results in significant energy and environmental benefits. These include reductions of up to 14 percent in greenhouse gas emissions, up to 58 percent in water consumption, and up to 96 percent in traditional energy use when compared to ULSD from conventional crude oil.

The peer-reviewed analysis “Life-Cycle Analysis of Fuels from Post-use Non-recycled Plastics,” was published in the April 14, 2017, edition of the journal Fuel. ANL based the analysis on its highly regarded Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model, using data provided by five companies. The GREET database contains more than 100 different fuel pathways, has more than 30,000 subscribers, and is used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in implementing the Renewable Fuel Standard Program enacted by Congress.

“Argonne’s analysis clearly determines that plastics-to-fuel (PTF) technology is a viable and beneficial materials management option,” said Craig Cookson, director of recycling and energy recovery for the American Chemistry Council. “Not only does PTF reduce waste going to landfills, but these technologies can help reduce GHG emissions while conserving both water and energy.”

PTF facilities use pyrolysis, a process that converts post-use non-recycled plastics into liquid fuels and chemical feedstocks by heating them in the absence of oxygen. ANL assessed the potential energy and environmental benefits of converting non-recycled plastics into diesel using pyrolysis.

“The GREET model is the globally recognized benchmark for sustainability professionals, energy companies, and federal and state government agencies for making informed, scientifically based decisions about material use and post-use pathways for fuels,” said Rick Wagner, global sustainability manager at Chevron Phillips Chemical Company.

The American Chemistry Council (ACC) represents the leading companies engaged in the business of chemistry. ACC members apply the science of chemistry to make innovative products and services that make people’s lives better, healthier and safer. ACC is committed to improved environmental, health and safety performance through Responsible Care®, common sense advocacy designed to address major public policy issues, and health and environmental research and product testing. The business of chemistry is a $797 billion enterprise and a key element of the nation’s economy. It is the nation’s largest exporter, accounting for fourteen percent of all U.S. exports. Chemistry companies are among the largest investors in research and development. Safety and security have always been primary concerns of ACC members, and they have intensified their efforts, working closely with government agencies to improve security and to defend against any threat to the nation’s critical infrastructure.

2006
James Gathany

This 2006 photograph depicted a female <i>Aedes aegypti</i> mosquito while she was in the process of acquiring a blood meal from her human host, who in this instance, was actually the biomedical photographer, James Gathany, here at the Centers for Disease Control. Youll note the feeding apparatus consisting of a sharp, orange-colored fascicle, which while not feeding, is covered in a soft, pliant sheath called the "labellum, which retracts as the sharp stylets contained within pierce the host’s skin surface, as the insect obtains its blood meal. The orange color of the fascicle is due to the red color of the blood as it migrates up the thin, sharp translucent tube. The fascicle is composed of a pair of needle-sharp "stylets". The larger of the two stylets, known as the "labrum", when viewed in cross-section takes on the shape of an inverted "V", and acts as a gutter, which directs the ingested host blood towards the insect’s mouth.

As the primary vector responsible for the transmission of the <i>Flavivirus</i> Dengue (DF), and Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), the day-biting <i>Aedes aegypti</i> mosquito prefers to feed on its human hosts. <i>Ae. aegypti</i> also plays a major role as a vector for another <i>Flavivirus</i>, "Yellow fever". Frequently found in its tropical environs, the white banded markings on the tarsal segments of its jointed legs, though distinguishing it as <i>Ae. aegypti</i>, are similar to some other mosquito species. Also note the lyre-shaped, silvery-white markings on its thoracic region as well, which is also a determining morphologic identifying characteristic.

http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2017/05/web1_mosquito.jpg2006
James Gathany

This 2006 photograph depicted a female <i>Aedes aegypti</i> mosquito while she was in the process of acquiring a blood meal from her human host, who in this instance, was actually the biomedical photographer, James Gathany, here at the Centers for Disease Control. Youll note the feeding apparatus consisting of a sharp, orange-colored fascicle, which while not feeding, is covered in a soft, pliant sheath called the "labellum, which retracts as the sharp stylets contained within pierce the host’s skin surface, as the insect obtains its blood meal. The orange color of the fascicle is due to the red color of the blood as it migrates up the thin, sharp translucent tube. The fascicle is composed of a pair of needle-sharp "stylets". The larger of the two stylets, known as the "labrum", when viewed in cross-section takes on the shape of an inverted "V", and acts as a gutter, which directs the ingested host blood towards the insect’s mouth.

As the primary vector responsible for the transmission of the <i>Flavivirus</i> Dengue (DF), and Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), the day-biting <i>Aedes aegypti</i> mosquito prefers to feed on its human hosts. <i>Ae. aegypti</i> also plays a major role as a vector for another <i>Flavivirus</i>, "Yellow fever". Frequently found in its tropical environs, the white banded markings on the tarsal segments of its jointed legs, though distinguishing it as <i>Ae. aegypti</i>, are similar to some other mosquito species. Also note the lyre-shaped, silvery-white markings on its thoracic region as well, which is also a determining morphologic identifying characteristic.

Staff Reports