Protect Lake Erie from Asian Carp


Staff Report



A school of jumping silver carp, one of the three types of Asian carp.


Ohio Fisheries Critical to Local Tourism Jobs, Economy

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) introduced a pair of bills to protect and restore Ohio fisheries, which support Ohio’s tourism industry and local jobs.

“A healthy, clean Lake Erie is essential to Ohio’s multi-billion dollar tourism and recreation industry,” said Brown. “Our anglers and visitors to our state know how important it is to protect and restore streams and rivers across the Great Lakes. I’ll keep working to protect Lake Erie and its tributaries so Ohioans can continue to fish and enjoy it for generations to come.”

The Great Lakes Aquatic Connectivity and Infrastructure Program Act would support infrastructure updates that will improve Great Lakes fisheries and restore habitats. The bill would provide grants to repair or replace aging dams, culverts and roads that inhibit the movement of fish populations across the Great Lakes Basin. The bill creates a grant program under which a group of appointed state and tribal representatives review proposals for infrastructure projects to help improve fisheries.

The Great Lakes Mass Marking Program Act would help better monitor the health of fish populations in the Great Lakes through better scientific tracking technology. This will help U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in partnership with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources make decisions to support and rehabilitate sport fish populations in the basin. This program was initiated in the Great Lakes on a limited scale in 2010, and would be fully established in statute under this legislation.

Brown introduced the bills with his colleagues along the Great Lakes, including U.S. Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters from Michigan.

COLUMBUS — Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine sent a letter to the Department of the Army, Civil Works, calling for the release of a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study on a method to help stop Asian Carp from invading the Great Lakes. The letter comes amid reports of a silver carp found nine miles from Lake Michigan, beyond electric barriers designed to block the fish.

“The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ delay in the face of this immediate threat is unacceptable,” Attorney General DeWine said. “The Corps’ choice to withhold the plan even after its January 2017 due date could jeopardize the ultimate outcome.”

Lake Erie is considered especially susceptible to invasive Asian Carp, which could complete with native species, cause extensive damage to the ecosystem, and devastate the fishing and tourism industries. In his letter, Attorney General DeWine explains that Lake Erie is a source of drinking water for 3 million Ohioans, provides 124,000 jobs to Ohioans, and generates $1.8 billion in tourism revenue to Ohio.

The letter calls for the release of the Tentatively Selected Plan for the Brandon Road Study, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study examining ways to keep invasive Asian Carp out of the Great Lakes and block entry of the fish through the Brandon Road Lock and Dam in Illinois.

Attorney General DeWine says it is imperative to issue the tentative plan immediately, given the time it will take to implement a specific plan.

“If Asian Carp are allowed to reach the Great Lakes, it may be too late to save Lake Erie,” Attorney General DeWine said in the letter.

A copy of the letter is available on the Ohio Attorney General’s website.

Mike DeWine has long been an advocate for protecting the Great Lakes. As a U.S. Senator, he introduced both the National Aquatic Invasive Species Act and the Asian Carp Prevention and Control Act to address invasive species attacking Lake Erie and the other Great Lakes.

A school of jumping silver carp, one of the three types of Asian carp.
http://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2017/07/web1_school-of-jumping-silver-carp-credit-jason-Jenkins-800px.jpgA school of jumping silver carp, one of the three types of Asian carp.

Staff Report

Ohio Fisheries Critical to Local Tourism Jobs, Economy

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) introduced a pair of bills to protect and restore Ohio fisheries, which support Ohio’s tourism industry and local jobs.

“A healthy, clean Lake Erie is essential to Ohio’s multi-billion dollar tourism and recreation industry,” said Brown. “Our anglers and visitors to our state know how important it is to protect and restore streams and rivers across the Great Lakes. I’ll keep working to protect Lake Erie and its tributaries so Ohioans can continue to fish and enjoy it for generations to come.”

The Great Lakes Aquatic Connectivity and Infrastructure Program Act would support infrastructure updates that will improve Great Lakes fisheries and restore habitats. The bill would provide grants to repair or replace aging dams, culverts and roads that inhibit the movement of fish populations across the Great Lakes Basin. The bill creates a grant program under which a group of appointed state and tribal representatives review proposals for infrastructure projects to help improve fisheries.

The Great Lakes Mass Marking Program Act would help better monitor the health of fish populations in the Great Lakes through better scientific tracking technology. This will help U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in partnership with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources make decisions to support and rehabilitate sport fish populations in the basin. This program was initiated in the Great Lakes on a limited scale in 2010, and would be fully established in statute under this legislation.

Brown introduced the bills with his colleagues along the Great Lakes, including U.S. Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters from Michigan.