Cowboy Day ‘15 at Cashman’s


By Lenny C. Lepola - newsguy@ee.net



For the ever-popular Oldest Cowboy Boots Contest during Sunbury Halter & Saddles American Day of the Cowboy celebration, contestants don’t wear their best. They dig to the back of the closet and get out that old pair of boots that are falling apart, but are also probably the most comfortable pair of boots they own. Participants in this year’s Oldest Cowboy Boots competition were, from left, Abigail Risoya, Anton Delany, Brandon Edwards, Kasen Knapp and Kelsey Anderson. When the dust settled, judge Annie Lord chose the beat up, worn out, tired old pair of boots worn by Kelsey Anderson as first place winner.


News/Lenny C. Lepola

Did you know?

• Cowboy traditions have been part of the American landscape and culture since 1523.

• The cowboy continues to be an important part of the economy through the work of approximately 656,500 ranches in all 50 States.

• The annual attendance at rodeos exceeds 30,000,000 fans worldwide.

• The Battle of Little Big Horn (a.k.a. Custer’s Last Stand, Montana, June 25-26, 1876) was called the Battle of the Greasy Grass by Native Americans.

• The Pony Express began in St. Joseph, Missouri taking 10 days to deliver mail 2,000 miles away to Sacramento, California in the summer and 12 to 16 days for delivery of mail in the winter.

• The Pony Express Company had 80 riders who would carry the mail and deliver it to the next of the 100 stations along the way using 400 to 500 company horses.

• The fastest recorded delivery by Pony Express was seven days and 17 hours to deliver President Abraham Lincoln’s Inaugural Address to California.

• The National Day of the Cowboy has been celebrated in Iraq and Afghanistan by U.S. troops, on the International Space Station, and in countries around the world where men and women mount horses and tend to ranches.

The 11th National Day of the Cowboy was celebrated last Saturday at Cashman’s Horse Equipment Outlet & Drive Thru Feed Store on US 42 north of Delaware, where members of Sunbury Halter & Saddle 4-H Club held their seventh annual recognition of the pioneering men and women, popularly known as cowboys, that helped establish America’s frontiers.

Sunbury Halter & Saddle’s earliest venue for the celebration had been JR Smith Park in Sunbury, then they moved to Sunbury’s Freedom Park on Ohio 61, behind Sunbury Church of the Nazarene. This year members of the club opened up the celebration to other 4-H clubs and equestrian aficionado’s, making the move to Cashman’s with an equestrian ring a more appropriate setting.

The word cowboy brings different images to each individual, but the National Day of the Cowboy website notes that the cowboy archetype transcends gender, generations, ethnicity, geographic boundaries and political affiliation; the word cowboy embodies honesty, integrity, courage, compassion and determination; and the cowboy spirit exemplifies patriotism, strength of character and stewardship.

Saturday’s celebration at Cashman’s included games, contests, cowboy poetry, an historic reenactment of the Battle of the Little Big Horn by 4-H Club members, a dog obedience competition, equestrian competitions in the outdoor ring judged by Annie Lord, and a potluck dinner.

Special guest Rick Williams, a Worthington resident who portrays General George Armstrong Custer in re-enactments nationwide, said 4-H club activities like celebrating the National Day of the Cowboy helps young people connect with their past.

Sunbury Halter & Saddle advisor Suzanne Allen said this year’s Cowboy Day celebration had a good turnout, in spite of 90 degree weather.

“The turnout was good, and the kids did all the planning during several meetings,” Allen said. “It was a good day for club members who are going to the state and Hartford fairs to practice showing in classes in the ring.”

Allen said a big Thank You goes to Cashman’s for providing the venue, Annie Lord for judging equestrian classes, and General Custer (a.k.a. Rick Williams) for showing up.

“The day turned out real nice, considering the last several years we’ve had rain or the threat of rain,” Allen added. “I think everyone had a nice time.”

For additional information about The National Day of the Cowboy go to < nationaldayofthecowboy.com >.

For additional information about Rick Williams go to < general-custer.com >.

For the ever-popular Oldest Cowboy Boots Contest during Sunbury Halter & Saddles American Day of the Cowboy celebration, contestants don’t wear their best. They dig to the back of the closet and get out that old pair of boots that are falling apart, but are also probably the most comfortable pair of boots they own. Participants in this year’s Oldest Cowboy Boots competition were, from left, Abigail Risoya, Anton Delany, Brandon Edwards, Kasen Knapp and Kelsey Anderson. When the dust settled, judge Annie Lord chose the beat up, worn out, tired old pair of boots worn by Kelsey Anderson as first place winner.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2015/07/web1_Cowboy2015-1341.a.jpgFor the ever-popular Oldest Cowboy Boots Contest during Sunbury Halter & Saddles American Day of the Cowboy celebration, contestants don’t wear their best. They dig to the back of the closet and get out that old pair of boots that are falling apart, but are also probably the most comfortable pair of boots they own. Participants in this year’s Oldest Cowboy Boots competition were, from left, Abigail Risoya, Anton Delany, Brandon Edwards, Kasen Knapp and Kelsey Anderson. When the dust settled, judge Annie Lord chose the beat up, worn out, tired old pair of boots worn by Kelsey Anderson as first place winner. News/Lenny C. Lepola

By Lenny C. Lepola

newsguy@ee.net

Did you know?

• Cowboy traditions have been part of the American landscape and culture since 1523.

• The cowboy continues to be an important part of the economy through the work of approximately 656,500 ranches in all 50 States.

• The annual attendance at rodeos exceeds 30,000,000 fans worldwide.

• The Battle of Little Big Horn (a.k.a. Custer’s Last Stand, Montana, June 25-26, 1876) was called the Battle of the Greasy Grass by Native Americans.

• The Pony Express began in St. Joseph, Missouri taking 10 days to deliver mail 2,000 miles away to Sacramento, California in the summer and 12 to 16 days for delivery of mail in the winter.

• The Pony Express Company had 80 riders who would carry the mail and deliver it to the next of the 100 stations along the way using 400 to 500 company horses.

• The fastest recorded delivery by Pony Express was seven days and 17 hours to deliver President Abraham Lincoln’s Inaugural Address to California.

• The National Day of the Cowboy has been celebrated in Iraq and Afghanistan by U.S. troops, on the International Space Station, and in countries around the world where men and women mount horses and tend to ranches.

Reporter Lenny C. Lepola may be reached at 614-266-6093.

Reporter Lenny C. Lepola may be reached at 614-266-6093.