Brammer essay winner again


By Lenny C. Lepola - newsguy@ee.net



Brammer


A Hero

By Ekaterina Brammer

A hero. Two syllables, four letters, but so much more than a simple word. A hero is not someone who gets paid millions of dollars and gets as famous as the movie stars. They hardly get any recognition for the selfless acts that they do for their community and for those they may not even know. They are teachers, parents, or even a next door neighbor. Most people might not even know of the things they have accomplished. While there are many people who brag about all the good they’ve done; there are men and women that keep their good silent. They don’t get the honor, the money or even a thank you for what they have done for the people they’ve helped. They are the silent heroes that do so much to receive so little. Heroes should be respected because they don’t brag or get recognized of their acts, the strength they go through to save others, and the selflessness that they carry on throughout their lives.

There are more heroes in everyday life than many may think. The men and women that sacrifice their lives for the freedom of America are more than just fighters for the country, but fighters for respect of the American people after the wars. There are twenty-two American veterans that kill themselves everyday because of homelessness, PTSD, and no respect from the American citizens. The heroes that fight for everyone’s freedom, are at war even when they have left the battlefield. They have risked their lives and they are left in debt and they don’t have the money for simple things like healthcare and homes. Millions of veterans go unknown and some don’t want people to even know that they were in the military. They are the silent heroes that people see everyday, and should be more acknowledged for everything they have done to save America from having its freedoms taken away.

People have fought through wars to save our country, but there is one battle that people cannot fight. Natural disasters are horrific things that no matter what we do, there is no way for these things to be stopped. Matthew is a grade four hurricane that has stuck the caribbean, as well as the east coast of North America, killing thirty-three, injuring thousands, and making millions homeless. There is no way that Hurricane Matthew could have been prevented, but there are multiple men and women that help clean up the aftermath. The first responders are heroes for their strength that they have to help people rebuild their lives after terror strikes. The American Red Cross, Peace Corps, and the National Guard are examples of first responder organizations that have helped save millions, not just in America, but around the world. When there was a 7.0 earthquake in Haiti, they were there, helping everyone get back on their feet, and even as the death toll rose, they never lost hope or their desire to help. The people who are selfless and choose to fix other people’s live before their own are the people that end up changing communities for the good, and although some may not know them, they should be respected and honored for the cooperation that they’ve done.

Near and far, there are heroes all around. Some may be silent, some may be open. Some may work alone and others in groups. Whoever they are, they are here, and will never turn down a moment for help when there are people in need. They are the many, yet the few, but all the proud.

Big Walnut High School freshman Ekaterina “Kat” Brammer was in familiar territory when she won the Delaware County Chapter of the American Red Cross 2016 Youth Hero’s Essay Contest and attended the chapter’s 2016 Hero’s Breakfast.

Brammer submitted an essay to the 2012 contest when she was a fifth grade student at Big Walnut Intermediate School and was a winner that year also.

“I was surprised that I won,” Brammer said. “I thought that because my name was on record I wouldn’t be eligible, but I wrote the essay at the last minute, spit out 600 words in 30 minutes, and submitted it. I got a call two weeks later saying I won the contest.”

Brammer said her essay focused on what different people say constitutes a hero.

“A lot of heroes are not famous,” Brammer said. “It’s just when the time comes they do the right thing.”

Brammer attended the Thursday, November 3, American Red Cross Heroes Breakfast at the Hamilton-Williams Campus Center on the Ohio Wesleyan University campus.

“It was really cool to see other people there, and hear about what they have done,” Brammer said.

At Big Walnut High School Brammer is involved in cheerleading, gymnastics, track, drama, and plays alto saxophone in the band. Future plans are to attend college with a double major in Information Technology and Journalism.

Kat Brammer is the daughter of Michelle and Brad Brammer.

Brammer
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2016/11/web1_KatBrammer01a.jpgBrammer

By Lenny C. Lepola

newsguy@ee.net

A Hero

By Ekaterina Brammer

A hero. Two syllables, four letters, but so much more than a simple word. A hero is not someone who gets paid millions of dollars and gets as famous as the movie stars. They hardly get any recognition for the selfless acts that they do for their community and for those they may not even know. They are teachers, parents, or even a next door neighbor. Most people might not even know of the things they have accomplished. While there are many people who brag about all the good they’ve done; there are men and women that keep their good silent. They don’t get the honor, the money or even a thank you for what they have done for the people they’ve helped. They are the silent heroes that do so much to receive so little. Heroes should be respected because they don’t brag or get recognized of their acts, the strength they go through to save others, and the selflessness that they carry on throughout their lives.

There are more heroes in everyday life than many may think. The men and women that sacrifice their lives for the freedom of America are more than just fighters for the country, but fighters for respect of the American people after the wars. There are twenty-two American veterans that kill themselves everyday because of homelessness, PTSD, and no respect from the American citizens. The heroes that fight for everyone’s freedom, are at war even when they have left the battlefield. They have risked their lives and they are left in debt and they don’t have the money for simple things like healthcare and homes. Millions of veterans go unknown and some don’t want people to even know that they were in the military. They are the silent heroes that people see everyday, and should be more acknowledged for everything they have done to save America from having its freedoms taken away.

People have fought through wars to save our country, but there is one battle that people cannot fight. Natural disasters are horrific things that no matter what we do, there is no way for these things to be stopped. Matthew is a grade four hurricane that has stuck the caribbean, as well as the east coast of North America, killing thirty-three, injuring thousands, and making millions homeless. There is no way that Hurricane Matthew could have been prevented, but there are multiple men and women that help clean up the aftermath. The first responders are heroes for their strength that they have to help people rebuild their lives after terror strikes. The American Red Cross, Peace Corps, and the National Guard are examples of first responder organizations that have helped save millions, not just in America, but around the world. When there was a 7.0 earthquake in Haiti, they were there, helping everyone get back on their feet, and even as the death toll rose, they never lost hope or their desire to help. The people who are selfless and choose to fix other people’s live before their own are the people that end up changing communities for the good, and although some may not know them, they should be respected and honored for the cooperation that they’ve done.

Near and far, there are heroes all around. Some may be silent, some may be open. Some may work alone and others in groups. Whoever they are, they are here, and will never turn down a moment for help when there are people in need. They are the many, yet the few, but all the proud.

Reporter Lenny C. Lepola can be reached at 614-266-6093.

Reporter Lenny C. Lepola can be reached at 614-266-6093.