4-H season on the horizon


By Lenny C. Lepola - newsguy@ee.net



Three flags are displayed in project barns at the Delaware County Fair where Delaware County 4-H Club members show their projects – the State of Ohio Flag, the 4-H Flag, and the FFA Flag. Many eastern Delaware County 4-H Club members also live in the Hartford Fair District, allowing them to also show projects at the Hartford Independent Fair in early August.


4-H Facts

• 4-H began in Clark County, Ohio on January 15, 1902.

• Mr. Albert Belmont Graham, the superintendent of the Springfield Township Schools, held the first 4-H meeting with thirty boys and girls in the county courthouse basement.

• The first 4-H group was called the “Boy’s and Girl’s Agricultural Club.”

• By 1905, there were over 2,000 youth within sixteen counties in programs similar to the original Agricultural Club.

• The 4-H program has since spread to all fifty U.S. States and internationally to more than eighty countries.

• Membership is open to all youth between the ages of five and nineteen.

• 4-H is no longer only for members of the farming community, but extends into the suburbs and inner cities.

• Last year, more than 28 percent of all Ohio 4-H Club members were living in towns and cities with populations between 10,000 and 50,000. More than 16 percent were living in cities and suburbs with populations greater than 50,000.

• Nearly 300,000 Ohio youth are enrolled in 4-H youth development programs.

• One out of every six people in Ohio has been or is currently involved with 4-H youth development programs either as a member, parent, volunteer, or donor.

• Approximately 30,000 volunteers will participate in the Ohio 4-H program this year.

• 4-H offers learning experiences in more than 200 subject matter areas, including: health, family life, photography, aerospace science, bicycles, natural resources, safety, horticulture and nutrition.

• There are currently 45 million 4-H alumni nationwide.

• 4-H alumni include businessman Bob Evans, singer and songwriter Johnny Cash, novelist John Updike, Senator Mike DeWine, former OSU president Gordon Gee, and sportscaster Don Meredith.

Most folks think of 4-H season as summertime when county fairs are held around the state; but 4-H club members join their respective clubs, elect officers, and choose projects early in the calendar year. Also during March while clubs are organizing, current club members and club advisors begin recruiting new members.

Each year The Delaware County OSU Extension hosts an open house where club members and advisors share 4-H experiences and opportunities with members of the community. This year’s Delaware County Extension 4-H Open House will be held from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Monday, March 27, at the Delaware County Extension office, 149 N. Sandusky Street, Delaware.

4-H Club members and advisors in the Sunbury-Galena area will also hold an Open House featuring eastern Delaware County 4-H Clubs 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 5, at the Berkshire Township Hall, 1454 Rome Corners Road, Galena.

Both open house events feature information about Delaware County 4-H Clubs, including project opportunities. Project books will be on display, and take-home 4-H Family Guides. Current 4-H Club advisors and club members will be available to answer questions and direct potential new members to clubs that offer projects in specific areas of interest.

Ohio 4-H offers more than 200 projects for youth in kindergarten through age 18.

Delaware County 4-H Educator Laryssa Hook said 4-H is not just for rural farm youth; that today’s 4-H Clubs are serving a more urban and suburban population.

“4-H is not just about animals anymore, but our agricultural roots are still important,” Hook said. “Experience in 4-H Clubs continues to contribute to our nation’s agricultural industry, but you don’t have to have an animal to be in 4-H. Through 4-H, youth ages 5 to 19 can participate in hands-on experiences, learning about things like bottle rockets, photography, electricity, cooking, sewing, art, leadership, natural resources, gardening, animal sciences, and much more, helping them to increase their self-confidence and personal life skills while learning about specific subjects.”

Hook said Delaware County serves 1,300 youths ages 5 to 19 in 65 4-H Clubs. Over 300 adult volunteers contribute over 15,000 hours of time to teach life skills such as leadership, decision-making, and communication skills through project work.

For more information about the 4-H program and finding a club near you, contact the Delaware County OSU Extension office at 740-833-2030 or visit their website at < delaware.osu.edu/ > and on the left side of the page click 4=H Youth Development.

Information about 4-H projects is also available at Ohio 4-H Project Central, a web site that offers previews of project books, <projectcentral.ohio4h.org>.

Three flags are displayed in project barns at the Delaware County Fair where Delaware County 4-H Club members show their projects – the State of Ohio Flag, the 4-H Flag, and the FFA Flag. Many eastern Delaware County 4-H Club members also live in the Hartford Fair District, allowing them to also show projects at the Hartford Independent Fair in early August.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2017/02/web1_4h-ffa-banners.jpgThree flags are displayed in project barns at the Delaware County Fair where Delaware County 4-H Club members show their projects – the State of Ohio Flag, the 4-H Flag, and the FFA Flag. Many eastern Delaware County 4-H Club members also live in the Hartford Fair District, allowing them to also show projects at the Hartford Independent Fair in early August.

By Lenny C. Lepola

newsguy@ee.net

4-H Facts

• 4-H began in Clark County, Ohio on January 15, 1902.

• Mr. Albert Belmont Graham, the superintendent of the Springfield Township Schools, held the first 4-H meeting with thirty boys and girls in the county courthouse basement.

• The first 4-H group was called the “Boy’s and Girl’s Agricultural Club.”

• By 1905, there were over 2,000 youth within sixteen counties in programs similar to the original Agricultural Club.

• The 4-H program has since spread to all fifty U.S. States and internationally to more than eighty countries.

• Membership is open to all youth between the ages of five and nineteen.

• 4-H is no longer only for members of the farming community, but extends into the suburbs and inner cities.

• Last year, more than 28 percent of all Ohio 4-H Club members were living in towns and cities with populations between 10,000 and 50,000. More than 16 percent were living in cities and suburbs with populations greater than 50,000.

• Nearly 300,000 Ohio youth are enrolled in 4-H youth development programs.

• One out of every six people in Ohio has been or is currently involved with 4-H youth development programs either as a member, parent, volunteer, or donor.

• Approximately 30,000 volunteers will participate in the Ohio 4-H program this year.

• 4-H offers learning experiences in more than 200 subject matter areas, including: health, family life, photography, aerospace science, bicycles, natural resources, safety, horticulture and nutrition.

• There are currently 45 million 4-H alumni nationwide.

• 4-H alumni include businessman Bob Evans, singer and songwriter Johnny Cash, novelist John Updike, Senator Mike DeWine, former OSU president Gordon Gee, and sportscaster Don Meredith.

Reporter Lenny C. Lepola can be reached at 614-266-6093.

Reporter Lenny C. Lepola can be reached at 614-266-6093.