Ohio State tops Big Ten Conference in GameDay Recycling Challenge


Staff Reports



A ton of food of food scraps is composted at Delaware’s Price Farm Organics after every OSU home football game.


Price Farms Organics receives OEPA grant

The Ohio EPA awarded $1.35 million in recycling market development grants to eight projects from around Ohio that include assistance with the creation and expansion of organic recycling facilities and equipment purchases for recycling facilities and manufacturers. As a result, more material will be diverted from regional waste streams including plastics, glass and fiber. The projects are expected to create 13 new jobs.

Businesses are eligible for funding, but must be sponsored by a public entity, such as a municipality, county, township or solid waste management district.

Projects approved for funding include (rounded to the nearest dollar):

· Price Farm Organics, in partnership with the Delaware, Knox, Morrow and Marion County Solid Waste District, $250,000 to purchase a portable horizontal grinder with conveying stacker and compost screener to undertake organic recycling for the community.

· Kitchen Aid, in partnership with the Darke County Solid Waste District, $44,433 grant to purchase eight vertical balers that will allow the company to convert waste material into usable feedstock for their production system.

· Econopia, in partnership with Franklin County, $250,000 to purchase an organics in-vessel processing unit to assist with organic recycling at the facility in Columbus.

· Barnes Nursery, in partnership with the Lorain County Solid Waste District, $66,538 to purchase two food waste trucks to assist processing organic recycling for Ottawa, Seneca, Sandusky, Huron, Erie, Lorain and Cuyahoga counties.

· I.D. Images, in partnership with Medina County Solid Waste Management District, $108,027 to purchase a horizontal auto tie baler and label stock used to prepare the material for the waste to energy market.

· G.I.B., in partnership with the Ottawa, Sandusky and Seneca Solid Waste District, $138,195 to purchase a recycling truck and 12 commercial roll-off containers to provide recycling services for commercial establishments.

· Waste Management, in partnership with Summit and Akron Solid Waste Management Authority, $250,000 to purchase a bag breaking unit and optical sorter for the Akron Materials Recovery Facility.

· Zanesville Energy, in partnership with The Ohio State University, Zanesville, $250,000 to purchase an organics depackaging system to allow organics recycling at the University branch campus and servicing of other organic material generators.

Ohio EPA is responsible for implementing statewide waste reduction, recycling market development and litter prevention programs. All Ohioans are encouraged to reduce waste, recycle materials and buy recycled content products to make recycling in Ohio even more successful.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency was created in 1972 to consolidate efforts to protect and improve air quality, water quality and waste management in Ohio. Since then, air pollutants dropped by as much as 90 percent; large rivers meeting standards improved from 21 percent to 89 percent; and hundreds of polluting, open dumps were replaced with engineered landfills and an increased emphasis on waste reduction and recycling.

Ohio State tops Big Ten Conference in GameDay Recycling Challenge

For the fifth year in a row, The Ohio State University topped the Big Ten Conference in the annual GameDay Recycling Challenge by diverting more waste than any other Big Ten university.

The GameDay Recycling challenge is a national competition among colleges and universities, to promote waste reduction and sustainability at home football games.

Ohio State achieved an average diversion rate of 95.4 percent at Ohio Stadium during the 2016 home football season. Ohio State’s most successful single-game total came November 26 against the University of Michigan, when it recorded a 96.23 percent diversion rate. That total was more than 20 percent higher than any single-game diversion rate totals achieved by conference competitors.

“These efforts to minimize the impact of massive amounts of waste support Ohio State’s university-wide sustainability goal of achieving zero waste on campus by 2025,” said Tony Gillund, sustainability manager for Ohio State’s Facilities Operations and Development.

Ohio Stadium has been zero waste since 2013. Zero waste refers to diverting 90 percent or more of disposed materials away from the landfill by recycling, re-purposing and composting.

Nearly 96 tons of recycling and compost materials were produced this season, with only 4.5 tons of trash being sent to landfills. On average, more than one ton of consumer food scraps are sent to Price Farm Organics in Delaware, Ohio for composting following each game. Ohio Stadium saw higher recycling numbers in 2016 than in previous years; more than one ton of aluminum was collected for recycling after each game.

In the national rankings of the GameDay Challenge, which include both stadium and tailgate materials, Ohio State improved its ranking from 20th to 11th in diversion rate and from 9th to 6th in recycling.

These efforts have also extended outside the stadium, with a renewed focus on diverting waste from tailgate lots. For additional information about Ohio State’s zero waste and sustainability efforts, please visit:

  • Zero waste at Ohio State
  • Ohio Stadium zero waste process
  • Ohio State Sustainability Goals

For more information of the GameDay Recycling Challenge, please visit: http://gamedaychallenge.org.

A ton of food of food scraps is composted at Delaware’s Price Farm Organics after every OSU home football game.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2017/04/web1_DSCF9095.jpgA ton of food of food scraps is composted at Delaware’s Price Farm Organics after every OSU home football game.

Staff Reports

Price Farms Organics receives OEPA grant

The Ohio EPA awarded $1.35 million in recycling market development grants to eight projects from around Ohio that include assistance with the creation and expansion of organic recycling facilities and equipment purchases for recycling facilities and manufacturers. As a result, more material will be diverted from regional waste streams including plastics, glass and fiber. The projects are expected to create 13 new jobs.

Businesses are eligible for funding, but must be sponsored by a public entity, such as a municipality, county, township or solid waste management district.

Projects approved for funding include (rounded to the nearest dollar):

· Price Farm Organics, in partnership with the Delaware, Knox, Morrow and Marion County Solid Waste District, $250,000 to purchase a portable horizontal grinder with conveying stacker and compost screener to undertake organic recycling for the community.

· Kitchen Aid, in partnership with the Darke County Solid Waste District, $44,433 grant to purchase eight vertical balers that will allow the company to convert waste material into usable feedstock for their production system.

· Econopia, in partnership with Franklin County, $250,000 to purchase an organics in-vessel processing unit to assist with organic recycling at the facility in Columbus.

· Barnes Nursery, in partnership with the Lorain County Solid Waste District, $66,538 to purchase two food waste trucks to assist processing organic recycling for Ottawa, Seneca, Sandusky, Huron, Erie, Lorain and Cuyahoga counties.

· I.D. Images, in partnership with Medina County Solid Waste Management District, $108,027 to purchase a horizontal auto tie baler and label stock used to prepare the material for the waste to energy market.

· G.I.B., in partnership with the Ottawa, Sandusky and Seneca Solid Waste District, $138,195 to purchase a recycling truck and 12 commercial roll-off containers to provide recycling services for commercial establishments.

· Waste Management, in partnership with Summit and Akron Solid Waste Management Authority, $250,000 to purchase a bag breaking unit and optical sorter for the Akron Materials Recovery Facility.

· Zanesville Energy, in partnership with The Ohio State University, Zanesville, $250,000 to purchase an organics depackaging system to allow organics recycling at the University branch campus and servicing of other organic material generators.

Ohio EPA is responsible for implementing statewide waste reduction, recycling market development and litter prevention programs. All Ohioans are encouraged to reduce waste, recycle materials and buy recycled content products to make recycling in Ohio even more successful.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency was created in 1972 to consolidate efforts to protect and improve air quality, water quality and waste management in Ohio. Since then, air pollutants dropped by as much as 90 percent; large rivers meeting standards improved from 21 percent to 89 percent; and hundreds of polluting, open dumps were replaced with engineered landfills and an increased emphasis on waste reduction and recycling.

For additional information about the grant program, visit www.recycleohio.gov and www.epa.ohio.gov.

For additional information about the grant program, visit www.recycleohio.gov and www.epa.ohio.gov.