Otterbein professors participate in research published in top professional publication finding STEM teaching techniques lacking in classrooms


Otterbein professors participate in research published in top professional publication finding STEM teaching techniques lacking in classrooms

WESTERVILLE, OHIO—Otterbein University faculty were a part of a recent study published in Science, a renowned professional journal, analyzing over 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering and math. The study found that 55 percent of STEM classroom interactions consisted of conventional lecturing, which prior research has proved to be the least effective teaching strategy among students.

Four Otterbein faculty members received a National Science Foundation grant for their portion of the research in 2013. These faculty members are: Joan Esson, associate professor of chemistry; Kathryn Plank, director, Otterbein Center for Teaching and Learning; Paul Wendel, associate professor of education; and Anna Young, associate professor, director of Zoo and Conservation Science program.

“A student active classroom is a better environment for students to learn,” said Esson. “The results show that colleges need more faculty training and higher standards for teachers to practice student centered experiential learning.”

Otterbein has a long history of questioning the status quo of education. Founded in 1847 as a liberal-arts institution, Otterbein was one of the nation’s first universities to welcome women and people of color to its campus. It is one of the first colleges in the nation founded as a co-education institution enabling women to pursue the same fields of study of their male counterparts.

The research has been published in Science Magazine, Inside Higher Education and Science Daily.

Otterbein University is a private university nationally recognized for its intentional blending of liberal arts and professional studies through its renowned Integrative Studies curriculum and its commitments to experiential learning and community engagement. Otterbein recently launched Kindness Matters, an initiative in partnership with Kind Columbus at The Columbus Foundation, in its effort to cultivate and inspire kindness throughout the greater Columbus region. Otterbein is a recipient of the 2015 Carnegie Community Service Classification; a finalist for the 2014 President’s Award for Economic Opportunity Community Service; and has been honored With Distinction by the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll since the list’s inception in 2006. It stands in its category’s top 15 percent in U.S. News & World Report’s guide to “America’s Best Colleges.” It also is recognized in national rankings by Forbes and The Wall Street Journal. Otterbein offers more than 70 undergraduate majors; six master’s programs; and a doctorate in nursing practice (DNP). Its picturesque campus is perfectly situated in Westerville, Ohio, America’s fifth friendliest town (Forbes), just minutes from Columbus, the 14th largest city in the country. Otterbein’s commitment to opportunity started with its founding in 1847 as one of the nation’s first universities to welcome women and persons of color to its community of teachers and learners, which now numbers 2,400 undergraduate and 500 graduate students. Otterbein remains committed to its relationship with the United Methodist Church and its spirit of inclusion, and welcomes people of all backgrounds to Otterbein’s Model Community. To learn more about Otterbein, visit www.otterbein.edu.

www.otterbein.edu

Otterbein offers more than 75 majors and 44 minors, as well as eight graduate programs. Talk to an admissions counselor today to get started with your future.

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