Conservative revolt over immigration sinks House farm bill


Staff and Wire Reports



Rep. Dave Brat, R-Va., a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, smiles before the vote on the House farm bill which failed to pass, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The Freedom Caucus opposed the measure, seeking leverage to obtain a vote on a hard-line immigration plan. Last week’s display of anarchy among House Republicans on immigration underscores how problematic and risky the issue is for a GOP that badly needs unity heading into November elections that will decide control of Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Rep. Dave Brat, R-Va., a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, smiles before the vote on the House farm bill which failed to pass, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The Freedom Caucus opposed the measure, seeking leverage to obtain a vote on a hard-line immigration plan. Last week’s display of anarchy among House Republicans on immigration underscores how problematic and risky the issue is for a GOP that badly needs unity heading into November elections that will decide control of Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)


House Chief Deputy Whip Rep. Patrick T. McHenry, R-N.C., is surrounded by reporters as he walks to the chamber for a highly contested vote on the farm bill, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The whips are part of the House leadership team and are responsible for helping round up votes for party-backed legislation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)


Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., emerges from the chamber just after key conservatives in the rebellious House Freedom Caucus helped to kill passage of the farm bill which had been a priority for GOP leaders, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The 213-198 vote is an embarrassing blow to House Republican leaders, who had hoped to tout its new work requirements for recipients of food stamps. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)


By ANDREW TAYLOR and LISA MASCARO

Associated Press

Sunday, May 20

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republican leaders suffered an embarrassing setback Friday when conservatives scuttled an ambitious farm bill, part of a high-stakes power play as they once again exert their oversized sway in the House.

In this case, conservatives in the House Freedom Caucus wanted to slow the momentum of bipartisan immigration legislation to help young “Dreamers.” Republican moderates are gaining ground with their immigration effort and conservatives don’t like the deals taking shape. By withholding their votes on the farm bill, they flexed their political muscle to doom both.

Not even a tweet from President Donald Trump supporting the farm bill could save it from the chaos Friday. It was defeated, 213-198. Some 30 Republicans joined with every chamber Democrat in opposition.

The vote was a blow to GOP leaders, exposing the power struggle underway as leaders jockey to replace Speaker Paul Ryan, who is not seeking re-election. It disrupts GOP efforts to portray party unity ahead of the midterm election and to rack up legislative wins to motivate voters to the polls to keep their majority.

Trump is “disappointed in the result of today’s vote” and “hopes the House can resolve any remaining issues,” said Deputy Press Secretary Lindsay Walters.

The outcome also shelves for now the big, five-year farm bill, a top GOP priority because it combines stricter work and job training requirements for food stamp recipients — long pushed by Ryan as part of his safety net cuts — with a renewal of farm subsidies popular in GOP-leaning farm country.

Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., a veteran campaign strategist, said it’s a “mistake” for conservatives to play the farm and immigration bills against each other. “You don’t hold one thing hostage for something that’s totally different,” he said.

Conservatives, though, have gained clout in the House by withholding their block of some 30 votes to exert their sway on legislation. That strategy is only expected to escalate as they jockey for promotions up the leadership ladder once Ryan retires.

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a leader of the House Freedom Caucus who has expressed an interest in running for House speaker, said some conservatives had concerns over the farm bill, largely because of its spending, but “my main focus was making sure we do immigration policy right.”

Democrats are strongly opposed to the farm bill, saying the stricter work and job training rules are poorly designed and would drive 2 million people off food stamps. They took a victory lap after the vote.

Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md. said the dysfunction under the Republican majority in Congress is another reason why voters in November “are going to give us their jobs.”

The farm bill’s rejection scrambled the prospects for what had seemed to be an agreement over the immigration standoff.

House Republicans, including Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., worked into the night trying to negotiate a resolution and some thought they had a reached a deal. It would have allowed rival immigration bills to proceed to the floor by late June.

One bill from hard-liners would reduce legal immigration and open the door to Trump’s border wall with Mexico. A second, being negotiated with the White House, GOP leaders and Democrats, would be aimed at and bolstering border security and helping young “Dreamer” immigrants — those who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children — to remain permanently in the U.S.

The accord was aimed at heading off a drive by moderates who are just five Republican signatures short on a petition to force votes on a bipartisan immigration bill Democrats would likely support.

The deputy whip, Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., said it was only when he arrived on the floor Friday that he realized the farm bill would come up short. He said the conservative flank is “trying to extract something” more on immigration.

But Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., the head of the Freedom Caucus, told reporters there was “no deal” on immigration. He downplayed the setback on the farm bill, saying “it’s not a fatal blow. It’s just a reorganizing.”

The scramble will likely drive more Republicans to sign on to the renegade effort to push the compromise immigration bill to a floor vote over the objection of party leaders.

Conservatives defended their move, saying they are standing for voters who want Trump’s border wall and other stricter immigration measures and want assurances that GOP leaders would not help an overly moderate immigration bill clear the House. Said Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa., a Freedom Caucus member, “The farm bill was just a casualty, unfortunately.”

But Republican Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart of Florida, who supports both the farm bill and the immigration effort, said the conservatives once again played into the hands of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, joining Democrats in dooming the GOP bill.

“Nancy Pelosi and her allies just won a big victory,” he said.

As for the farm bill’s fate, the debacle appears to make it even more likely that Congress will simply extend the current farm bill when it expires in September.

In the Senate, Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., is promising a competing bill later this month. He’s signaling that its changes to food stamps would be far more modest than the House measure.

Associated Press writers Matthew Daly and Alan Fram in Washington contributed to this report.

Ohio State News

Buyer beware: Some water-filter pitchers much better at toxin removal

Study finds some purifiers remove twice the microcystins from risky water

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Water pitchers designed to rid water of harmful contaminants are not created equal, new research has found.

Scientists from The Ohio State University compared three popular pitcher brands’ ability to clear dangerous microcystins from tap water. They found that while one did an excellent job, other pitchers allowed the toxins – which appear during harmful algal blooms (HABs) – to escape the filter and drop into the drinking water.

The purifier that filtered water fastest, and which was made entirely of coconut-based activated carbon, removed 50 percent or less of the microcystins from the water. But the purifier that filtered water slowest – and which was made from a blend of active carbon – rendered the microcystins undetectable in drinking water. The study appears in the journal Water Science Technology: Water Supply.

“Because drinking-water treatment plants also use activated carbon, I figured that these home filters might also remove some microcystins, but I wasn’t expecting results this good and such big differences among the pitchers,” said Justin Chaffin, the study’s lead author and a senior researcher and research coordinator at Ohio State’s Stone Laboratory. Stone Lab is located on Lake Erie and serves as a hub for researchers throughout the Midwest working on issues facing the Great Lakes.

Toxin-producing harmful algal blooms (HABs) have become a global threat to drinking water. Microcystins are among the most common toxins that arise from these cyanobacterial blooms, posing a significant risk to animal and human health. Adverse reactions to the toxins can range from a mild skin rash to serious illness or death as a result of damage to the liver or kidneys.

In Ohio, microcystins in Toledo’s water supply left more than 400,000 residents without tap water for several days in 2014.

“Since then, many residents drink bottled water and others rely on these filtration pitchers as backup, in case the water treatment plants miss a return of the microcystins,” Chaffin said. No such threats to the water have been detected since the 2014 incident, he said.

“At public events, residents kept asking me ‘Does my water pitcher remove microcystins?’ and my answer was always, ‘I don’t know,’” Chaffin said.

So he designed a study to answer the question.

The researchers do not name the brands in the study, but they are commonly found in retail outlets and ranged in price from about $15 to about $50, Chaffin said. Interested consumers can compare the study findings to the features of an individual pitcher to inform their purchasing decisions, he suggested.

“In general, the cheaper the pitcher, the worse job it did filtering out the toxins,” Chaffin said.

Chaffin and his collaborators used contaminated Lake Erie water, which they diluted to various concentrations of microcystins, and then ran through three common pitchers designed to purify water. Consistently, slow filtration and a combination of different types of activated carbon proved most helpful.

The idea behind the pitchers is that the activated carbon in the filter “grabs” bad things from the tap water as they bind to the carbon molecules.

When water with a microcystin concentration of 3.3 micrograms per liter was run through the three filters, its concentration dipped in all cases, but was only undetectable in one pitcher – the slowest-filtering model. The researchers chose that concentration to mimic the concentration reported during the 2014 do-not-drink advisory in Toledo.

“Contact time really seems to matter. If you run the water through really fast, the microcystins and other organic molecules don’t have time to bind to the carbon molecule and stick to the filter,” Chaffin said.

Contact time varied from a little more than two minutes per liter (for the worst-performing pitcher) to more than six minutes per liter (for the best). The middle-of-the-road pitcher filtered water at a rate of almost four minutes per liter.

The two most-effective pitchers had filters made of a blend of activated carbon sources. The least-effective pitcher’s filter was made entirely of coconut-based active carbon.

The research team also tested whether the microcystins stayed put on expired filters by running ultra-clean deionized water through the purifier.

“We didn’t find the microcystins in that filtered water at all, so there’s a pretty good chance that what’s being removed is stuck to the filter for good,” Chaffin said.

That said, he suggested that these purifying pitchers be viewed as a safety net for those who are worried about microcystins going undetected at the drinking-water treatment plants – not in cases where there’s been a warning and people have been told to stick to bottled water.

“But when there isn’t a warning, these filters are much cheaper and better for the environment in the long run than bottled water. You aren’t creating mountains of empty bottles,” Chaffin said.

Other Ohio State researchers involved with the study were Erica Fox, Callie Nauman and Kristen Slodysko.

The study was supported by the Lake Erie Protection Fund.

Written by Misti Crane

30% of residential water utility customers indicate they have water quality issues — J.D. Power

2018 Water Utility Residential Customer Satisfaction Study from JD. Power

This study, now in its third year, measures satisfaction among residential customers of 88 water utilities, delivering water to a population of at least 400,000 people and is reported in four geographic regions: Midwest, Northeast, South and West. Overall satisfaction is measured by examining 33 attributes within six factors (listed in order of importance): delivery; price; conservation; billing and payment; communications; and customer service.

The key finding is that 30% of residential water utility customers indicate they have water quality issues, a rate far higher than what has typically been reported in the EPA’s Consumer Confidence Reports produced by local water authorities. Among the 30% of residential water utility customers who mention a quality problem, 12% cite low pressure; 11% cite bad taste; 8% cite scaling/water hardness; 8% cite discoloration; 6% cite bad smell; and 4% cite high lead/mineral content. There’s also a reported wide variation in water quality across the nation.

Problems with water quality and other issues can cause customer satisfaction to drop, which can be remedied by better and more frequent communication.

Subtle hearing loss while young changes brain function, study finds

Early damage could open door to dementia, lead author says

May 22, 2018

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Cranking up your headphones or scrambling for a front-row spot at rock shows could be damaging more than your hearing.

New research from The Ohio State University has found that young people with subtle hearing loss – the kind they aren’t even aware of – are putting demands on their brains that typically wouldn’t be seen until later in life.

“Hearing loss, even minor deficits, can take a toll in young people – they’re using cognitive resources that could be preserved until much later in life,” said lead researcher Yune Lee, an assistant professor of speech and hearing science at Ohio State. “Most concerning, this early hearing loss could pave the way for dementia.”

The study appears online in the journal eNeuro.

Lee and his collaborators recruited healthy men and women who were 18 to 41 years old so that they could monitor their brain activity while the subjects listened to various sentences. The structure of the sentences varied in difficulty because the researchers wanted the 35 participants’ brains to have to work harder to comprehend some of the messages.

The original study was designed to look just at brain differences when sentence complexity increased – something that is possible with use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), technology that allows scientists to measure and map brain activity.

But the research team stumbled upon a surprising discovery. Before the fMRI tests, the researchers tested participants’ hearing to make sure there weren’t any problems that would interfere with the study. Some of the young people had subtle hearing deficits, but nothing serious enough to exclude them from the research.

As it turned out, those with minor hearing deficits had fMRI results that took an unexpected turn. Lee and his colleagues were expecting brain activity in the left hemisphere of the brain. But in the subjects with subtle hearing decline, the fMRI was showing activity in the right hemisphere as well – in the right frontal cortex, to be exact.

“This isn’t about the ear – it’s about the brain, the cognitive process, and it shouldn’t be happening until people are at least older than 50,” he said.

As part of the natural aging process, humans begin to use more of their right frontal brain to process language. But in healthy young people, the left side is wholly responsible for language comprehension.

“But in our study, young people with mild hearing decline were already experiencing this phenomenon,” Lee said. “Their brains already know that the perception of sound is not what it used to be and the right side starts compensating for the left.”

It’s unclear what this means for people as they age, but Lee said he is concerned that tapping into the right brain so early in life could mean worse hearing comprehension with age.

And he’s especially worried about the link between hearing loss and dementia.

“Previous research shows that people with mild hearing loss are twice as likely to have dementia. And those with moderate to severe hearing loss have three to five times the risk,” Lee said.

“We can’t be sure, but we suspect that what happens is you put so much effort into listening you drain your cognitive resources, and that has a negative effect on your thinking and memory and that can eventually lead to dementia.”

Lee said young people should take their hearing health seriously and understand that there could be serious repercussions down the road if they don’t. And it’s important to recognize that risks arise from routine exposures, such as listening to music on portable players and attending live music events, he said.

“Letting this process happen early in your life could be like spending your retirement money when you’re in your 30s,” Lee said. “You’re going to need that down the road.”

Written by Misti Crane

Study: More than 50 percent of men moonlight at some point

Moonlighters are productive at both jobs, but may encounter family conflicts

People who moonlight a second job are just as productive and engaged as their one-position counterparts. However, moonlighting may lead to family conflict — possibly due to the number of hours spent outside the home, says a new study from Ball State University.

Ball State’s Bryan Webster, a management professor, led a multi-university research group to examine the long-held notion that moonlighters are more likely to be tired and devoid of energy. The study, “Is Holding Two Jobs Too Much? An Examination of Dual Job Holders,” was recently published in Springer’s Journal of Business and Psychology.

Webster noted that little research has been done on the issue of job performance by moonlighters despite that some 7.2 million Americans were classified as dual jobholders in 2016 by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

A dual jobholder is defined as a person who works for and receives income from two different organizations, or who works for and receives income from one organization and is self-employed in another job.

Webster and his research team conducted two studies. First, they compared the level of work engagement dual jobholders exhibit at their primary job to the level of work engagement they exhibit at their second job. In a second study, they interviewed a sample of teachers and bartenders, comparing those who hold only one job to those who hold two jobs about work behaviors and attitudes.

Researchers found that dual jobholders do not report lower levels of work engagement at the second job compared to the primary job while the difference between primary job work engagement and second job work engagement was not statistically significant.

“In general, it appears that dual jobholders are able to perform as adequately as their single jobholding counterparts,” Webster says. “However, dual jobholders reported higher levels of work-family conflict as compared to single job employees.”

Webster notes that maintaining a work-life balance may be difficult for some people working two jobs, leading to family conflicts.

Dual jobholders work an average of 46.8 hours per week as compared to the average American employee who works 38.6 hours per week. More than 50 percent of men engage in dual jobholding at some point in their lives, and men and women currently participate in dual jobholding at equal rates, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Webster believes the study is one of the first to provide a scientific examination of the popular notion that holding two jobs is detrimental to individuals and organizations and said this research provides evidence organizations may not need to enact policies to prevent individuals from undertaking a second job.

“However, given the negative personal effects of holding two jobs — such as higher work-family conflict — organizations may be inclined to enact policies that help dual jobholders strike a healthy balance between work life and home life,” Webster said. In particular, organizations employing a high rate of dual jobholders may want to develop such policies “and encourage managers to engage in an open dialog regarding the benefits and consequences of holding two jobs.”

Nationwide Children’s Hospital

May 21, 201

New Study Finds that U.S. Poison Control Centers Receive 29 Calls Per Day About Children Exposed to ADHD Medications

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – A new study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital found that there were more than 156,000 calls to US Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to attention – deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications among children and adolescents 19 years of age and younger from January 2000 through December 2014, averaging 200 calls each week or 29 calls per day.

The study, published online today in the journal Pediatrics, found that while the number of calls about ADHD medication exposures among children and adolescents fluctuated throughout the years of the study there was on overall increase of 61% during the study period.

The increase in calls coincided with an increase in ADHD diagnoses and medication prescriptions during the same time period nationally.

“Pediatric exposures to ADHD medications are an increasing problem in the US, affecting children of all ages,” said Gary Smith, MD, DrPH, the senior author of the study and director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “We need to do more to prevent these esposures.”

The majority of calls were about children 12 years of age and younger (76%).

Among children younger than 6 years old, most exposures were associated with the exploratory behavior seen in that age group, for example, accessing improperly stored medications. Exposures among children 6-12 years were most often associated with therapeutic errors, such as taking or being given too much medication, a dose too soon after the previous dose, or the wrong medicine.

Among teenagers (13-19 years), about half of reported exposures were intentional abuse/misuse or suspected suicide attempt. As a result, the exposures in this age group were more likely to lead to serious outcomes than those among younger children.

“In young children, it is exploratory behavior and access to the medication bottle, while in school age children it is usually the busy family schedule and a double-dosing medication error,” said Rick Spiller, coauthor and director of the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “In adolescents it tends to be an intentional exposure. The strategies to prevent these events change as the child gets older, but the risks of a problem remain.”

Overall, most (about 60%) of exposed individuals did not receive treatment in a health care facility, and about 25% were treated/evaluated and released. About 6% were admitted to a hospital for medical treatment and there were 3 deaths.

While only about 28% of exposure calls had clinical effects reported, the most common clinical effects were agitation/irritability (11%), rapid heart rate (10%), drowsiness/lethargy (3%), high blood pressure (3%), and vomiting (2%).

Methylphenidate and amphetamine medications each accounted for about 45% of exposures.

Data for this study were obtained from the National Poison Data System, which is maintained by the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC). The AAPCC receives data about calls to poison control centers that serve the US and its territories.

Poison control centers receive phone calls through the Poison Help Line and document information about the product, route of exposure, individual exposed, exposure scenario, and other data.

The Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP) of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital works globally to reduce injury-related pediatric death and disabilities. With innovative research at its core, CIRP works to continually improve the scientific understanding of the epidemiology, biomechanics, prevention, acute treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries. CIRP serves as a pioneer by translating cutting edge injury research into education, policy, and advances in clinical care. For related injury prevention materials or to learn more about CIRP, visit www.injurycenter.org.

The Central Ohio Poison Center provides state-of-the-art poison prevention, assessment and treatment to residents in 64 of Ohio’s 88 counties. The center services are available to the public, medical professionals, industry, and human service agencies. The Poison Center handles more than 42,000 poison exposure calls annually, and confidential, free emergency poisoning treatment advice is available 24/7. To learn more about the Poison Center, visit www.bepoisonsmart.org.

The Ohio State University

Reclaiming the American Dream

The Ohio State University is partnering with Schmidt Futures to launch the Alliance for the American Dream — a collaboration aimed at ensuring true social mobility, true equality of opportunity and a true middle class that is attainable and sustainable.

Remember the middle class?

It’s the backbone of the American economic structure. That illustrious place at the intersection of hard work and perseverance where families can be economically secure. Anyone who strives for it is told that they can attain it.

But across Ohio, and across our country, the middle class is fading away.

“More than 30 percent of households believe they are less than $2,000 away from falling into a financial crisis, if they were faced with a temporary job loss or a sudden medical expense.”

Ohio State Professor Elena Irwin

Not only is America the place where everyone has the freedom and opportunity to succeed — it’s also the belief in upward mobility and being able to accomplish whatever you set your mind to.

Those ideas — those beliefs and visions of the fabled American dream — are disappearing.

“We are absolutely thrilled to join the Alliance and to partner with individuals and communities on this important and timely endeavor. It’s ‘The Columbus Way’ in action.”

Dr. Michael V. Drake, Ohio State President

Through the Alliance for the American Dream, Ohio State will lead a community-wide partnership to help middle class families thrive. With $1.5 million from Schmidt Futures, we will find, develop and test the best new ways not only to strengthen the middle class, but help our families thrive.

Our goal is lofty, yet attainable: give 10,000 families a 10-percent net income boost by 2020. That means we’ll work to increase wages or make things such as housing and daycare more affordable.

But for this work to truly take off, for us to reach our goal, we’ll need your help.

Ohio State and our partners are seeking innovative ideas, and we encourage you to get involved. We need members of our communities, thought leaders, business leaders and university to join together to bring these ideas to light and life.

The American dream is still attainable, not a thing of the past. Not fleeting. And our goal is to prove it.

Community Idea Submission

We need your help and input to create versatile, multifaceted solutions. Starting June 1, 2018, you’ll be able to submit your ideas to help tackle this growing problem.

Until then, please provide your email address below to keep up to date with the latest information and events.

Together, we can bolster the middle class, ensure our country has a strong economic backbone and keep the American Dream alive.

Our vision: Equitable growth and sustainable, resilient communities

The American Dream, at its core, is comprised of upward mobility and equitable growth. By middle class, we don’t mean just middle income, but also enabling access to the things we associate with a middle class lifestyle.

Those include adequate health care, child care, education, housing and transportation—and sufficient economic security (a well-paying job, savings, a retirement plan). Families need the ability to handle emergency expenses and make long-term plans.

At the core of this approach is the goal of creating a future of shared prosperity through equitable growth. We need strategies that both:

Bolster the ability to grow and remain within the middle class

Ensure equal opportunity and equal access

Our approach: Growing the middle

We aim to generate innovative ideas for local families that increase economic opportunities for those in danger of falling out of the middle class, and also stabilize and expand the middle class. To do so, we emphasize two pathways:

PATHWAY #1: Greater upward mobility of lower-income earners who are without the economic securities of the middle class.

PATHWAY #2: Greater stability for those middle class individuals who are economically vulnerable and at risk of falling out of the middle class.

In the initial phases of this work, we are seeking innovative strategies that have the strongest potential to meet a specific goal:

Raise the net incomes of 10,000 households by 10% by 2020 in targeted Ohio communities.

Submitted strategies can focus on households, communities or employers, or may be a hybrid approach that combines these in creative ways:

HOUSEHOLDS: People-based strategies that seek to directly increase income or reduce expenses. These may include direct payments that reduce expenses and facilitate income growth and stability. There can be strategies to reduce household debt through assistance with student loans or mortgages, while other strategies can strive to protect households from financial shocks, such as increased savings and access to liquidity.

COMMUNITIES: Place-based strategies that seek to increase household net incomes through investments in a particular neighborhood or community. These may include investments in transportation, infrastructure or facilities. Or perhaps they’re investments in community-based organizations that link residents to education, workforce training programs and employment opportunities.

EMPLOYERS: People or place-based strategies that seek to increase household income by growing local businesses, employee job skills or entrepreneurship. These may include business incubators, local business retention/expansion initiatives and public investments, e.g., in education, technology or infrastructure, that will spur a “crowding in” of private investment.

We will use this guiding framework to develop a solicitation process that will inspire a range of creative thinking and effective partnerships among academic communities, engineers, scientists, policymakers, investors and community advocates.

We will cast a broad net to surface a multitude of innovative ideas and then work with proposal teams to further develop and hone ideas.

On June 1, 2018, we will ask the communities at large to submit their best solutions and suggestions. From many ideas that are submitted, 10 proposals will be further developed and three selected for potential investment.

Ohio State Leadership

Michael V. Drake, MD

President

Dr. Michael V. Drake’s service in higher education spans nearly four decades and includes senior leadership roles at universities and national organizations dedicated to advancing education. He became the 15th president of The Ohio State University on June 30, 2014.

During his tenure, Ohio State has seen record highs in applications, graduation rates, academic excellence, diversity and donor support, and increases in NIH and NSF research funding. The university has received national recognition for its commitment to teaching and learning as well as excellence in patient safety and clinical outcomes at the university’s Wexner Medical Center.

The Time and Change strategic plan, launched in August 2017, aspires to further strengthen Ohio State’s position as a national flagship public research university, setting forth five areas of broad focus: teaching and learning; access, affordability and excellence; research and creative expression; academic health care; and operational excellence and resource stewardship.

Bruce A. McPheron

Executive Vice President and Provost

As executive vice president and provost, Bruce A. McPheron is Ohio State’s chief academic officer. In this role, he is responsible for the administration and strategic planning, development and review processes for the university’s academic mission.

McPheron’s leadership more specifically includes oversight of 15 colleges, five campuses and more than 7,000 tenure-, clinical-, research-track and associated faculty.

In addition, he oversees academic programs for 66,046 undergraduate, graduate and professional students, more than 200 majors and almost 13,000 courses, along with the support of a library system with 5.8 million volumes in its collection and electronic access to 48 million books and journals.

A professor of entomology, he has taught undergraduate and graduate courses, including courses in international agriculture. His research has focused on the use of genetic tools to examine population structure in pest insects of global quarantine significance and resulted in extensive fieldwork on multiple continents.

His work is widely published in peer-reviewed publications and, among his many national recognitions and honors, he is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. As an academic leader, he has been instrumental in connecting faculty and other researchers in innovative collaborations across disciplines, including the creation of the Field to Faucet water quality initiative and assisting in the creation of the Discovery Themes initiative, both at Ohio State.

Trevor Brown

Dean, John Glenn College of Public Affairs

Dean Brown previously served as the director, interim director and associate director for Academic Affairs and Research at the John Glenn School of Public Affairs. From 1994 to 2013, he served in managerial roles for the Parliamentary Development Project, a U.S. Agency for International Development funded organization that provided technical assistance to the Ukrainian parliament.

His research and teaching focus on democratization and democratic institutions, the organization of government to deliver programs and policies, public sector contracting and contract management, and organizational strategy.

He has published his research in a variety of academic outlets including Cambridge University Press, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Public Administration Review and the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory. His recently co-authored book, Complex Contracting — Government Purchasing in the Wake of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Deepwater Program, won the 2014 American Society of Public Administration’s Section on Public Administration Research Best Book Award.

In 2013, he won the National Institute of Governmental Purchasing’s Scholar of the Year award. In 2014, he was inducted as a fellow in the National Academy of Public Administration.

He also has provided advice and conducted analysis for a variety of organizations, including the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Eurasia Foundation, the Peace Keeping and Stability Operations Institute at the Army War College, the Small Business Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, the U.S. Coast Guard, the IBM Center for the Business of Government, the Government Accountability Office, the Pew Center on the States, the Department of the Navy’s Naval Post Graduate School and the National Institute of Governmental Purchasing.

His research has been cited by the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Bloomberg News and the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

Elena Irwin

Professor, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics

Elena Irwin is the faculty director of the Sustainable and Resilient Economy (SRE) Program at Ohio State. Her research focuses on the sustainability of communities and urban-rural regions, with a focus on the economics of land use change and integrated models of ecosystem services in urban, urbanizing and agricultural regions.

She has been PI or Co-PI on multiple research projects totally over $17 million in funding, including funding from the National Science Foundation, NOAA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, as well as private foundations. She is an elected board member of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and member of the U.S. EPA Board of Scientific Councilors for the Sustainable and Healthy Communities Program.

In her capacity as SRE faculty director, she provides thought leadership to this comprehensive interdisciplinary program aimed at catalyzing research, teaching and engagement in sustainability science at Ohio State across natural, physical and social sciences, engineering, public health, planning and policy.

She leads the overall strategic direction, including cultivating campus-wide collaborative research teams, partnering with academic units to recruit and mentor new SRE faculty, and working with faculty and staff to develop partnerships with stakeholders and extramural funding opportunities.

Jay Sayre

Assistant Vice President and Director, Innovation for the Institute for Materials Research

Jay Sayre leads the translation of knowledge and assets from the institute to solve the world’s most pressing problems in the 21st century. He is also an adjunct professor in Materials Science and Engineering where his interdisciplinary research interests are in translating science into products within the fields of applied mechanics and materials engineering.

Specifically, his focus is on polymers and composites, fuel cells, electrode structures, advanced threat armor, dynamic mechanical analysis, fracture analysis and innovation models, tools and practices.

Prior to joining Ohio State, Sayre held the positions of director of advanced materials and internal research and development at Battelle Memorial Institute in Columbus, Ohio, which is the world’s largest, independent research and development organization.

He is an inventor of several commercialized technologies in the areas of fuel cells, impact barriers and vehicle armor. He has held numerous security clearances, including a Department of Defense Top Secret.

W. Randy Smith

Vice Provost, Academic Programs

W. Randy Smith joined the Office of Academic Affairs in 1994 as the university’s first provost’s faculty fellow, and in that capacity, coordinated Ohio State’s decennial institutional re-accreditation process. Subsequently, he was named associate provost, and since 1998 has been vice provost for academic programs (formerly, curriculum and institutional relations).

His current portfolio focuses on academic program development and review for the university’s 15 colleges and four regional campuses. In that capacity: he coordinated the university’s conversion from a quarter to semester calendar from 2009 to 2012; oversaw two subsequent successful institutional re-affirmation of accreditation processes, in 2007 and 2017; and currently is helping lead a review of the general education program.

In addition, he is heavily involved — in terms of both policy and practice — with the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s statewide initiatives on articulation and transfer among the state’s 36 two-year and four-year public colleges and universities. He has been extensively committed to, and involved in, national professional organizations, statewide committees and task forces and university governance throughout his career at the university.

He received the Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1990 and was honored, in 1997, as one of the initial recipients of the Faculty Award for Distinguished University Service.

A member of Ohio State’s Department of Geography since 1978, Vice Provost Smith specializes in urban geography, especially urban historical geography and urban and regional systems.

Community Idea Submission

We need your help and input to create versatile, multifaceted solutions. Starting June 1, 2018, you’ll be able to submit your ideas to help tackle this growing problem.

The Ohio State University’s Process

The university will pair its capabilities, knowledge and research strengths with those of our community partners at large. By doing so, we will lead the overarching community through an idea generation process aimed at yielding bold, impactful and sustainable solutions to this complex issue.

Our aim is to have members of our communities, thought leaders, business leaders and university join together to generate ideas that will improve the lives of middle class families in Ohio by 2020 — extending to communities across the United State in the years to come.

The provided timeline shows the process through the end of 2018. Updates and milestones will be shared when they occur.

Timeline

May

Initiative launches

June

Generate ideas

July

Idea review

August

Develop ideas

September

Develop ideas

October

Idea review

November

Submission of top 10 ideas to Ohio State faculty leadership

December

Ohio State submits top three ideas to Schmidt Futures

Community Idea Submission

We need your help and input to create versatile, multifaceted solutions. Starting June 1, 2018, you’ll be able to submit your ideas to help tackle this growing problem.

Together, we can bolster the middle class, ensure our country has a strong economic backbone and keep the American Dream alive.

Rep. Dave Brat, R-Va., a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, smiles before the vote on the House farm bill which failed to pass, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The Freedom Caucus opposed the measure, seeking leverage to obtain a vote on a hard-line immigration plan. Last week’s display of anarchy among House Republicans on immigration underscores how problematic and risky the issue is for a GOP that badly needs unity heading into November elections that will decide control of Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/05/web1_120574970-38551dfe7cae403a82043feeae40989d.jpgRep. Dave Brat, R-Va., a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, smiles before the vote on the House farm bill which failed to pass, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The Freedom Caucus opposed the measure, seeking leverage to obtain a vote on a hard-line immigration plan. Last week’s display of anarchy among House Republicans on immigration underscores how problematic and risky the issue is for a GOP that badly needs unity heading into November elections that will decide control of Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

House Chief Deputy Whip Rep. Patrick T. McHenry, R-N.C., is surrounded by reporters as he walks to the chamber for a highly contested vote on the farm bill, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The whips are part of the House leadership team and are responsible for helping round up votes for party-backed legislation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/05/web1_120574970-021c6a39a5f54ad7956ed980625c56c0.jpgHouse Chief Deputy Whip Rep. Patrick T. McHenry, R-N.C., is surrounded by reporters as he walks to the chamber for a highly contested vote on the farm bill, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The whips are part of the House leadership team and are responsible for helping round up votes for party-backed legislation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., emerges from the chamber just after key conservatives in the rebellious House Freedom Caucus helped to kill passage of the farm bill which had been a priority for GOP leaders, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The 213-198 vote is an embarrassing blow to House Republican leaders, who had hoped to tout its new work requirements for recipients of food stamps. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/05/web1_120574970-c482a090ed894fb195f58f6edd0bbe4c.jpgSpeaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., emerges from the chamber just after key conservatives in the rebellious House Freedom Caucus helped to kill passage of the farm bill which had been a priority for GOP leaders, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, May 18, 2018. The 213-198 vote is an embarrassing blow to House Republican leaders, who had hoped to tout its new work requirements for recipients of food stamps. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Staff and Wire Reports

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