Are there Trump tapes?


Staff & Wire Reports



FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, Tom Arnold attends the premiere of "Dead Ant" in Los Angeles.  Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former attorney, retweeted a photo posing with Arnold, who is working on a show to hunt down recordings of the president. The photo fueled speculation Friday, June 22, 2018, that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, Tom Arnold attends the premiere of "Dead Ant" in Los Angeles. Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former attorney, retweeted a photo posing with Arnold, who is working on a show to hunt down recordings of the president. The photo fueled speculation Friday, June 22, 2018, that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)


File - In this May 30, 2018 file photo, attorney Michael Cohen arrives to court in New York. President Donald Trump's former attorney retweeted a photo posing with comedian Tom Arnold, who is working on a show to hunt down recordings of the president. The photo fueled speculation Friday, June 22, 2018, that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)


Cohen’s photo with Tom Arnold fuels Trump tape speculation

By MICHAEL BALSAMO

Associated Press

Friday, June 22

LOS ANGELES (AP) — President Donald Trump’s personal attorney Michael Cohen retweeted a photo of himself with comedian Tom Arnold, who is working on a TV show to hunt down recordings of the president, fueling speculation Friday that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them.

Last month, Vice Media announced that Arnold would be featured in a new show called “The Hunt for the Trump Tapes” and would investigate rumored recordings of the president.

Arnold told NBC News on Friday that he met with Cohen at the Lowes Regency Hotel in Manhattan and they discussed the new show.

“We’ve been on the other side of the table and now we’re on the same side,” Arnold told NBC. “It’s on! I hope he (Trump) sees the picture of me and Michael Cohen and it haunts his dreams.”

Arnold tweeted the photo with Cohen and the caption “I love New York” on Thursday night and Cohen retweeted it without comment.

The idea for the show, which is set to air on Viceland later this year, came about after the release of the “Access Hollywood” tape during the 2016 presidential election, which captured Trump bragging about grabbing women’s genitals. In announcing the show last month, Vice said Arnold would “draw on his high-profile network of celebrity friends, entertainment executives, and crew members he’s met over more than 35 years in showbiz to dig for evidence on Trump’s most incriminating moments.”

“I say to Michael: ‘Guess what? We’re taking Trump down together,’ and he’s so tired he’s like, ‘OK,’ and his wife is like, ‘OK, (expletive) Trump,’” Arnold told NBC.

Arnold tweeted Friday to clarify that it was him who said he was teaming with Cohen to “take down” Trump and that Cohen was not being paid by Vice. Cohen replied, “Thank you Tom for correcting the record.”

For more than a decade, Cohen was Trump’s personal lawyer and fixer, and he has long been a key power player in the Trump Organization and a fixture in Trump’s political life. He regularly threatened lawsuits against those who could pose a challenge to Trump, and a day before the FBI raided his office and hotel room, he tweeted, “I will always protect my POTUS.”

Last week, Trump said he hadn’t spoken with Cohen “in a long time” and said, “He’s not my lawyer anymore, but I always liked Michael.”

Cohen’s attorney, Guy Petrillo, did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment Friday. A publicist for Arnold referred an inquiry from The Associated Press to a Vice Media spokesman, who didn’t immediately comment.

Cohen is under investigation by federal officials in New York. His home, office and hotel room were raided by the FBI in April as part of a probe into his business dealings. Investigators are also looking into a $130,000 payment made as part of a confidentiality agreement with porn actress Stormy Daniels, who alleges she had an affair with Trump in 2006, which Trump denies. She is suing both Cohen and Trump in an attempt to invalidate the nondisclosure agreement.

Daniels’ former attorney, Keith Davidson, has sued Cohen and alleges he illegally recorded their telephone calls when Davidson represented Daniels. The lawsuit, filed earlier this month in Los Angeles, provided no proof to substantiate the claims and no details on exactly when the calls were recorded.

LOCAL NEWS

New City Park

The new public park will be located at 480 S. Hempstead Rd., Westerville.

Family Fun Nights at Westerville City Hall

Liven up your Thursday nights with Westerville Parks and Recreation. Bring the family for the first-ever Family Fun Night on the City Hall Courtyard, 21 S. State St., on Thursday, June 7 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Staff will be on hand with entertainment, games and treats like popcorn and sno-cones.

These free events are scheduled every other Thursday through August 2.

Construction Updates: Cleveland Avenue/Schrock Road Improvements

Work to improve traffic flow and safety near Cleveland Avenue and Schrock Road continues.

Single lane closures may be needed for lane striping. Please watch for signage directing traffic in the area.

Learn more about this and other projects around the City on the GoWesterville interactive map.

Attorney General DeWine Issues Annual Ohio Missing Children Clearinghouse Report

More than 700 Children are Currently Listed as Missing in Ohio

20,043 Missing Children Reports

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—In recognition of National Missing Children’s Day, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine released the 2017 Ohio Missing Children Clearinghouse Report, which documents that 20,043 children were reported missing in Ohio in 2017.

“Fortunately, around 98 percent of the children reported missing in 2017 were found safe, but some children are still missing,” said Attorney General DeWine. “Protecting Ohio’s families, particularly children, has always been one of my top priorities. We will continue to work with local law enforcement and family members to do all we can to bring Ohio’s missing children home.”

A full copy of the report can be found on the Ohio Attorney General’s website.

In cases where the circumstances surrounding a disappearance were reported by local law enforcement, 42 cases involved an abduction by a non-custodial parent and 12 cases involved an abduction by a stranger.

The clearinghouse also documented 41 attempted child abductions involving 30 girls and 11 boys in 2017. Of incidents in which the suspect’s method of attempted abduction is known, 37 percent used physical force or a weapon; 30 percent offered the children a ride; 15 percent tried to entice the children with candy or an animal (such as a “lost puppy”); and 18 percent engaged the children in conversation by asking for directions or help.

“Parents should regularly talk with their kids about what to do if approached by a stranger,” said Attorney General DeWine. “In most of these attempted abduction cases, the suspects were in a vehicle. Make sure your children are aware that they should never get near a car driven by someone they don’t know.”

There are currently more than 700 children listed as missing in the Ohio Attorney General’s Missing Children Database.

Attorney General DeWine today also announced the winners of this year’s National Missing Children’s Day Poster Contest. Each year, fifth graders across the state are eligible to submit a poster to the Attorney General’s Office that raises awareness about child safety. The winners were recognized this month as part of the Attorney General’s Two Days in May Conference on Victim Assistance. This year’s winners are:

The Ohio Missing Children Clearinghouse was established by the Ohio General Assembly in 1993 as a central repository for statistics and information about missing children in the state. Attorney General DeWine’s Ohio Missing Persons Unit was developed in 2011 to better coordinate and convey information about services related to missing children and adults. The unit operates the Ohio Missing Children Clearinghouse and is part of the Attorney General’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation.

Attorney General DeWine Releases Interim Report on Pilot Program Helping Families Overcome Substance Abuse Issues and Reducing Childhood Trauma

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine released the Ohio START Interim Report, tracking the progress of the Ohio START (Sobriety, Treatment, and Reducing Trauma) Pilot Program. Ohio START is an intervention program that provides specialized victims services, such as intensive trauma counseling to children who have suffered victimization due to parental drug use. The program also connects parents to drug addiction.

“Children are the most vulnerable victims of the opioid epidemic. Through the START program we are supporting these kids, as well as helping their parents get the treatment they need to overcome their addiction. The goal is to be able to reunite families, and reduce trauma for children,” said Attorney General DeWine. “Through the pilot program, families in 17 hard-hit counties are receiving the care, support, and wrap-around services they need to put them on the road to long-term success.”

Since Ohio START launched in March 2017, pilot counties have:

  • Received more than $400,000 in funding from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office.
  • Undergone more than 1,900 combined hours of training.
  • Demonstrated a high level of readiness for implementation.
  • Employed 20 individuals in recovery as family peer mentors.
  • Identified nearly five dozen families for Ohio START services.
  • Served 47 families and more than 125 individuals through Ohio START.
  • Had no families withdraw from the program, with the first Ohio START family scheduled to graduate from the program later this month.

Ohio START brings together children’s services, juvenile courts, and behavioral health treatment providers to support families struggling with co-occurring child maltreatment and substance abuse. In addition, family peer mentorship is a critical part of the program. The mentors are individuals who have personal experience with addiction, who have achieved sustained recovery, and who have had prior engagement with the child welfare system as a child or a parent. They provide accountability, support, and serve as role models for parents.

The multi-year pilot program is funded through a $3.5 million Victims of Crime ACT (VOCA) grant from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office which will be shared among the pilot counties. Those counties include: Athens, Brown, Clinton, Fairfield, Fayette, Franklin, Galia, Hamilton, Highland, Hocking, Jackson, Lawrence, Meigs, Pickaway, Ross, Vinton, and Warren.

Ohio START is also supported by Casey Family Programs; the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, through a federal 21st Century Cures grant; United Healthcare Community Plan of Ohio; and the HealthPath Foundation of Ohio.

The Ohio State University College of Social Work and the Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs at Ohio University are donating their time and resources to conduct a full evaluation of the pilot, which will be available at the pilot’s conclusion.

A copy of the full interim report is available on the Ohio Attorney General’s website at www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov. Watch a video on the Ohio Attorney General’s YouTube Channel to learn more about the Ohio START Program.

VIEWS

Can the World Wide Web be saved?

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/07/the-man-who-created-the-world-wide-web-has-some-regrets

A Different Perspective on Peace

By Kent D. Shifferd

Think of where we are, on a very special, tilted planet that revolves on its own axis every 24 hours while it is circled by a moon that moves around it every 27 days, and both are circling the sun every 365 days, and the sun and all its planets are part of the spiral barred galaxy we call the Milky Way, which is revolving around its own axis once every 250 million years which means that our incredible little planet is racing through space, carried along by the galactic revolution or Cosmic Year, at a speed of 500,000 per hour or 12 million miles per day. Try to picture all these simultaneous movements in your mind.

We are on the outer edge of just one galaxy in a universe of 100 billion galaxies, a tiny dot in measureless space. And yet, and yet… this incredible planet has life, indeed is a living planet encased in a web of creatures dependent on one another and all functioning to support the whole miraculous enterprise. And here we humans are, conscious of all this, which ought to be both overwhelmingly humbling and awe-inspiring to the point of putting us on our knees. To think that we are a part of this almost inconceivable cosmic dance leaves me breathless. And I say to myself, how can we possibly harm one another and the whole web of life, for as far as we know there is no such other planet like earth, and if there is, it’s too far away to get to. This is it, here on this rapidly moving miracle planet. So, to put it simply, let’s all get along together and nurture the unique systems of life which support us in this remote but awesome place in the universe.

Kent Shifferd, syndicated by PeaceVoice,is the author of From War to Peace: A Guide to the Next Hundred Years and former Executive Director of the Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies.

LOCAL NEWS

Advisory: Union County Engineers will be chip sealing this week. Check https://www.co.union.oh.us/news for the updated schedule

Carmen Winant named first Roy Lichtenstein Chair of Studio Art

Ohio State University

July 9, 2018

World-renowned artist to join Department of Art faculty at Ohio State

COLUMBUS, Ohio – After a national search, Carmen Winant, a Columbus-based visual artist and writer whose work has been celebrated across the world, has been named the first Roy Lichtenstein Chair of Studio Art in the Department of Art at The Ohio State University. Winant will join the faculty this August.

Currently an assistant professor of history of art and visual culture at the Columbus College of Art & Design (CCAD), Winant uses her collages, installations and writings to offer critical insights on female experiences. Her work has been featured in exhibitions nationally and internationally — most recently at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, where her installation “My Birth” is currently on view as part of MoMA’s Being: New Photography 2018 exhibit. Winant’s work has also been covered extensively by the press, including in The New Yorker and Vogue.

“I am thrilled to join the Department of Art at Ohio State and to honor the legacy of Roy Lichtenstein, a pioneering artist and former Ohio State student and faculty member,” said Winant. “The department’s dedicated and inspiring commitment to teaching makes it an ideal home for me. Moreover, Lichtenstein’s creative practice — based in experimentation, rigor and appropriative strategies — has influenced my own work as an artist and a critical writer.”

Dorothy Lichtenstein and the board of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation established the Roy Lichtenstein Chair of Studio Art last year as part of a $6 million endowed gift to Ohio State. In addition to creating the studio art chair that Winant will hold, the gift also created the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Endowed Chair of Art History. A search for the endowed chair of art history has begun and will continue until the position is filled.

Roy Lichtenstein, one of the most influential and innovative artists of the second half of the 20th century, is preeminently identified with pop art, a movement he helped originate. Lichtenstein received his BFA and master’s degrees at Ohio State in 1946 and 1949, respectively, and taught studio art classes at the university in the late 1940s and early 1950s. After his death in 1997, the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation was created to facilitate public access to his work and to develop and educate the next generation of artists, curators, critics and scholars.

“All of us in the family and the foundation are delighted with the appointment of Carmen Winant to be the first Roy Lichtenstein Chair of Studio Art,” said Dorothy Lichtenstein, president of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation and Roy’s widow. “Roy’s artistic career began at Ohio State, and he was nurtured, and positively stimulated, by his professors. We would hope that the current and next generations of art students, and maybe even students in other disciplines, will be inspired by our Roy Lichtenstein Chair, as we ‘pay forward.’”

“The Department of Art is extremely pleased and proud to welcome Carmen Winant as the inaugural Roy Lichtenstein Chair of Studio Art,” said Michael Mercil, professor in the Department of Art, who served as interim chair of the department during the search. “Winant’s work in a variety of contemporary art forms, as well as her substantial engagement with critical writing, fits perfectly with our own aspirations to expand interdisciplinary art practices. In the spirit of Roy Lichtenstein’s legacy of innovative and original experimentation, Winant crosses fluidly between disciplines and works in a range of material and conceptual forms.”

Winant received her BA from UCLA and master’s degrees in critical studies and fine arts from the California College of the Arts. In 2010, she was a resident at the Skowhegan School of Painting in Sculpture. While on the faculty at CCAD, she received Excellence in Teaching Awards in both 2016 and 2017.

FILE – In this Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, Tom Arnold attends the premiere of "Dead Ant" in Los Angeles. Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former attorney, retweeted a photo posing with Arnold, who is working on a show to hunt down recordings of the president. The photo fueled speculation Friday, June 22, 2018, that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120809794-a4d6ddcd76c94a87a190499df1708754.jpgFILE – In this Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, Tom Arnold attends the premiere of "Dead Ant" in Los Angeles. Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former attorney, retweeted a photo posing with Arnold, who is working on a show to hunt down recordings of the president. The photo fueled speculation Friday, June 22, 2018, that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

File – In this May 30, 2018 file photo, attorney Michael Cohen arrives to court in New York. President Donald Trump’s former attorney retweeted a photo posing with comedian Tom Arnold, who is working on a show to hunt down recordings of the president. The photo fueled speculation Friday, June 22, 2018, that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120809794-ba3bf462026a4105bbdeeaf4ed934299.jpgFile – In this May 30, 2018 file photo, attorney Michael Cohen arrives to court in New York. President Donald Trump’s former attorney retweeted a photo posing with comedian Tom Arnold, who is working on a show to hunt down recordings of the president. The photo fueled speculation Friday, June 22, 2018, that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Staff & Wire Reports