Apps have changed the world


Staff & Wire Reports



FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2009 file photo, a poster touting applications available for Apple's iPhone and iPod touch is seen at the Macworld Conference and Expo in San Francisco. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2009 file photo, a poster touting applications available for Apple's iPhone and iPod touch is seen at the Macworld Conference and Expo in San Francisco. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)


FILE - In this Monday, June 4, 2018 file photo, Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, Calif. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)


FILE - This March 19, 2018 file photo shows Apple's App Store app in Baltimore. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)


NEWS

How Apple’s app store changed our world

By MICHAEL LIEDTKE

AP Technology Writer

Tuesday, July 10

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A decade ago, Apple opened a store peddling iPhone apps, unlocking the creativity of software developers and letting users truly make their mobile devices their own.

The resulting explosion of phone apps — there are now more than 2 million for the iPhone alone — has changed daily life for billions of people around the world.

It has unleashed new ways for us to work and play — and to become so distracted that we sometimes forget to look up from our screens. It has created new industries — think ride-hailing services like Uber, which would be unimaginable without mobile apps — and pumped up demand for software developers and coding schools.

But it has also opened the door to an age of technology anxiety, rife with concerns that apps are serving us a little too well and holding our attention whether we want them to or not.

IN THE BEGINNING

None of that was going on when Apple’s app store debuted 10 years ago Tuesday. At the time, mobile phones were largely a take-it-or-leave it proposition, with features programmed by their manufacturers and customization mostly limited to a choice between tinny electronic ringtones.

The iPhone itself was still in its infancy, with only 6 million devices sold during the device’s first year. Then came the App Store, which offered 500 programs users could take or leave themselves. During its first weekend, people downloaded 10 million apps — many of them games.

Apple competitors Google, Amazon and Microsoft soon launched their own app stores. Together, these companies now offer roughly 7 million apps . Apple, meanwhile, has now sold more than a billion iPhones.

THE APP ECONOMY

That app tsunami, and the riches it generated, spawned new economic opportunities. Billions of dollars flowed into startups dependent on their apps, from Uber to Snapchat to Spotify to game makers like Angry Birds creator Rovio. Opportunities for software developers blossomed as well.

Apple perhaps benefited most of all. Its “free” apps usually display advertising or make money from subscriptions or other in-app purchases, while others charge users to download. Apple takes a cut of this action, sometimes as much as 30 percent.

The app store is now the fastest growing part of Apple’s business. Together with other Apple services, the app store generated $33 billion in revenue over the year that ended in March. The company says it has paid out more than $100 billion to developers during the past decade.

THE OTHER SIDE OF APPS

For all the possibilities apps have allowed, there’s also a dark side.

The Center for Humane Technology, an advocacy group formed by early employees of Google and Facebook, charges that many apps are engineered specifically to capture our attention, often to our detriment. That makes them “part of a system designed to addict us ,” the group says.

Apple says it shares similar concerns. To help, the company is adding new tools to the iPhone to track and control the usage of the most time-consuming apps.

COOL LINK

2018 FORD RAPTOR VELOCIRAPTOR 6X6 IS A TRUE BEAST

VIEWS

Opinion: Cops Have Been Losing Tech Race, but That’s Changing

By Jonathan Haggerty and Arthur Rizer

InsideSources.com

A 16-year-old landed in jail last week for allegedly gunning down a man in cold blood on a road in Stockton, California.

During the same time, Terry Emerson found himself behind bars after Stockton police found three illegal handguns in his car during a traffic stop.

These events, while unfortunate, would not be out of the ordinary for an area that has historically struggled with crime. Of particular interest, however, is how these men were tracked: using a police surveillance drone.

In the pop culture of decades past, criminals always had the edge. Barney Fife caricatures would lose to criminals wielding Tommy guns, and John Dillinger-style gangsters handily evaded chase in their souped-up getaway cars. Indeed, at least in the opinions of law enforcement representatives, the technical balance of power has traditionally favored the bad guys.

But in this brave new world of drones, self-driving cars and artificial intelligence, police officers could soon gain the advantage. And though this trend doesn’t necessarily foreshadow some dystopian police state, given cops’ checkered history with Americans’ constitutional rights, civil liberties advocates will have to play a crucial role in balancing the scales of power between officer and citizen.

Back in July 2016, when the Dallas Police Department sent in a police robot rigged with C4 to take out the shooter who killed five officers and injured seven others, as well as two civilians, it marked the first time police had used a bomb robot to kill someone. The department had obtained the robot through the Pentagon’s 1033 program, which allows law enforcement agencies to buy surplus military equipment from the Department of Defense. By 2016, state and local law enforcement agencies across the country had acquired 628 of these robots.

Today, Taser International Inc. is exploring how to outfit drones with cameras and stun guns. The company has held discussions with police officials about deploying these devices for law-enforcement work. Drones aren’t limited to larger departments, either; even smaller law enforcement agencies are readily using this technology.

Launching robots from self-driving cars sounds like something straight out of Bruce Wayne’s Batcave, but autonomous police vehicles are not a distant reality. Taser Inc. has also received inquiries into the feasibility of deploying bots from autonomous police vehicles.

And while Robocop will not be kicking in doors on no-knock warrants any time soon, the idea is in the works. The Knightscope K5 is a fully-autonomous surveillance bot with facial recognition and license-plate-scanning ability. It can capture audio and video, test the air for chemicals and distinguish “suspicious activities” from normal behavior. The K5 doesn’t use weapons, but a new line of “mechanical officers” could breach doors and hold live weapons. The Greensboro Police Department in North Carolina claims the department brings in 60 calls per year for which these robots may be suited.

The Marshall Project, a nonprofit news organization that covers the criminal justice system, interviewed criminal justice and technology experts who note that this emerging technology could drastically change policing. Bernard Levin, co-author of 2011’s “The Future of Policing,” anticipates that drones and ubiquitous traffic cameras could one day determine the identity of a bank robber in minutes. And catching him would be just as easy. “With fully autonomous cars and highways all interconnected, roads and vehicles could simply be powered off,” Levin told The Marshall Project. Alternatively, authorities could disable the suspect’s getaway car remotely.

The challenge of this new era of police technology will be to respect civil liberties and maximize the good applications of emerging tech while minimizing its scarier uses. A robot with facial-recognition technology could deliver a phone and a pizza to an armed man on a freeway overpass threatening suicide, but it could also be used to surveil illegally innocent civilians. Civil libertarians are right to worry about the depersonalization effects of robots or drones operated by remote officers. In one case gone wrong, a police robot burned down a Tennessee mobile home when it dropped tear-gas grenades in the living room — one of which exploded, engulfing the home in flames.

Of course, a skeptic of the cops-winning-the-tech-arms-race narrative could argue that any enterprising criminal can use the same technologies that police departments are prototyping. But the average criminal doesn’t have access to nearly the same quantity or quality of tools that some departments are acquiring. Emerging technologies thus have the potential to shift drastically the capabilities of police departments vis-a-vis everyday Americans.

Indeed, Terry Emerson and the murder suspect from Stockton lacked the means to respond to police drone surveillance with drones of their own. Whether this is a good thing for society will depend on how well police balance the constitutional rights of citizens with their new gadgets. Citizens and communities will need to advocate for both accountability and transparency without unreasonably restricting law enforcement capabilities.

We’re far from witnessing the beginnings of a Hunger Games-style totalitarian future, but that doesn’t give law enforcement carte blanche to use powerful technologies however they prefer. In a world of high-tech cops, guarding our civil liberties is more important than ever.

ABOUT THE WRITERS

Arthur Rizer is the director of criminal justice policy at the R Street Institute. Jonathan Haggerty is a criminal justice policy associate with the R Street Institute. They wrote this for InsideSources.com.

FROM FACEBOOK

News Reporters have found that Russians secretly financed the Trump Tower Toronto!

“Mitch McConnell Heckled Out of Restaurant for Second Time in Two Days.”

trump is meeting privately with Putin because that’s how job performance evaluations are usually done.

NATO President to Trump: “Appreciate your allies, you don’t have many”

WAPO: Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh incurred tens of thousands of dollars of credit card debt buying baseball tickets over the past decade and at times reported liabilities that could have exceeded the value of his cash accounts and investment assets, according to a review of Kavanaugh’s financial disclosures. Great! He sounds like a really stable person.

In Kavanaugh’s difficult confirmation in 2004 for the DC court of appeals, he LIED to the senate during the hearings. Said he was not involved in Dubya’s torture and detainment program but that was a lie. Letters were sent to him but never answered. It was even referred for criminal prosecution but that never happened either.

Socialism is alive and happy on Wall Street: the rich get socialism; everyone else gets capitalism for the losses and crumbs.

Rep. Jim Jordan cries ‘fake news’ as 9th abuse victim comes forward.

Now it’s out that the Brexits movement in England was funded by Russian money, Seems Mr. Putin’s influences are spreading chaos world wide!

Feinstein on Twitter: Benczkowski refuses to recuse himself from the Russia investigation despite having worked for a Russian bank under investigation for ties to Trump. He also pushed for Comey’s firing to AG Sessions while serving on the Trump transition team. Those are clear conflicts of interest.

Wikipedia: Brian Allen Benczkowski (born October 5, 1969) is an American lawyer. Currently a partner at Kirkland & Ellis, he is President Donald Trump’s nominee to become Assistant Attorney General for the Criminal Division of the United States Department of Justice.

Kavanaugh nomination being investigated as possible obstruction of justice?

Russian state-run TV is gleefully reporting that Trump is driving a wedge into the western alliance, something they have never been able to do.

Watch Mike Pence get heckled in Kansas today. “Mike where are the children? Shame on you,” yelled one man in the crowd. This kind of thing needs to continue until these hateful people are out of the White House

GEORGE SOROS, IS JUST A DEMOCRAT THAT CONTRIBUTES TO THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY, PERIOD. THERE ARE NO VALID ACCUSATIONS AGAINST HIM, THERE ARE ONLY REPUBLICAN LIES AND THE MINDLESS FOOLS THAT FALL FOR THEM… THE CONs ATTACK A DIFFERENT DEMOCRAT EVERY WEEK. WAKE UP.nomination being investigated as p

LINKS

The President Is Mentally Unwell — and Everyone Around Him Knows It

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/01/trump-is-mentally-unwell-and-everyone-around-him-knows-it.html

How Donald Trump Shifted Kids-Cancer Charity Money Into His Business

https://www.forbes.com/sites/danalexander/2017/06/06/how-donald-trump-shifted-kids-cancer-charity-money-into-his-business/#66b5d7676b4a

Donald Trump ranked worst president in US history by nearly 200 political scientists

https://www.yahoo.com/news/donald-trump-ranked-worst-president-215700182.html

It’s Done: Trump Signs HJR 69 into Law Allowing Slaughter of Alaskan Bear Cubs, Wolf Pups

http://www.environews.tv/040517-done-trump-signs-hjr-69-law-allowing-slaughter-alaskan-bear-cubs-wolf-pups/

DNC Rules Committee Votes To Gut Power Of Superdelegates

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/dnc-superdelegates-vote-change_us_5b451df2e4b07aea7545118e?ncid=engmodushpmg00000003

News

Report: Trump Had Been Negotiating with Anthony Kennedy for Months Over New SCOTUS Pick

Ed Krassenstein

By

Ed Krassenstein

Published on July 10, 2018

https://hillreporter.com/report-trump-had-been-negotiating-with-anthony-kennedy-for-months-over-new-scotus-pick-3529

Senate confirms justice official who worked for Russian bank

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/article214703710.html

‘Never thought I’d see this!’ Russian state TV gushes Trump is doing Putin’s job of wrecking NATO for him

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/07/never-thought-id-see-russian-state-tv-gushes-trump-putins-job-wrecking-nato/

Walmart’s Newly Patented Technology For Eavesdropping On Workers Presents Privacy Concerns

https://www.buzzfeed.com/carolineodonovan/walmart-just-patented-audio-surveillance-technology-for?utm_term=.ubRG2db53#.avWNGyM8W

Senate confirms Trump DOJ nominee with ties to Russian bank

http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/senate/396540-senate-confirms-trump-doj-nominee-with-ties-to-russian-bank

Donald Trump’s China Tariffs Don’t Apply to Ivanka

http://fortune.com/2018/07/09/donald-trumps-china-tariffs-dont-apply-to-ivanka/

At Deutsche Bank, Justice Anthony Kennedy’s Son Loaned Trump $1 Billion

https://www.democracynow.org/2018/7/2/headlines/at_deutsche_bank_anthony_kennedys_son_loaned_trump_1_billion

Russian Company Uses Trump’s Face To Sell Toxic Products

https://www.carbonated.tv/news/russian-company-uses-trumps-face-to-sell-toxic-products

9th Accuser: I told GOP Rep Jordan about sexual abuse, Jordan laughed & refused to help

http://americablog.com/2018/07/9th-accuser-i-told-gop-rep-jordan-about-sexual-abuse-he-refused-to-help.html

Trump pardons father-and-son ranchers who set fires on federal lands

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/donald-trump/trump-pardons-father-son-ranchers-who-set-fires-federal-lands-n880741

or Second Time in

o Days.”

FILE – In this Jan. 6, 2009 file photo, a poster touting applications available for Apple’s iPhone and iPod touch is seen at the Macworld Conference and Expo in San Francisco. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120913956-43fa52468eee4114b0f9b6cf1b2be94d.jpgFILE – In this Jan. 6, 2009 file photo, a poster touting applications available for Apple’s iPhone and iPod touch is seen at the Macworld Conference and Expo in San Francisco. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

FILE – In this Monday, June 4, 2018 file photo, Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, Calif. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120913956-c94bd8e53a9a4c5696601e4f08de8009.jpgFILE – In this Monday, June 4, 2018 file photo, Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, Calif. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

FILE – This March 19, 2018 file photo shows Apple’s App Store app in Baltimore. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120913956-807e442ef26a4792886da92a93de9a72.jpgFILE – This March 19, 2018 file photo shows Apple’s App Store app in Baltimore. Since its debut 10 years ago Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Apple’s app store has unleashed new ways for us to work, play, and become lost in our screens. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Staff & Wire Reports