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In this frame from video, porn actress Stormy Daniels is led into jail in Columbus, Ohio., after being taken into custody during a Wednesday evening, July 11, 2018, show. Daniels was arrested at a strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday, July 12. (WBNS via AP)

In this frame from video, porn actress Stormy Daniels is led into jail in Columbus, Ohio., after being taken into custody during a Wednesday evening, July 11, 2018, show. Daniels was arrested at a strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday, July 12. (WBNS via AP)


This photo provided by the Franklin County Sheriff's Office on Thursday, July 12, 2018, shows porn actress Stormy Daniels. Daniels was arrested at a Columbus, Ohio strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday. (Franklin County Sheriff's Office via AP)


FILE - In this May 23, 2018 file photo, porn actress Stormy Daniels speaks during a ceremony for her receiving a City Proclamation and Key to the City in West Hollywood, Calif. Daniels was arrested at an Ohio strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday, July 12. While Daniels was performing at Sirens, a strip club in Columbus, some patrons touched her in a “non-sexual” way, her lawyer, Michael Avenatti, told The Associated Press. An Ohio law known as the Community Defense Act prohibits anyone who isn’t a family member to touch a nude or semi-nude dancer. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)


OHIO NEWS

Police say they made an ‘error’ in arresting Stormy Daniels

By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS

Associated Press

Friday, July 13

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Prosecutors on Thursday dropped charges against porn star Stormy Daniels just hours after she was arrested and accused of illegally rubbing undercover police officers’ faces against her bare breasts during a performance at a strip club.

Her attorney said she was “set up” in a Columbus police sting operation, calling it an “absurd use of law enforcement resources.” Police said they routinely conduct such undercover operations.

The 39-year-old adult film star, who claims to have had sex with Donald Trump before he became president, was charged with three misdemeanors, each punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine upon conviction. She was released on $6,000 bail around daybreak Thursday.

By early afternoon, prosecutors said they were dropping the case because Ohio’s law against physical contact between strippers and customers applies only to someone who “regularly” performs at a club. In Daniels’ case, it was her first appearance at Sirens in Columbus.

A person who answered the phone at Sirens declined to comment.

Columbus police chief Kim Jacobs said “one element of the law was missed in error.”

“A mistake was made, and I accept full responsibility,” she said.

Officers were well within their area of responsibility when making the arrests, she added. But she said the officers’ motivations will be reviewed internally. Without providing details, she said unsubstantiated allegations about their motivations were circulating on social media.

Daniels’ lawyer called for an investigation into the arrest, saying some of the officers had what appeared to be “very Pro-Trump” social media pages. The lawyer, Michael Avenatti, tweeted screenshots from what he claimed was the Facebook page of one officer with a pseudonym and asked people to help confirm it.

Daniels considered reappearing at Sirens but later opted for a different club, Vanity Gentlemen’s Club. She performed there for about 20 minutes early Friday, baring her breasts but not physically interacting with any patrons. A host had announced: “No phones, no photography, no touching!”

About 100 patrons were in the club and threw dollar bills on her as she performed, partly covering the stage.

Police said Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, smacked the faces of two female officers and one male officer with her bare breasts during the Wednesday night show. Officers knocked on the door of her tour bus after the performance and took her into custody in an arrest that Avenatti said left her “traumatized and rattled.”

She was booked under a 10-year-old state law known as the Community Defense Act, which says dancers at “sexually oriented” businesses are prohibited from touching customers and vice versa.

Police said two other dancers were arrested along with Daniels. Prosecutors will decide whether to pursue charges against those women.

Police said Daniels’ arrest was part of a long-term human trafficking investigation of adult clubs. They said they have made numerous arrests under the no-touching law but did not immediately provide a number.

The police department “engages in these operations routinely,” spokesman Sgt. Dean Worthington said.

Franklin County Municipal Court records show 23 similar cases this year, including the charges against Daniels, 14 last year and six the year before.

Daniels has said she had sex with Trump in 2006, when he was married. Trump has denied it. Before the election, she was paid $130,000 to stay silent in a deal handled by Trump’s personal attorney Michael Cohen. She is suing to invalidate the nondisclosure agreement.

Associated Press writers Michael Balsamo in Los Angeles, Catherine Lucey in Washington, Lisa Cornwell in Cincinnati and Bob Lentz in Philadelphia contributed to this report.

A day after arrest, Stormy Daniels dances but doesn’t touch

By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS

Friday, July 13

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Stormy Daniels danced — but she didn’t touch — at an Ohio strip club a day after her arrest at another club for interacting too closely with patrons who turned out to be undercover police officers.

Prosecutors on Thursday dropped charges against the porn star hours after she was accused of illegally rubbing undercover police officers’ faces against her bare breasts during her performance.

Her attorney said she was “set up” in a Columbus police sting operation, calling it an “absurd use of law enforcement resources.” Police said they routinely conduct such undercover operations.

The 39-year-old adult film star, who claims to have had sex with Donald Trump before he became president, was charged with three misdemeanors. She was released on $6,000 bail around daybreak Thursday.

By early afternoon, prosecutors said they were dropping the case because Ohio’s law against physical contact between strippers and customers applies only to someone who “regularly” performs at a club. In Daniels’ case, it was her first appearance at Sirens in Columbus.

Columbus police chief Kim Jacobs said “one element of the law was missed in error.”

“A mistake was made, and I accept full responsibility,” she said.

The officers’ motivations will be reviewed internally. Without providing details, she said unsubstantiated allegations about their motivations were circulating on social media.

Daniels’ lawyer called for an investigation into the arrest, saying some of the officers had what appeared to be “very Pro-Trump” social media pages. The lawyer, Michael Avenatti, tweeted screenshots from what he claimed was the Facebook page of one officer with a pseudonym and asked people to help confirm it.

Daniels considered reappearing at Sirens but later opted for a different club Thursday night, Vanity Gentlemen’s Club. She performed there for about 20 minutes, baring her breasts but not physically interacting with any patrons. A host had announced: “No phones, no photography, no touching!”

About 100 patrons were in the club and threw dollar bills on her as she performed, partly covering the stage.

After her Sirens show, officers knocked on the door of her tour bus and took her into custody in an arrest that Avenatti said left her “traumatized and rattled.”

She was booked under a 10-year-old state law known as the Community Defense Act, which says dancers at “sexually oriented” businesses are prohibited from touching customers and vice versa.

Police said two other dancers were arrested along with Daniels. Prosecutors will decide whether to pursue charges against those women.

Police said Daniels’ arrest was part of a long-term human trafficking investigation of adult clubs. They said they have made numerous arrests under the no-touching law but did not immediately provide a number.

The police department “engages in these operations routinely,” spokesman Sgt. Dean Worthington said.

Franklin County Municipal Court records show 23 similar cases this year, including the charges against Daniels, 14 last year and six the year before.

Daniels has said she had sex with Trump in 2006, when he was married. Trump has denied it. Before the election, she was paid $130,000 to stay silent in a deal handled by Trump’s personal attorney Michael Cohen. She is suing to invalidate the nondisclosure agreement.

Associated Press writers Michael Balsamo in Los Angeles and Catherine Lucey in Washington contributed to this report.

Produce Safety Consultations Now Available for Ohio Growers

Ohio Department of Agriculture

Today, 11:38 AMBudzak, Gary L

Free, one-on-one training offered by Ohio Department of Agriculture

REYNOLDSBURG, OH (July 13, 2018) –The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is now offering produce growers FREE, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved consultations to help farmers comply with the upcoming Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety rule.

ODA’s Division of Food Safety, through a cooperative agreement with the FDA, is responsible for enforcing the Produce Safety rule in Ohio. Farm inspections will begin in the spring of 2019, but prior to inspections, ODA staff is offering these voluntary consultation visits to help growers identify what steps they may need to take to comply with the Produce Safety rule before regulatory inspections begin.

Farms can request a farm consultation visit to determine specific requirements to their farm. This service is offered as a one-day course that provides one-on-one training in which trained and certified ODA staff will visit farms and walk growers through what will be expected with new federal regulations on their farm. In addition to the consultation, farms will also receive resource materials that will help aid in compliance.

Growers unsure if their farm is subject to the Produce Safety rule, can review FDA’s FSMA regulation document or contact ODA for additional assistance. Produce farms that are exempt from the rule are welcome to schedule consultation visits, as some of the requirements are similar to those required by third party food safety auditors.

FSMA, which was signed into law on January 4, 2011, is the most comprehensive reform of the nation’s food safety laws since 1938. Its goal is to better protect public health by shifting U.S. food supply safety efforts from a response approach to one of prevention. FSMA is comprised of seven rules that span the entire food supply chain. Of these rules, the one most likely to impact produce growers is the Produce Safety rule.

For more information on FSMA, the Produce Safety rule or to schedule your on-farm consultation visit agri.ohio.gov or call (614) 600-4272.

Ohio State relocates regional recruitment office in downtown Cleveland

July 13, 2018

Space will foster engagement with prospective students, high-school counselors

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio State University has relocated its only regional undergraduate student recruitment office to the Global Center for Health Innovation in downtown Cleveland.

The new location features an open, flexible space plan that will enable staff to engage with prospective students, high-school guidance counselors and community organizations in one-on-one meetings and at group events throughout the recruitment process.

The regional office will build upon the enhancements to northeast Ohio recruitment that resulted from the launch of Ohio State’s first Cleveland recruitment office, which opened in Terminal Tower in 2013.

“We want this new office to be looked at as the Ohio State point of contact and presence in Northeast Ohio,” said Vern Granger, director of undergraduate admissions. “If you are interested in Ohio State, want to meet with someone or have questions, this is the place to go.”

After central Ohio, northeast Ohio is the largest feeder of new first-year and transfer students for Ohio State’s Columbus and regional campuses. The university expanded the target recruitment area for the regional office in 2015 from Cuyahoga and Lorain counties to an 11-county region stretching from the metro Cleveland area south to Akron and from the Pennsylvania state border west to counties that border Lake Erie.

The regional office’s presence to date has led to significant increases in applicants from Lorain and Cuyahoga counties as well as increases in enrollment from those two counties, especially on the Mansfield campus. Freshman enrollment of Cuyahoga and Lorain county residents increased by 5.4 and 1.7 percent, respectively, on the Columbus campus between autumn 2013 and autumn 2017, and by 38.2 and 100 percent, respectively, on the Mansfield campus among applicants selecting Mansfield as their first Ohio State choice.

Expectations are high that the improved access in the new location will not just grow northeast Ohio recruitment, but also enable the university to connect in a more meaningful way with prospective students and families.

“It’s not only about numbers on a spreadsheet,” said Keith Gehres, director of outreach and recruitment for undergraduate admissions. “It’s about reaching talented students in the region who may not even be considering college and showing them that an Ohio State education is available to them. It’s about fulfilling the university mission to create opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds and to help them succeed.”

The regional office has been essential to forging important relationships with community organizations and high schools, Gehres noted.

“Having a physical presence in northeast Ohio is seen within the counselor community as a real commitment on the part of Ohio State to recruit and enroll students throughout the region,” he said.

Ohio State also works with college access and success organizations College Now Greater Cleveland, which assigns staff to Cleveland-area schools, and the Higher Education Compact of Greater Cleveland, a consortium that includes the city of Cleveland, the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, Cuyahoga County government, 16 public and private colleges, and civic groups and foundations.

The Terminal Tower space was donated by Forest City Enterprises, a real estate company led by former Ohio State trustee Ronald A. Ratner.

“We will always be grateful to Mr. Ratner for his generous donation of premium downtown space that enabled us to expand student recruitment in this area of the state,” Granger said.

Two full-time staff members work in the Cleveland office. Ohio State also employs regional recruiters in six cities across the United States who work from their homes.

At the Global Center for Health Innovation, a public building owned by Cuyahoga County, Ohio State recruiters will have access to a variety of common spaces for meetings and events. Convenient parking is also available in an attached underground garage. These amenities combined with a facility designed to Ohio State’s specifications will also provide a valuable physical space for colleges and units such as the Alumni Association and Advancement to meet with key stakeholders.

The university has signed a five-year lease on the new space with an option to terminate the lease after two years. The rent is $29,600 per year.

Delaware County Ranks in Study on Places Receiving Most Investment

Local investment and economic expansion are positive signs for communities because of the quality of life improvements they signify. In light of this, financial technology company SmartAsset released a study on the counties receiving the greatest amount of investment in their local economies.

Delaware County ranked among the top places in Ohio due to a strong showing in each of the factors considered by the company including: business growth, GDP growth, new building permits and federal funding.

Take a look at the table below to see where Delaware County compared to other top counties in Ohio:

Rank County Business Growth GDP Growth ($ in millions) New Building Permits (per 1,000 homes) Federal Funding (per capita) Incoming Investment Index

1 Delaware, OH 4.0% $503 21.3 $893 50.66

2 Union, OH 1.5% $119 18.8 $6 45.13

3 Warren, OH 5.3% $487 15.0 $214 44.03

4 Franklin, OH 3.3% $3,279 10.5 $835 39.46

5 Greene, OH 2.0% $363 10.3 $5,510 36.00

6 Medina, OH 1.5% $472 9.8 $207 34.57

7 Fairfield, OH 3.4% $312 7.5 $8 33.22

8 Butler, OH 2.4% $841 7.6 $1,358 33.02

9 Lorain, OH 0.3% $660 7.6 $163 31.10

10 Clermont, OH 1.1% $424 5.9 $773 29.58

Additional study details including the methodology and interactive map can be found here: https://smartasset.com/investing/investment-calculator#Ohio

Patrol warns against drinking and driving this Fourth of July

Ohio State Highway Patrol

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over

COLUMBUS – The Ohio State Highway Patrol will be highly visible and cracking down on impaired drivers during the Fourth of July holiday reporting period, which begins Tuesday, July 3 and ends Wednesday, July 4. The Patrol’s zero-tolerance policy is part of the national Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement campaign aimed at removing impaired drivers from the roadways.

Many Fourth of July celebrations involve alcohol, which increases the possibility of impaired driving. Therefore, the Patrol urges motorists to drive carefully and follow all traffic laws.

During last year’s Fourth of July reporting period from June 30 through July 4, a total of 21 fatal crashes killed 21 people. This includes eight OVI-related fatal crashes that killed eight people. The Patrol recorded 922 OVI arrests during the reporting period.

“This Fourth of July, don’t risk losing your life or taking someone else’s,” said Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent. “Make this a safe holiday for everyone by planning a sober ride home.”

Motorists are encouraged to call #677 to report impaired drivers or drug activity.

Patrol to Focus on Safe Driving Around Commercial Vehicle

COLUMBUS – Ohio State Highway Patrol and members of the Great Lakes Initiative will focus on commercial vehicle safety. The enforcement program will target failure to yield, unsafe lane changes and following too close violations by other vehicles around large trucks.

In 2017, 45 percent of commercial vehicle related crashes (25,565), were not the fault of the commercial vehicle. Motorists are reminded to use caution when driving around commercial vehicles. Large trucks and buses have operating limitations such as blind spots, longer stopping distances, and limited maneuverability that make it essential for other vehicles to focus on safety.

The initiative will begin on July 2 and run through July 6 in partnership with the International Association of Chiefs of Police. The high visibility enforcement will consist of law enforcement officers in Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and Ohio.

“Crashes can be avoided by sharing the road with commercial vehicles,” said Colonel Paul Pride, superintendent. “Remember, if you cannot see the commercial vehicle driver in the side view mirror, assume the driver cannot see you.”

Areas with limited visibility are located directly behind, in front and on either side of the commercial vehicle. Those areas are more prone to crashes because the commercial driver cannot see the motorist. For more tips on driving around commercial vehicles safely, please visit https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/ourroads/tips-driving-safely-around-large-trucks-or-buses.

The Great lakes Initiative is a multi-state partnership aimed at reducing commercial involved crashes through enforcement and education.

Ohio’s Move Over law is designed to protect the lives of everyone who works on or uses our roadways. The law requires vehicles to move over to an adjacent lane when approaching any vehicle with flashing or rotating lights parked on the roadside.

Highway Patrol graduates 25 cadets in ceremony

Columbus – The Patrol’s 163rd Academy Class graduated after 24 weeks of intense training. The keynote address was provided by Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted. Additional remarks were provided by Director John Born, Ohio Department of Public Safety; Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol Superintendent and Captain Chuck A. Jones, Academy Commandant. The Oath of Office was issued by Judge Everett H. Krueger, Delaware County Court of Common Pleas.

Courses completed by the 163rd class included, crash investigation, criminal and traffic law, detection of impaired drivers, firearms, physical fitness, self-defense and emergency vehicle operations.

Trooper Brandon R. Blackwelder, Pensacola, Fla., was selected as class speaker and thanked the Academy and cadet family members for being supportive during their training.

Three graduates received special honors for top performance in various fields of study at the Training Academy. The honorees were:

• Overall performance – Trooper Michael P. Herdman, Lancaster

• Top performance in academics – Trooper Cidney R. Molina Mendez, Elyria

• Top performance in driving – Trooper Michael P. Herdman, Lancaster

• Top performance in firearms – Trooper Michael P. Herdman, Lancaster

• Top performance in physical fitness – Trooper Ravonne R. Lawrence, Diamond

Each of the graduates will report to their posts on Sunday, June 25, 2018. The graduates’ first 60-working days will be a field-training period under the guidance of a veteran officer. The new graduates are assigned to 17 of the Patrol’s 58 posts.

FIRST MI LAST HOMETOWN Assignment

Jose A Alcantara Rodriguez Cleveland, OH Warren District, Hiram Post

Fernando Arriago Galloway, OH Findlay District, Findlay Post

Brandon R Blackwelder Pensacola, FL Bucyrus District, Marion Post

Josef M Brobst Plain City, OH Findlay District, Findlay Post

Holly M Chesnick Lorain, OH Cambridge District, Steubenville Post

Margaret M Clay Fort Wayne, IN Bucyrus District, Fremont Post

Samantha T Cuellar Walbridge, OH Findlay District, Swanton Post

Jarid I Fitzpatrick Grove City, OH Wilmington District, Wilmington Post

Efrain Gonzalez III Lorain, OH Warren District, Canfield Post

Marisa A Guyton Powell, OH Cambridge District, Steubenville Post

Michael P Herdman Lancaster, OH Jackson District, Jackson Post

William P Holmes II Chillicothe, OH Jackson District, Ironton Post

Ravonne R Lawrence Diamond, OH Columbus District, Delaware Post

Son T Le Tampa, FL Findlay District, Van Wert Post

Matthew E Magistri Athens, OH Cleveland District, Canton Post

Eduard Manu Tallmadge, OH Warren District, Hiram Post

Balla Mbengue Blacklick, OH Warren District, Hiram Post

Shannon E Mohney Medina, OH Cleveland District, Canton Post

Cidney R Molina Mendez Elyria, OH Bucyrus District, Norwalk Post

Anthony S Pingitore Mansfield, OH Columbus District, Mt. Gilead Post

Arslan Qaisar Struthers, OH Warren District, Canfield Post

Damian M Roose Maumee, OH Findlay District, Findlay Post

James L Tarver III Springboro, OH Findlay District, Findlay Post

Carissa M Webb Waipahu, HI Bucyrus District, Bucyrus Post

Bradley A White Wheelersburg, OH Jackson District, Ironton Post

22 Officers Graduate from Patrol’s Basic Peace Officer Class

COLUMBUS – Members of the 139th Basic Peace Officer Class received training certificates during a graduation ceremony at the Ohio State Highway Patrol Training Academy. The 22 graduates will assume duties as peace officers for 16 Ohio agencies.

The 22-week basic course began in January. The course was developed by the Ohio Peace Officer Training Commission and offers comprehensive instruction in more than 150 topics, including criminal law, traffic law, community relations, physical training, self-defense, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, standardized field sobriety testing and electronic speed measuring devices.

Officer Vincent D. Piccoli, Medina Police Department, was selected as class speaker by his fellow class members and addressed the assembly.

Class honors went to the following:

Overall Top Performer – Kyle R. Wilson, North Olmstead Police Department

Top Academics – Kyle R. Wilson, North Olmstead Police Department

Top Firearms – Mark T. Dickinson, Brecksville Police Department

Top Physical Fitness – Kyle R. Wilson, North Olmstead Police Department

Top Driving – Justin P. Byrd, Mason Police Department

Chief of Police Heinz von Eckartsberg, Dublin Police Department, was the featured speaker for the ceremony and addressed an audience of graduates, friends, relatives and law enforcement officers. Director John Born, Department of Public Safety and Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, provided remarks. Colonel Pride presented the certificates of training to the graduates.

First Name, MI Last Name Agency

Justin P. Byrd Mason Police Department

Faith J.D. Combs Marion Division of Police

Mellison M. Davis Bexley Police Department

Christian D. Dekker West Chester Police Department

Mark T. Dickinson Brecksville Police Department

Hannah M. Evans Reynoldsburg Police Department

Caleb J. Harper Greenville Police Department

Adrienne L. Horlacher Elyria Police Department

Meredith M. Hotchkiss Springdale Police Department

Steven T. Kocol Centerville Police Department

Geovanny Mercado Springfield Police Department

Major R. Miller West Chester Police Department

Zachary J. Parker Centerville Police Department

Vincent D. Piccoli Medina Police Department

Mitchell H. Schambs Reynoldsburg Police Department

Evan R. Scherer Medina Police Department

Nathan C. Viets Bedford Police Department

Christopher G. Wade Medina Police Department

John M. Werner Mason Police Department

Brentten M. Wiley Blue Ash Police Department

Kyle R. Wilson North Olmstead Police Department

Gregor S. Zingarelli Lancaster Police Department

Patrol’s Sergeant Anderson promoted to Lieutenant in the Columbus District Commercial Enforcement Unit

COLUMBUS – Sergeant Ronald E. Anderson was promoted to the rank of lieutenant by Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, during a ceremony at the Patrol’s Training Academy. Lieutenant Anderson will transfer from his current assignment at the Sandusky Post to serve in the Columbus District Commercial Enforcement Unit.

Lieutenant Anderson began his Patrol career in October 2001 as a member of the 138th Academy Class. He earned his commission in April of the following year and was assigned to the Bowling Green Post. As a trooper, he also served in the Bucyrus District Commercial Enforcement Unit. In 2011, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and transferred to the Sandusky Post to serve as an assistant post commander.

Lieutenant Anderson served in the United States Air Force from 1990 to 1994.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is an internationally accredited agency whose mission is to protect life and property, promote traffic safety and provide professional public safety services with respect, compassion, and unbiased professionalism.

Patrol’s Lieutenant Brown promoted to Staff Lieutenant at the Columbus District Headquarters

COLUMBUS – Lieutenant David R. Brown was promoted to the rank of staff lieutenant on June 10, 2018 and was recognized today by Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, during a ceremony at the Patrol’s Training Academy. Staff Lieutenant Brown will transfer from his current assignment at the West Jefferson Post to serve as an assistant district commander at the Columbus District Headquarters.

Staff Lieutenant Brown began his Patrol career in June 2005 as a member of the 145th Academy Class. He earned his commission in January of the following year and was assigned to the Dayton Post. In 2007, he earned the Ace Award for excellence in auto larceny enforcement. As a trooper, he also served on the Motorcycle Unit. In 2012, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and transferred to the Circleville Post to serve as an assistant post commander. As a sergeant, he also served at the Patrol’s Training Academy. In 2015, he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant and transferred to the Lima Post to serve as commander. As a lieutenant, he also served at the West Jefferson Post.

Staff Lieutenant Brown earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology from The Ohio State University in 2005.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is an internationally accredited agency whose mission is to protect life and property, promote traffic safety and provide professional public safety services with respect, compassion, and unbiased professionalism.

Patrol’s Lieutenant Thomas promoted to Staff Lieutenant in the Office of Personnel

June 28, 2018

COLUMBUS – Lieutenant Darren K. Thomas was promoted to the rank of staff lieutenant today by Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, during a ceremony at the Patrol’s Training Academy. Staff Lieutenant Thomas will transfer from his current assignment at the Ravenna Post to serve in the Office of Personnel, Training Academy.

Staff Lieutenant Thomas began his Patrol career in February 1994 as a member of the 126th Academy Class. He earned his commission in July of that year and was assigned to the Milan Post. As a trooper, he also served at the Elyria Post and the Patrol’s Training Academy. In 2004, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and remained at the Patrol’s Training Academy. As a sergeant, he also served at the Sandusky, Milan and Norwalk posts. In 2013, he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant and transferred to the Patrol’s Training Academy. As a lieutenant, he also served at the Ravenna Post.

Staff Lieutenant Thomas earned an Associate of Arts degree in liberal arts from Lorain county Community college in 1994. He completed advanced leadership training at Northwestern University’s School of Police Staff and Command in 2010.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is an internationally accredited agency whose mission is to protect life and property, promote traffic safety and provide professional public safety services with respect, compassion, and unbiased professionalism.

Patrol’s Lieutenant Hendrix promoted to Staff Lieutenant in the Office of Planning and Finance

June 28, 2018

Columbus – Lieutenant Nakia J. Hendrix was promoted to the rank of staff lieutenant today by Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, during a ceremony at the Patrol’s Training Academy. Staff Lieutenant Hendrix will remain in the Office of Planning and Finance.

Staff Lieutenant Hendrix began his Patrol career in February 1999 as a member of the 133rd Academy Class. He earned his commission in July of that year and was assigned to the Wooster Post. As a trooper, he also served at the Canton, Hiram and Warren posts, and at the Patrol’s Training Academy. In 2005, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and transferred to the Ashtabula Post to serve as an assistant post commander. As a sergeant, he also served at the Canfield and Hiram and Warren posts. In 2012, he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant and transferred to the Ravenna Post to serve as post commander. As a lieutenant, he also served at the Canfield Post and in the Office of Planning and Finance.

Staff Lieutenant Hendrix earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in police science from Youngstown State University in 1996.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is an internationally accredited agency whose mission is to protect life and property, promote traffic safety and provide professional public safety services with respect, compassion, and unbiased professionalism.

Patrol’s Sergeant Curry promoted to Lieutenant at the West Jefferson Post

COLUMBUS – Sergeant Robert A. Curry was promoted to the rank of lieutenant on June 10, 2018 and was recognized today by Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, during a ceremony at the Patrol’s Training Academy. Lieutenant Curry will transfer from his current assignment at the Mt. Gilead Post to serve as post commander of the West Jefferson Post.

Lieutenant Curry began his Patrol career in October 2001 as a member of the 138th Academy Class. He earned his commission in April of the following year and was assigned to the Mt. Gilead Post. In 2011, he earned the Criminal Patrol Award. As a trooper, he also served at the Delaware Post. In 2013, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and remained at the Delaware Post to serve as an assistant post commander. As a sergeant, he also served at the Mt. Gilead Post.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is an internationally accredited agency whose mission is to protect life and property, promote traffic safety and provide professional public safety services with respect, compassion, and unbiased professionalism.

Patrol’s Trooper Fuller promoted to Sergeant at the Granville Post

June 28, 2018

COLUMBUS – Trooper Kaitlin D. Fuller was promoted to the rank of sergeant today by Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, during a ceremony at the Patrol’s Training Academy. Sergeant Fuller will transfer from her current assignment at the Columbus District Investigations Unit to serve as an assistant post commander at the Granville Post.

Sergeant Fuller began her Patrol career in May 2009 as a member of the 149th Academy Class. She earned her commission in December of that year and was assigned to the Marysville Post. As a trooper, she also served at the Lancaster Post and the Columbus District Investigations Unit.

Sergeant Fuller earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in law enforcement in 2006 and a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminal justice in 2008 from Ohio University.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is an internationally accredited agency whose mission is to protect life and property, promote traffic safety and provide professional public safety services with respect, compassion, and unbiased professionalism.

In this frame from video, porn actress Stormy Daniels is led into jail in Columbus, Ohio., after being taken into custody during a Wednesday evening, July 11, 2018, show. Daniels was arrested at a strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday, July 12. (WBNS via AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120936733-dca323a4fea44b9b90451aa0649ba619.jpgIn this frame from video, porn actress Stormy Daniels is led into jail in Columbus, Ohio., after being taken into custody during a Wednesday evening, July 11, 2018, show. Daniels was arrested at a strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday, July 12. (WBNS via AP)

This photo provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday, July 12, 2018, shows porn actress Stormy Daniels. Daniels was arrested at a Columbus, Ohio strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday. (Franklin County Sheriff’s Office via AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120936733-f9fce99cfc1e442b8e9f72a5b3288f37.jpgThis photo provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday, July 12, 2018, shows porn actress Stormy Daniels. Daniels was arrested at a Columbus, Ohio strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday. (Franklin County Sheriff’s Office via AP)

FILE – In this May 23, 2018 file photo, porn actress Stormy Daniels speaks during a ceremony for her receiving a City Proclamation and Key to the City in West Hollywood, Calif. Daniels was arrested at an Ohio strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday, July 12. While Daniels was performing at Sirens, a strip club in Columbus, some patrons touched her in a “non-sexual” way, her lawyer, Michael Avenatti, told The Associated Press. An Ohio law known as the Community Defense Act prohibits anyone who isn’t a family member to touch a nude or semi-nude dancer. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120936733-6ec019155cb94f878e0c8032ca2297df.jpgFILE – In this May 23, 2018 file photo, porn actress Stormy Daniels speaks during a ceremony for her receiving a City Proclamation and Key to the City in West Hollywood, Calif. Daniels was arrested at an Ohio strip club and is accused of letting patrons touch her in violation of a state law, her attorney said early Thursday, July 12. While Daniels was performing at Sirens, a strip club in Columbus, some patrons touched her in a “non-sexual” way, her lawyer, Michael Avenatti, told The Associated Press. An Ohio law known as the Community Defense Act prohibits anyone who isn’t a family member to touch a nude or semi-nude dancer. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)

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