‘Garp’ writer wins literary prize


Staff & Wire Reports



FILE - In this June 7, 2016 file photo, John Irving speaks at a book discussion for his novel "Avenue of Mysteries" at Coral Gables Congregational Church in Miami. Irving is this year’s winner of a lifetime achievement award celebrating literature’s power to foster peace. Dayton Literary Peace Prize officials have chosen John Irving, whose first novel was published 50 years ago when he was 26, for the Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award. It's named for the late U.S. diplomat who brokered the 1995 Bosnia peace accords reached in Ohio. (Photo by Michele Eve Sandberg/Invision/AP, File)

FILE - In this June 7, 2016 file photo, John Irving speaks at a book discussion for his novel "Avenue of Mysteries" at Coral Gables Congregational Church in Miami. Irving is this year’s winner of a lifetime achievement award celebrating literature’s power to foster peace. Dayton Literary Peace Prize officials have chosen John Irving, whose first novel was published 50 years ago when he was 26, for the Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award. It's named for the late U.S. diplomat who brokered the 1995 Bosnia peace accords reached in Ohio. (Photo by Michele Eve Sandberg/Invision/AP, File)


Author John Irving wins literary peace award

By DAN SEWELL

Associated Press

Wednesday, July 18

CINCINNATI (AP) — The author of novels such as “The World According to Garp” and “The Cider House Rules” that examine the complexities of sexual differences and other social issues is this year’s winner of a lifetime achievement award celebrating literature’s power to foster peace, social justice and global understanding, organizers said Tuesday.

Dayton Literary Peace Prize officials chose John Irving, whose first novel, “Setting Free the Bears,” was published 50 years ago when he was 26, for the Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award. It’s named for the late U.S. diplomat who brokered the 1995 Bosnia peace accords reached in Ohio.

Sharon Rab, founder and chairwoman of the peace prize foundation, said Irving’s books often show “the tragedy of a lack of empathy and sympathy for our fellow humans … through books — especially Irving’s books — readers learn to understand and identify with people different from themselves.”

Irving’s all-time best-selling novel, “A Prayer for Owen Meany,” examines faith, fate and social justice through the intertwined lives of two boyhood friends. Often using humor to illuminate deep topics, Irving’s works have included bisexual, homosexual and transgender people.

The National Book Award-winning “The World According to Garp” was made into a movie starring the late Robin Williams, and Irving won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for the movie version of “The Cider House Rules,” which deals with issues including abortion.

Irving said in a statement that if a prize helps bring attention to his subject matter, he welcomes it.

“I’ve written about sexual difference and sexual minorities — at times, when the prevailing literary culture labeled it bizarre or unreachable,” said the Exeter, New Hampshire-born author who now lives in Toronto. “I’ve written with the hope that the bigotry, hatred and flat-out violence perpetrated on sexual minorities would become a relic of the past. In that sense I’ve written in protest — I’ve written protest novels.”

At 76, Irving is working on his 15th novel, a ghost story titled “Darkness as a Bride.” His other writings have included the short story “Interior Space,” recognized with an O. Henry Award in 1981.

The award carries a $10,000 prize. Previous winners include Studs Terkel, Taylor Branch, Gloria Steinem, and Elie Wiesel.

Irving and winners of fiction and nonfiction competitions will be honored Oct. 28 in Dayton.

Follow Dan Sewell at http://www.twitter.com/dansewell

To see his other work: https://apnews.com/search/dan%20sewell

Don’t Miss Zoombezi Bay Summer Nights

July 18, 2018

Powell, OH – Don’t miss your chance to light up the night during Zoombezi Bay Summer Nights, presented by Swedish Fish. There are just three more Summer Nights events for the season, each with special late night activities on Friday nights until 11 p.m.

Beginning at 6 p.m., guests can watch their favorite Central Ohio waterpark transform as the sun goes down and their favorite attractions become even more thrilling in the dark. Some favorite rides and attractions, including the all new Otter Banks area, Cyclone, SoundSurfer, Big Boa Falls and more, will be open until 11 p.m. for thrill-seekers to enjoy some extra splash time in the park.

In addition to having access to Zoombezi Bay’s many attractions after dark, Otter Banks will host live entertainment, including music, animals from the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium and friendly character ambassadors to entertain guests of all ages. Swedish Fish samples and activities will also be available.

Additionally, each Summer Nights event features a different family-friendly movie at 9 p.m. on a jumbo screen that guests can enjoy while floating on an inner tube (while supplies last) in the Wild Tides Wave Pool or from a chaise lounge chair along the shore. The remaining summer lineup includes:

JULY 20 Sing

In order to save a once-grand theater fallen on hard times, dapper koala Buster Moon strives to preserve the theater by producing the world’s greatest singing competition. Animal singers come from all corners to step into the spotlight and dream big in the name of saving the theater from ruin.

Rated PG; 108 minutes; 2016

JULY 27 Elf

Follow the adventures of Buddy the Elf as he travels all the way from the North Pole to be reunited with his father. Along the way, Buddy spreads Christmas cheer to every cynic he meets with his childlike antics.

Rated PG; 97 minutes; 2003

AUG. 3 The LEGO Batman Movie

This thrilling animated movie follows Batman as he tries to save Gotham from the clutches of the Joker. In order to save the city, Batman must learn the importance of teamwork alongside his superhero sidekick Robin and loyal butler Alfred.

Rated PG; 104 minutes; 2017

Regular admission rates apply for each Summer Nights event, but guests who visit Zoombezi Bay after 5 p.m. on the night of the event and use the code phrase, “Swedish Fish Tropical,” at the ticket booth will receive discounted admission for $15 per person. After 8 p.m., guests using the code phrase will receive $10 admission per person. Those who follow Zoombezi Bay on Facebook will have the chance to enter to win a Family 4-Pack each week leading up to each Friday’s Summer Nights event.

For more information or to purchase Zoombezi Bay admission tickets and season passes, visit www.zoombezibay.com.

About Zoombezi Bay

Zoombezi Bay is a 22.7-acre water park that features 19 state-of-the-art water attractions, including the aquatic adventure area, Otter Banks; themed water slide, SoundSurfer; the multi-level play structure, Baboon Lagoon; a wave pool; an action river; a lazy river; a kiddie play pool and more. Admission to Zoombezi Bay includes the Columbus Zoo, and proceeds from the water park support the Zoo’s operation and mission. Please visit www.zoombezibay.com for more information.

FILE – In this June 7, 2016 file photo, John Irving speaks at a book discussion for his novel "Avenue of Mysteries" at Coral Gables Congregational Church in Miami. Irving is this year’s winner of a lifetime achievement award celebrating literature’s power to foster peace. Dayton Literary Peace Prize officials have chosen John Irving, whose first novel was published 50 years ago when he was 26, for the Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award. It’s named for the late U.S. diplomat who brokered the 1995 Bosnia peace accords reached in Ohio. (Photo by Michele Eve Sandberg/Invision/AP, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120965720-57db7e596dd940c59693dba5e6bb8cc8.jpgFILE – In this June 7, 2016 file photo, John Irving speaks at a book discussion for his novel "Avenue of Mysteries" at Coral Gables Congregational Church in Miami. Irving is this year’s winner of a lifetime achievement award celebrating literature’s power to foster peace. Dayton Literary Peace Prize officials have chosen John Irving, whose first novel was published 50 years ago when he was 26, for the Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award. It’s named for the late U.S. diplomat who brokered the 1995 Bosnia peace accords reached in Ohio. (Photo by Michele Eve Sandberg/Invision/AP, File)

Staff & Wire Reports