Ohio News Briefs: Dayton


Staff & Wire Reports



Shane Juhl, owner and proprietor of Toxic Brew Co., poses for a photograph at his taproom located in the Oregon District, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton, Ohio. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Shane Juhl, owner and proprietor of Toxic Brew Co., poses for a photograph at his taproom located in the Oregon District, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton, Ohio. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)


A tribute statue commemorating the Wright Brothers stands on Monument Avenue, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton, Ohio. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)


Dayton, Ohio, resident Ash Lyn browses records outside Feathers antiques and vintage clothing boutique in the Oregon District, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)


Baseball, beer help Wright Brothers’ hometown rise again

By MITCH STACY

Associated Press

Wednesday, July 18

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — When I was growing up in greater Dayton, Ohio, in the 1960s and ’70s, the city already had been to the top of prosperity hill and was coasting down the other side.

Early 20th century Dayton was a metropolis that hummed with innovation and commerce. Population topped out in 1960 at just over 260,000. After that, the city gradually lost families to the suburbs and others left as manufacturing declined and jobs evaporated. Downtown retail moved out as the population shifted.

By the time I left in the early 1980s, Dayton — and downtown especially — was frayed around the edges.

Moving back to Ohio after three decades away, I returned to Dayton and found some good stuff. There was a minor-league ballpark downtown, a lovely riverfront park, people out enjoying themselves and a burgeoning craft-beer culture. Craft beer!

The place had become kind of cool.

Understand, the economy here will never again be what it was when multiple General Motors plants provided thousands of jobs, and National Cash Register stood as proud symbol of grand homegrown commerce (the company took its headquarters and 1,250 jobs to Atlanta in 2009). Some parts of the city still reflect the malaise.

But efforts to diversify Dayton, trumpet its rich history and make it a cleaner, brighter, more interesting place are working.

The city spruced up the Great Miami riverfront, creating a family friendly downtown park. An old railroad freight house was converted into a popular public market. The city scored a minor-league baseball team — the Class-A Dayton Dragons — and put up a fan-friendly, 7,200-seat stadium. Fifth Third Field has sold out every single game since it opened in 2000 — the longest streak in any professional sport. The ballpark draws crowds even though the Cincinnati Reds, a Major League Baseball team, play just 55 miles (88 kilometers) away.

“Certainly this side of downtown wasn’t doing really well, and that started to change around the time of the ballpark opening,” said Alan F. Pippenger, whose venerable family business, the Requarth Lumber Co., is situated just beyond the left-field foul pole of Fifth Third Field. The Requarth building has been there so long that the Wright Brothers visited to buy lumber for their early flying machines.

When Pippenger came back to Dayton to take over the company in 1985, one of the only places to get lunch was the basement snack bar of the Sear’s store down the street. There are way more choices now. And more people around.

New restaurants and bars have opened up around the ballpark. Closed factories and warehouses have been converted to sleek apartments that are snapped up as fast they’re built. Construction equipment downtown has become a familiar sight.

Dayton also boasts a resident philharmonic orchestra, 2,300-seat downtown performing arts center and a nationally recognized art museum. Not bad for metro area with just around 800,000 people, including 140,000 in the city itself.

Here are five more reasons why Dayton is a happening place:

THE WRIGHT STUFF

The city’s favorite sons are Wilbur and Orville Wright, who built the first airplane in their bicycle shop and, after making the initial powered flight in December 1903 at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, came home to Dayton to work the bugs out. A memorial stands at Huffman Prairie, where they made flights in 1904-05 and really learned to control the plane. Don’t get us started on claims that anywhere else is the “birthplace of flight.”

MORE AIRPLANES

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is one of the greatest museums in the country and a stop on the “Dayton Aviation Trail,” which includes many of the Wright sites. The museum attracts about a million visitors a year and has on display such national treasures as a Wright 1909 Flyer, the Air Force One that brought President John F. Kennedy’s body back from Dallas, and the newly restored World War II bomber “Memphis Belle.”

THE OREGON DISTRICT

The center of residential life in Dayton’s formative years, the historic Oregon District has some lovingly preserved buildings and homes. Fifth Street now is a hipster haven, lined with bars and restaurants and a great place to see live music.

GOOD BEER

Craft beer has become the next big thing, with at least a half-dozen bars/restaurants and four breweries opening within a mile of each other near Fifth Third Field, part of the Dayton Ale Trail. Besides sublime local brews, many of the places have excellent eats.

FIRST FOUR

March Madness begins every year with great fanfare in Dayton. First Four play-in games of the NCAA Tournament have brought the national spotlight to the city for the past 18 years. The event is well-supported locally as eight potential Cinderellas play at University of Dayton Arena for the chance to break into the big dance. The second night of this year’s First Four set a new attendance record for the event.

Follow Mitch Stacy at http://twitter.com/mitchstacy

Teams looking for hitters have options besides Manny Machado

By ROB MAADDI

AP Sports Writer

Wednesday, July 18

Manny Machado will be wearing a new uniform when he plays his next game, and other hitters will be on the move in the next couple weeks.

Even after Machado was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers, teams seeking to boost their offense will have several options to land a big bat. The four-time All-Star with the Baltimore Orioles was the most coveted player available on the trade market.

There’s only one Machado, but several guys can bolster a team’s starting lineup and make an impact down the stretch.

Here are eight hitters who may have new teams before the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline:

MIKE MOUSTAKAS: After smacking a career-best 38 homers for the Kansas City Royals last year, the two-time All-Star third baseman didn’t get a lucrative deal in free agency and returned on a one-year deal for $6.5 million plus a mutual option for 2019. He has 19 homers and 58 RBIs but is only batting .249 for the worst team in the majors.

SCOOTER GENNETT: The Cincinnati Reds aren’t going anywhere and they’d be selling high on their All-Star second baseman. Gennett, a waiver claim last year, had a breakout season in 2017 when he swatted 27 homers and drove in 97 runs. He’s batting .326 with 16 homers and 63 RBIs this season. Gennett is a fan favorite in his hometown and can’t become a free agent until 2020, so prying him away from the Reds might be difficult.

ASDRUBAL CABRERA: The 32-year-old infielder is batting .281 with 17 homers and 52 RBIs for the hapless New York Mets. He’s only played second base this season but started at shortstop and third base last year. Cabrera is a switch hitter who would give a team versatility and pop. He’s also slated to become a free agent after the season, so the Mets can’t expect to get too much in return for the two-time All-Star.

SHIN-SOO CHOO: A first-time All-Star, Choo has 18 homers and is on pace to hit a career-best 30 for the last-place Texas Rangers. Choo is batting .291 with a .405 on-base percentage, but the left-handed-hitting right fielder just turned 36 and is owed $42 million over the next two seasons.

EDUARDO ESCOBAR: The versatile infielder has a .271 average, 14 homers and 57 RBIs with 35 doubles for the Minnesota Twins. Escobar can play shortstop, second base or third base, plus he’s started in left field during his career. He’s making $4.85 million this season and will be a free agent in the fall.

WILSON RAMOS: An All-Star catcher for the second time in three years, Ramos is batting .297 with 14 homers and 53 RBIs for the Tampa Bay Rays. But he injured his hamstring and is heading to the disabled list, decreasing his trade value.

NICK CASTELLANOS: He’s having another strong season for the Detroit Tigers after hitting 26 homers and knocking in 101 runs last year. The 26-year-old right fielder is batting .305 with 15 homers and 56 RBIs and is under team control for another season.

JOSH DONALDSON: The 2015 AL MVP is struggling through an injury-riddled season and has only played 36 games, but he averaged 35 homers and 100 RBIs between 2014-17 and is entering free agency after the season. The Toronto Blue Jays should be eager to move Donaldson if another team is willing to gamble that he’ll be healthy enough to make a difference.

More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball

TAPS to Welcome Families of America’s Fallen Heroes to Ohio Regional Survivor Seminar & Good Grief Camp

Battelle Sponsors TAPS Regional Military Survivor Seminar and Good Grief Camp in Ohio

Peer-Based Support Helps Adults and Children Find Hope and Healing

ARLINGTON, Va. – July 24, 2018 — Over 200 family members of America’s fallen military heroes will gather at the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) Ohio Regional Survivor Seminar and Good Grief Camp from July 27-29 at the University of Dayton. Those attending will share their stories to honor their loved ones while learning how to cope with grief and find healing in their shared experiences. This TAPS event has been made possible by the generous support of Battelle.

TAPS provides a full weekend of programming designed to address the needs of all military loss survivors through proven best practices and a dynamic, peer-based model of care. Workshops are created and facilitated by experts in the fields of grief and loss, bereavement, trauma, suicide prevention, as well as suicide postvention survivor care.

For children, the TAPS Good Grief Camp will be led by experts in child development, mental health and education to provide a safe space for military children to explore grief and embrace healing. Coping skills are learned through games, crafts and other age-appropriate activities. Children and teens will gain a network of new friends their own age who are also grieving a fallen hero and learn that they are not alone in their grief. They will have opportunities to connect one-on-one with military mentors and come to understand that they are part of an American legacy of service and sacrifice.

Volunteers, including military service members from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and recent veterans, have completed a TAPS mentor training program to prepare them to work with families and surviving children attending the Good Grief Camp.

“TAPS regional seminars bring together military families grieving a fallen hero and provide support, resources, and compassionate care,” said Bonnie Carroll, TAPS president and founder and a 2015 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient. “Through these TAPS weekends of sharing held across the country, grieving military families find comfort and healing as they honor those who have served and died. We are humbly grateful to Battelle for their support of our military families and for helping us to bring this event to Ohio.”

Battelle has a long history of working with the military dating back to armor plating in World War II, to building specialty armored vehicles used today. It continues to provide solutions across multiple Department of Defense agencies and supports numerous veterans and military groups as part of its charitable giving.

“Using science and technology to keep our military troops safe and help them achieve their missions is a key part of Battelle’s day-to-day work,” said President and CEO Lou Von Thaer. “I personally support the TAPS mission because I believe supporting loved ones at home is as important as supporting our troops when they are in theater.”

ABOUT TAPS

The Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) is the national organization providing compassionate care for the families of America’s fallen military heroes and has offered support to more than 80,000 surviving family members of our fallen military and their caregivers since 1994. TAPS provides peer-based emotional support, grief and trauma resources, grief seminars and retreats for adults, Good Grief Camps for children, case work assistance, connections to community-based care, online and in-person support groups and a 24/7 resource and information helpline for all who have been affected by a death in the Armed Forces. Services are provided free of charge. For more information go to www.taps.org or call the toll-free TAPS resource and information helpline at 1.800.959.TAPS (8277).

ABOUT BATTELLE

Every day, the people of Battelle apply science and technology to solving what matters most. At major technology centers and national laboratories around the world, Battelle conducts research and development, designs and manufactures products, and delivers critical services for government and commercial customers. Headquartered in Columbus, Ohio since its founding in 1929, Battelle makes the world better by commercializing technology, giving back to our communities, and supporting science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. For more information, visit www.battelle.org.

Shane Juhl, owner and proprietor of Toxic Brew Co., poses for a photograph at his taproom located in the Oregon District, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton, Ohio. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120975320-aeb92263827246158e288c380a84997a.jpgShane Juhl, owner and proprietor of Toxic Brew Co., poses for a photograph at his taproom located in the Oregon District, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton, Ohio. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

A tribute statue commemorating the Wright Brothers stands on Monument Avenue, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton, Ohio. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120975320-0b31100ab1094120a9fdf4bbec15772c.jpgA tribute statue commemorating the Wright Brothers stands on Monument Avenue, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton, Ohio. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Dayton, Ohio, resident Ash Lyn browses records outside Feathers antiques and vintage clothing boutique in the Oregon District, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120975320-b532555a7569454d8224eb66b3604e2d.jpgDayton, Ohio, resident Ash Lyn browses records outside Feathers antiques and vintage clothing boutique in the Oregon District, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Dayton. After experiencing its best days in the first half of the 20th century, Dayton is reinventing itself with impressive results. Minor-league baseball, a riverside park and a cluster of craft beer pubs are helping revitalize a downtown that had become frayed around the edges. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Staff & Wire Reports