Columbus Native in the Navy


Submitted



Kraft

Kraft


Aug 7

An Ocean Away, Columbus Native Serves in U.S. Navy, Lives in Europe, Supports NATO Mission

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brian T. Glunt, Navy Office of Community Outreach

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Amanda Rae Moreno

ROTA, Spain – A 2017 general equivalency development graduate and Columbus, Ohio, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Fireman Nichlos Kraft is a gas turbine system technician (electrical) aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy gas turbine system technician (electrical) is responsible for the maintenance of the gas turbine generators and it’s corresponding switch boards.

Kraft credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Columbus.

“Back home, my youth pastor, Matt Stacey, really pushed me out of my comfort zone to go and try new things,” said Kraft. “He inspired me to join the Navy.”

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Kraft, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Kraft is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“I have an uncle who was in the Navy,” said Kraft. “He told me some of his sea stories, which heavily influenced my decision to enlist.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Kraft has found many great rewards.

Kraft is proud of earning an advancement to the rank of fireman apprentice before leaving basic training.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Kraft and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy has aided me by teaching me to be early and how to be more professional,” said Kraft. “My favorite parts about serving in Spain have been experiencing the culture and meeting new people.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2012 Houston Academy for Internation Studies graduate and Houston native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Cordell Baham is a yeoman aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy yeoman is responsible for clerical duties, to write and revise several directives and instructions.

Baham credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Houston.

“I was taught to always keep your head up,” said Baham. “Hard work pays off.”

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

“My father knew after college I needed somewhere to assert my skills so he suggested the Navy,” said Baham.

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Baham has found many great rewards.

Baham is proud of advancing to the rank of petty officer third class.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Baham and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“My work ethic has improved indefinitely since joining the Navy,” said Baham. “Also, living in Spain allows me to experience different cultures from all over Europe.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2013 Pensaola Collegiate High School graduate and Jacksonville, Florida, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Kayla Bowens is a cryptological technical technician aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy cryptological technical technician is responsible for the ship’s defense by working with intelligence to help leaders make tactical decisions.

Bowens credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Jacksonville.

“You have to be down-to-earth and have thick skin,” said Bowens. “People can be straighforward and you can’t let that bother you.”

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Bowens, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Bowens is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“My dad was in the Army and my mom was a nurse in the Air Force,” said Bowens. “They encouraged me if I wanted to try new things and see the world, to join the military.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Bowens has found many great rewards.

Bowens is proud of earning a meritorius advacement to petty officer second class in 2017 at her last command. She has also earned her Information Warfare and Air Warfare qualification pins and is currently working toward her Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist qualification.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Bowens and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy has helped me with my time-management and taking personal goals seriously. I have been set up for success,” said Bowens. “I love being in Spain and how close-by everything is. The beach is five minutes from my house and I go down every day and watch the sunset.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2010 Armiso High School graduate and Suisun City, Louisiana, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Lt. Zachary Braida is an anti-submarine warfare officer aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy anti-submarine warfare officer is responsible for anti-submarine warfare mission area and the sonar technicians in the combat acoustics division.

Braida credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Suisun City.

“I have learned to work hard, never quit and to treat others the way you want to be treated,” said Braida.

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Braida, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Braida is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“My father and grandfather served in the military,” said Braida. “It is an honor to follow in their footsteps.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Braida has found many great rewards.

Braida is proud of earning the title of division officer and leading the outstanding sailors in his division.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Braida and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy forced me to learn to balance and multi-task in high pressure situations and helped me to develop my leadership skills through both success and failure,” said Braida. “I also love it here in Spain. We have an excellent opportunity to frequently and affordably travel all throughout Europe.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2014 Rison High School graduate and New Edinburg, Arizona, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Jokenzie Broughton is a gunner’s mate aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy gunner’s mate is responsible for for the upkeep of the MK41 vertical launching system and the operation and maintenance of the small arms and crew-served weapons on board.

Broughton credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in New Edinburg.

“Growing up, I learned that respect and manners take you a long way,” said Broughton. “Don’t stress out, deal with problems as they come.”

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Broughton, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Broughton is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“Both of my grandfathers served in the military, one in the Marines and the other in the Army,” said Broughton. “The decision to join the Navy was one I made on my own.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Broughton has found many great rewards.

Broughton is proud of earning a nomination for Junior Sailor of the Quarter. He received praise for his leadership and the accomplishments of the team.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Broughton and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy taught me that you can’t take on everything yourself, there are different workloads for different people at different levels,” said Broughton. “I also love being in Spain. We get a chance to experience the different culture and hear the many languages of Europe.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2010 Bozeman High School graduate and Panama City, Florida, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Kyle Brown is a gas turbine systems technician (electrical) aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy gas turbine systems technician (electrical) is responsible for the operation and maintenance of gas turbine engines that drive the ship.

Brown credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Panama City.

“Being in the water so much and working for a local dive shop prepared me to be a Search and Rescue Swimmer,” said Brown.

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Brown, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Brown is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“My father was in the Navy,” said Brown. “He has always been my hero and I know I make him proud of my service in the Navy.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Brown has found many great rewards.

Brown is proud of earning his achievement of becoming a search and rescue swimmer. The preparation and dedication to the certification paid off when he earned the SAR certification.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Brown and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy has given me the tools and experience to become a better leader,” said Brown. “Spain has been amazing. I love the opportunities to see so much of this beautiful country.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2009 Norristown Area High School graduate and Norristown, Pennsylvania, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Rasahn Clark is a quartermaster aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy quartermaster is responsible for safe navigation of the ship.

Clark credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Norristown.

“Some lessons that I learned growing up in Norristown would be to never quit no matter what situation is presented, you should always stand tall,” said Clark. “I also learned that family comes first.”

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Clark, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Clark is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“I have a lot of family that have served in the military in the past as well as the present,” said Clark. “All of them were a huge influence on my choice to join, especially to join the Navy.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Clark has found many great rewards.

Clark is proud of earning a Navy and Marine Corps Acheivement Medal for receiving the highest score on the ship during an inspection.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Clark and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“Serving in the Navy has taught me to have patience and always remain professional,” said Clark.

ROTA, Spain – A 1997 Dana Hills High School graduate and Dana Point, California, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Command Master Chief David Marcus is the command master chief aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy command master chief is responsible for the care and feeding of sailors, enlisted and officers, as well as the commanding officer’s liaison to the enlisted personnel onboard.

Marcus credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Dana Point.

“Growing up in southern California, my dad taught me to have a hard work ethic and if it’s not broke, break and make it better, and I’ve applied that to my Navy career,” said Marcus.

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Marcus, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Marcus is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“My grandfather was a dentist in the Navy and my father was in the Marines,” said Marcus. “None of them directly influenced me to join. I was working at an Applebees and soon quit to go to a recruiting office.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Marcus has found many great rewards.

Marcus is proud of earning the first west coast Battle “E” aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Marcus and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“Being in the Navy has made me a better person,” said Marcus. “I am completely different from the 19 year old I was when I joined. The Navy allowed me to flourish. The rank structure gave me the opportunity to really impact my sailors and how to make them better personally and professionally.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2000 University of Houston graduate and Pasadena, Texas, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Cmdr. Tyson Young is a commanding officer aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy commanding officer is responsible for the command of ‘505 feet of American fighting steel’ within the U.S. 6th fleet area of operations and the care of her 325 sailors on board.

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Young, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Young is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“Both my grandfathers were in the military. On my mother’s side my grandfather was in the Army Air Corps just before it became the Air Force. On my father’s side, my grandfather was in the Marines,” said Young. “Growing up, I had a fascination with the military service. The Navy had the best program at the time and I joined during my senior year of college at the University of Houston.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Young has found many great rewards.

Young is proud of the opportunity to command and lead the sailors onboard the Carney. The privilige to lead sailors is very fulfilling, he said.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Young and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy has allowed me the amazing honor to lead and manage people and prepared me to be a successful commander at sea,” said Young. “Being homeported in Spain offers our crew some amazing travel opportunities. The ability to easily travel around Europe and take my familiy to different countries is very rewarding and right here in Rota we experience constant sunshine and great welcoming atmosphere.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2014 LaPine High School graduate and LaPine, Oregon, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Mkenzie Conard is a hospital corpsman aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy hospital corpsman is responsible for shipboard medical readiness, immunizations, sick call in addition to special physicals for sailors.

Conard credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in LaPine.

“The lessons I have learned growing up in my hometown are that you have to work for everything that you have and that nothing is given to you,” said Conard. “Learning that lesson has helped me throughout my Navy career.”

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Conard, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Conard is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“My aunt Laura Conard was actually a Navy corpsman,” said Conard. “She greatly influenced my decision to join. She always encouraged me to pursue my dreams of becoming a nurse.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Conard has found many great rewards.

Conard is proud of earning a Joint Service Achievement Medal for efforts while working in neonatal intensive care unit.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Conard and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy has tremendously aided in my professional development,” said Conard. “The Navy has given me so many opportunities to be part of a team, lead as well as train and learn from some of the best.”

ROTA, Spain – A 2009 Kamiakin High School graduate and Kennewick, Washington, native is serving our country in the Navy, living on the coast of Spain, and participating in a critical NATO ballistic missile defense (BMD) mission while assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Carney.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Garrett Cook is a culinary specialist aboard one of the four advanced warships forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, a small village on the country’s southwest coast 65 miles south of the city of Seville.

A Navy culinary specialist is responsible for the morale of the crew by providing three healthy and tasty meals a day. They also inventory and order supplies for the ship’s galley.

Cook credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Kennewick.

“Back home, I attended a culinary arts program which gave me a definite edge when it comes to cooking in the Navy,” said Cook.

These four destroyers are forward-deployed in Rota to fulfill the United States’ phased commitment to NATO BMD while also carrying out a wide range of missions to support the security of Europe.

According to the NATO website, many countries have, or are trying to develop ballistic missiles. The ability to acquire these capabilities does not necessarily mean there is an immediate intent to attack NATO, but that the alliance has a responsibility to take any possible threat into account as part of its core task of collective defense.

U.S. Navy Aegis ballistic missile defense provides scalability, flexibility and mobility. These systems are equally beneficial to U.S. assets, allies and regional partners in all areas of the world. Positioning four ballistic missile defense ships in Spain provides an umbrella of protection to forward-deployed forces, friends and allies while contributing to a broader defense of the United States.

Guided-missile destroyers are 510 feet long warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. The ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles, advanced gun systems, close-in gun systems and long-range missiles to counter the threat to friendly forces posed by manned aircraft, anti-ship, cruise and tactical ballistic missiles.

Destroyers are deployed globally and can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups or amphibious readiness groups. Their presence helps the Navy control the sea. Sea control is the necessity for everything the Navy does. The Navy cannot project power, secure the commons, deter aggression, or assure allies without the ability to control the seas when and where desired.

The ship is named after Adm. Robert Bostwick Carney, who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Eisenhower administration.

“We have an outstanding team here and I am honored to lead one of the finest, most capable crews in the U.S. Navy,” said Cmdr. Tyson Young, commanding officer of USS Carney. “Their continued efforts keep us as an integral part of U.S. 6th Fleet’s presence in the region.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Cook, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Cook is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“My mother served in the Army,” said Cook. “Some of the stories she told me about and all the cool things she did during her service influenced me to join and serve.”

While serving in the Navy may present many challenges, Cook has found many great rewards.

Cook is proud of earning a position on the USNS Mercy hospital ship, which provided humanitarian aid to five Southwest Asian countries.

Unique experiences build strong fellowship among the crew of more than 300 women and men aboard Carney. Their hard work and professionalism are a testament to the namesake’s dedication and the ship’s motto, “Resolute, Committed, Successful.” The crew is motivated, and can quickly adapt to changing conditions, according to Navy officials. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills. Serving aboard a guided-missile destroyer instills accountability and toughness and fosters initiative and integrity.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Cook and other Carney sailors know they are a part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy has helped me to develop great problem-solving skills and the ability to look at issues from a different perspective,” said Cook. “My favorite part about living in Spain is being able to drive anywhere in Europe if I want.”

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