Falls, ODOT, Election, OWU


Staff Reports



Seeking community partners to help take “10 Million Steps to Prevent Falls”

Aug. 8, 2018

Department of Aging’s falls prevention initiative uses statewide event to mark Falls Prevention Awareness Day, raise awareness of falls and the many ways to prevent them

Columbus, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Aging is calling upon community partners to celebrate Falls Prevention Awareness Day on Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, by hosting a local “10 Million Steps to Prevent Falls” event. Because walking and other regular exercise are among the best things older adults can do to lower their risk of a life-altering fall, the department’s STEADY U Ohio initiative aims to have at least 4,000 Ohioans take a one-mile walk to raise awareness and promote education about falls prevention.

“Aging and fall prevention really are everybody’s business, and we are calling on Ohio’s communities to help us protect our elders,” said Beverley L. Laubert, director of the department. “A fall can prevent an employee or their caregiver from being at work, keep a valued customer from your business, or create strains on families and community supports. However, falls are not a normal part of aging, and most falls can be prevented.”

Community partners, such as businesses, senior centers, local government agencies, churches, schools and other organizations, can participate in “10 Million Steps to Prevent Falls” by organizing a walking group or hosting a one-mile (minimum) falls prevention awareness walk for their staff, partners and consumers on (or around) Sept. 21, 2018. Potential venues include around your business or facility, indoor and outdoor walking tracks, YMCAs, community/state/metro parks, walking/bike paths, hiking trails, city sidewalks, malls and more. Visit www.steadyu.ohio.gov to learn more and register your event.

The Department of Aging will begin sharing available “10 Million Steps” events and groups on its STEADY U Ohio website in mid-August.

This is the fourth year for “10 Million Steps.” Last year, 53 community partners hosted 57 walking groups or events in which 4,935 individuals of all ages walked more than 22,000 miles. In addition, individuals around the state contributed by walking and posting selfies to social media with the hashtags #PreventFalls and #10MStepsOH.

Facts about falls in Ohio:

One in three Ohioans over age 60 will fall this year, yet fewer than half will talk to their doctors about their risk or history of falls.

Falls are the number one cause of injuries leading to ER visits, hospitalizations and deaths for older Ohioans.

While older Ohioans make up approximately 16 percent of our state’s population, they account for more than 85 percent of fatal falls.

The total estimated annual medical cost of falls is $1.1 billion in Ohio. Add costs related to work loss and the total climbs to $1.9 billion annually, or $5.2 million each day.

The causes of falls vary, but risk factors include lower body weakness, use of multiple medications, reduced vision, chronic conditions and unsafe homes.

Visit www.steadyu.ohio.gov for falls prevention tips and resources. While there, you can take an online falls risk assessment and learn about “A Matter of Balance,” a community-based falls prevention program.

About STEADY U Ohio – Falls are an epidemic among our elders and are the number one cause of injuries leading to ER visits, hospital stays and deaths in Ohioans age 65-plus. STEADY U Ohio is a comprehensive falls prevention initiative led by Governor John Kasich and the Ohio Department of Aging and supported by Ohio government and state business partners to strengthen existing falls prevention activities, identify opportunities for new initiatives and coordinate a statewide educational campaign to bring falls prevention to the forefront of planning for individuals, families, health care providers, business and community leaders and all Ohioans. Visit www.steadyu.ohio.gov.

North Side:

I-71 South Closed at I-270

crash

All lanes of I-71 south are closed at I-270 on the North Side due to a crash. The following ramps are also closed:

I-270 east & west to I-71 south

Morse Rd. to I-71 south

SR 161 to I-71 south

Duration unknown.

North Side:

I-71 South Now Open

I 71

All lanes of I-71 south are now open between I-270 and Cooke Road on the North Side. Crews are in the process of reopening all of the ramps as well.

SR 37 Closure Next Week, West of Johnstown

37

Beginning Monday, August 20, SR 37 will be closed to traffic just east of Downing Road, between Johnstown and the Delaware County line for a culvert replacement.

Estimated completion: Friday, August 24, weather permitting

Detour: SR 37 to US 62 to SR 605

US 40 Closure in Jacksontown on Saturday

40

On Saturday, August 18, US 40 will be closed to traffic just east of SR 13 while ODOT crews work on replacing a culvert.

US 40 will close at 7:00am Saturday morning and reopen to traffic Sunday by 12:00pm.

Work will resume on Monday, August 20, with US 40 restricted to one lane.

Estimated completion: Monday, August 20, weather permitting

Detour: SR 668 to I-70 to SR 13 to US 40

NORTHERN FRANKLIN COUNTY

270 N Franklin

I-270 at SR 315

9 PM TONIGHT: The ramp from I-270 EB to SR 315 NB will close for paving. DETOUR: I-270 EB to SR 315 SB to SR 161 to SR 315 NB.

9 PM: The ramp from I-270 WB to SR 315 NB will close for paving. DETOUR: I-270 WB to SR 315 SB to SR 161 to SR 315 NB.

10 PM: The ramp from SR 315 NB to I-270 WB will close for paving. DETOUR: SR 315 NB to I-270 EB to US 23 to I-270 WB.

5 AM TOMORROW: All lanes open.

70 Franklin

I-70 between Kelton Ave. and 3rd St.

9 PM TONIGHT: The ramp from Miller Ave. to I-70 WB will be closed for paving. DETOUR: Main St. WB to Parson Ave. NB to Broad St. WB to I-71.

10 PM: I-70 WB will be reduced to two lanes for paving.

11 PM: I-70 WB will be reduced to one lane for paving.

11 PM: The ramp from I-70 WB to I-71 NB will be reduced to one lane for paving.

11 PM: The ramp from I-70 EB to I-71 NB will be reduced to one lane for paving.

11 PM: The ramp from I-670 EB to I-71 SB will close for paving. DETOUR: I-670 EB to Leonard Ave. to I-670 WB to I-71 SB.

11 PM: The ramp from Cleveland Ave. to I-71 SB will close for paving. DETOUR: Cleveland Ave. to I-670 EB to Leonard Ave. to I-670 WB to I-71 SB.

MIDNIGHT: I-71 SB will be reduced to two lanes between Long St. and Town St. for paving.

5 AM TOMORROW: All lanes open.

71 N Franklin

I-71 between Weber Rd. and E. North Broadway

8 PM TONIGHT: I-71 NB will be reduced to two lanes for barrier work.

5 AM TOMORROW: All lanes open.

SR 315 between SR 161 and Hard Rd.

10 PM TONIGHT: SR 315 NB will be reduced to one lane for paving.

5 AM TOMORROW: All lanes open.

SR 315 between 3rd Ave. and King Ave.

7 PM TONIGHT: SR 315 NB will be reduced to two lanes for bridge work.

9 PM: SR 315 NB will be reduced to one lane for bridge work.

5 AM TOMORROW: All lanes open.

SR 315 between I-670 and US 40

7 PM TONIGHT: SR 315 NB will be reduced to two lanes for bridge work.

7 PM: The ramp from SR 315 NB to US 33 will close for bridge work. DETOUR: SR 315 NB to I-670 EB to Neil Ave. SB to Spring St.

10 PM: SR 315 SB will be reduced to two lanes for bridge work.

10 PM: The ramp from I-670 WB to SR 315 will close for bridge work. DETOUR: I-670 WB to Grandview Ave. to US 33 EB to SR 315 SB.

5 AM TOMORROW: All lanes open.

August 13, 2018

Attorney General DeWine Announces Guilty Plea in Stolen Inheritance Case

(NORWALK, Ohio)— Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced today that an Ohio woman has pleaded guilty to stealing more than $100,000 in inheritance money from two children whose father died more than ten years ago.

Stacie Bement, 45, of Wakeman pleaded guilty today to two felony charges of grand theft and five felony charges of forgery.

An investigation by the Norwalk Police Department found that Bement stole the money from two trusts that the children’s father created for them before his death in 2007.

Investigators found that Bement accessed the trusts by forging the signature of her husband, who was the trust custodian. She transferred the life insurance money to her personal bank account on multiple occasions between 2008 and 2012 and spent the money on a car, mortgage, and living expenses.

“Our number one goal in this case is to get the full inheritance back for these kids, because this defendant took every last penny that their father left them,” said Attorney General DeWine. “A condition in this plea agreement is that the defendant must repay the entire amount she owes prior to her sentencing date.”

Each child stands to receive more than $50,000 in restitution.

The investigation found that Bement, who was an area teacher at the time of her arrest in May, stole a total of nearly $100,000 in principal from the trusts, plus several thousand dollars in interest. She also created fictitious financial statements that made it appear as if the funds were still in the bank.

A sentencing date has been set for November 15, 2018.

The case is being prosecuted by attorneys with Attorney General DeWine’s Special Prosecutions Section.

Rob Richardson to hold joint press event with Congresswoman Marcia Fudge in Cleveland

CLEVELAND, OH – This Wednesday, Democratic nominee for Ohio Treasurer Rob Richardson will hold a joint press conference with Congresswoman Marcia Fudge in Cleveland. Mr. Richardson and Congresswoman Fudge and gathering to discuss the impact of the GOP Tax Cut and Jobs Act, as well as pushing for major pharmaceutical companies to play a larger role in combating the ongoing opioid crisis. The goal of the conference is to directly address how political leadership and the private sector must do more to uplift Ohio’s most vulnerable citizens.

Secretary Husted Addresses Misinformation & Misleading Claims Regarding Recent Special Election

Monday, August 13, 2018

COLUMBUS – As county board of elections in the 12th Congressional District continue working to fulfill their statutory responsibilities in preparing for the start of the official canvass following last Tuesday’s special election, it is important to dispel misleading claims of election tampering and voter fraud regarding the election. From mischaracterizing elements of voter registration policies, raising alarm over an oversight during the official canvass, and making erroneous claims with no basis in reality, this misinformation only aims to diminish the merits of a well-run election resulting in a very close contest. Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted has released the following statement:

“Anytime you have a close election that receives intense local and national attention, like the one held last week for Ohio’s 12th Congressional District, there will inevitably be those who seek to sow seeds of doubt about the process and call into question how the election has been administered.

“The fact is that what I said last Tuesday remains the case today. That the bipartisan county boards of elections who administered the special election did so with the professionalism that has become the standard in Ohio.

“However, to those who are attempting to mislead voters that county election officials are not counting all eligible ballots, or that somehow voter fraud is a problem in this election, I would point out a few facts.

“First, I can assure all voters who participated in last Tuesday’s election that all eligible ballots will be counted – no exceptions. It is also important to keep in mind that the results provided on Tuesday are unofficial and the official results will not be available until county boards of elections complete the official canvass, which must be done by August 24.

“As to concerns of potential voter fraud, my office has done a lot to clean up the voter rolls. During my tenure, we have removed more than 680,000 deceased voters, reconciled nearly two million duplicate registrations, and now have complete information on over 90 percent of voters – up from just 20 percent when I took office in 2011. As I have always said, while voter fraud exists, it is rare and we hold those who commit it accountable.

“Additionally, those who want to engage in spreading a blatantly false narrative wholly detached from reality should find better ways to spend their time. Every candidate that appeared on the ballot this past Tuesday met the legal requirements and earned the right to be a candidate.

“In Ohio, we run fair and open elections with integrity because we want voters to have confidence in the outcome of every contest. I am confident that county boards will approach the official canvass and certification of results with the same level of professionalism that they did on Election Day. I am also confident that the final vote count will be accurate and reflect the will of the voters.

“To the bad actors out there who want chaos and to erode the people’s confidence in our elections, enough is enough.”

Additional Information

Voter Registrations – State law has not always required Ohioans to provide their date of birth when registering to vote. Prior to June 1974, when House Bill 662 was passed requiring date of birth to register to vote, county boards of election used placeholder dates. This is why some registrations have dates like 1900 or 1800 listed. These individuals met the requirements at the time to become registered voters and remain legally qualified electors today.

Unaccounted & Outstanding Ballots – County boards of elections are required to tabulate and report all ballots received and cast by the close of the polls on Election Day. In a situation like the one reported in Franklin County, the board’s first priority is to resolve the problem, which they have done. The Secretary of State’s office will work with the board to determine why this happened and how to ensure the error is not repeated. The Secretary of State’s office is confident that as board’s spokesperson explained, this incident was the result of human error and not some conspiracy to impact the outcome of the race.

Candidates – Individuals who appeared on the ballot as a candidate for the 12th Congressional District met all constitutional and statutory requirements, which are outlined in the Ohio Candidate Requirement Guide starting on page two for the office of U.S. Representative.

Wet weather to perpetuate flood threat in the Northeast early this week

Whether 5 inches of rain falls in as many days or an inch of rain falls in an hour, enough rain is expected to fall to lead to rising rivers and urban and small stream flooding.

For expert AccuWeather meteorologist commentary, analysis or interviews 24X7, please contact pr@AccuWeather.com.

AccuWeather Global Weather Center – August 8, 2018 – Dangerous flooding that has already hit across portions of Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York state and Massachusetts will worsen over the coming days as rounds of heavy rain inundate the northeastern United States.

During Friday night, flooding downpours hit portions of Ohio and southwestern Pennsylvania.

On Saturday, portions of northern New Jersey and the New York City area were hit hard by torrential rain and flooding.

During Monday morning, multiple water rescues were performed in southeastern Pennsylvania. In Bradford County, Pennsylvania, water was flowing over a portion of U.S. Route 220. Flooding occurred in Monmouth County, New Jersey.

More flooding is likely from the latest, slow moving storm to affect the region.

“Whether 5 inches of rain falls in as many days or an inch of rain falls in an hour, enough rain is expected to fall to lead to rising rivers and urban and small stream flooding,” warned AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.

Static NE Thru Tues

A system is expected to track slowly across the Northeast through Tuesday, promoting widespread wet weather.

While showers and thunderstorms will tend to fill-in from Ohio to New Hampshire and South Carolina into Monday night, communities from Pennsylvania to New Jersey and New York state and southwestern New England should brace for another round of torrential rainfall and flooding.

About AccuWeather, Inc. and AccuWeather.com

More than 1.5 billion people worldwide rely on AccuWeather to help them plan their lives, protect their businesses, and get more from their day. AccuWeather provides hourly and Minute by Minute™ forecasts with Superior Accuracy™ with customized content and engaging video presentations available on smartphones, tablets, free wired and mobile Internet sites, connected TVs, and Internet appliances, as well as via radio, television, and newspapers. Established in 1962 by Founder, President, and Chairman Dr. Joel N. Myers—a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society who was recognized as one of the top entrepreneurs in American history by Entrepreneur Magazine’s Encyclopedia of Entrepreneurs—AccuWeather also delivers a wide range of highly customized enterprise solutions to media, business, government, and institutions, as well as news, weather content, and video for more than 180,000 third-party websites.

Download the AccuWeather app today and follow AccuWeather on Facebook and Twitter for the most up-to-date forecasts and warnings, news and information surrounding breaking and spring weather. Visit www.AccuWeather.com for additional information.

Ohio Wesleyan to Explore Art’s Power and Potential During Sagan National Colloquium

Aug. 13, 2018

ART AND ENGAGEMENT

DELAWARE – Ohio Wesleyan University’s 2018-2019 Sagan National Colloquium will explore “Art and Engagement,” showcasing artists and academics working to improve the world through their creative skills, scholarship, and service.

“This year’s colloquium understands art to be an essential part of building cultural heritage, a framework for understanding ourselves in the present moment, and a means for imagining a collective future,” said Erin Fletcher, director of the Richard M. Ross Art Museum and director of this year’s colloquium. “The presenters, exhibitors, and performers will help us to imagine what our tomorrow may look like so that we can make better decisions today.”

The Sagan National Colloquium – an OWU tradition since 1984 – will kick off at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 28 with a free choral performance by The Harmony Project, in Benes Rooms A and B of Ohio Wesleyan’s Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave., Delaware. Visitors are invited to park in the campus center’s east lot, located on Spring Street between Sandusky and Franklin streets.

Following the performance, David Brown, founder and creative director of The Harmony Project, will participate in a roundtable discussion about the Columbus, Ohio-based organization and its work to connect people across social divides through experiential arts, education, and volunteer community service.

What began in 2009 with fewer than 100 voices has grown to more than 1,000 people dedicated to building a stronger, more inclusive community. Learn more about Harmony Project at www.harmonyproject.com. This event is presented in collaboration with Ohio Wesleyan’s Department of Music.

Additional events scheduled for “Art and Engagement,” Ohio Wesleyan’s 2018-2019 Sagan National Colloquium include the following: (For the latest, most up-to-date schedule, visit www.owu.edu/snc.)

Aug. 22-Oct. 7 – “What We Make,” an exhibition drawing upon “socially and politically engaged art practices to consider how we build communities that are capable of working together across difference.”

In addition to traditional media, the exhibit will incorporate sound and video, and selections from the Interference Archive. “What We Make” will fill all four galleries in the university’s Ross Art Museum, 60 S. Sandusky St., Delaware.

The exhibit’s diverse artist list includes Doug Ashford, Robby Herbst, Tomashi Jackson, Christine Sun-Kim, Anna Teresa Fernandez, and 2013 OWU alumnus Andrew Wilson.

Curated by Fletcher and Ashley Biser, Ph.D., associate professor of politics and government, the exhibition will feature a curator-led tour at 4 p.m. Aug. 23 followed by a public reception from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.

During the academic year, the Ross is open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum is handicap-accessible and admission is always free. Call (740) 368-3606 or visit www.owu.edu/ross for more information.

7 p.m. Sept. 6 – Sharif Bey, Ph.D., a ceramicist and associate professor of art at Syracuse University, discusses his work as an artist, educator, and art-teacher mentor.

Bey’s ceramic/mixed-media artworks examine traditional and contemporary notions of function, ritual, and identity, and his current research explores the identity and political agency of African-American artists. He will speak in Benes Room B of Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave., Delaware.

Learn more about Bey at www.sharifbeyceramics.com.

1 p.m. Sept. 8 – Sara Trail discusses the California-based Social Justice Sewing Academy and the group’s OWU quilt exhibit, “We Hold These Truths: Artistic Voices of Youth.”

The Social Justice Sewing Academy (SJSA) empowers young people to use sewing and quilting to express themselves and create opportunities for growth and change.

Trail, founder and executive director of SJSA, will share insights about the academy and discuss the young artists who represent the “resilience, brilliance, and existence of promising individuals who are most at-risk for their dreams to be deferred and their life outcomes marginalized because of America’s unresolved racist and entitled history.” She will speak in the Bayley Room on the second floor of Beeghly Library, 43 Rowland Ave., Delaware. Learn more about SJSA at www.sjsacademy.com.

Trail’s presentation will be followed by a hands-on workshop from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the same venue. Pre-registration is required for the workshop and is limited to 25 people. Cost is $10 for adults, free for students. To register, call (740) 368-3606, email ramuseum@owu.edu, or visit www.owu.edu/snc.

The “We Hold These Truths: Artistic Voices of Youth” quilt exhibition is on display now through Sept. 25 in Beeghly Library’s Gallery 2001. Curated by Tammy Wallace, associate director of the Ross Art Museum, the exhibit is open during library hours, available online at https://library.owu.edu.

4:15 p.m. and 5:15 p.m. Sept. 11 –Laurie Jo Reynolds, M.F.A., of the University of Illinois at Chicago, presents a lecture followed by an RSVP-required talk-back and dinner exploring, “We Shouldn’t Have Criminal Justice Policies We Are Afraid to Talk About.”

An assistant professor of social justice in UIC’s School of Art and Art History, Reynolds’ work challenges the demonization, warehousing, and social exclusion of people in the criminal legal system. Learn more about Reynolds at http://artandarthistory.uic.edu/profile/laurie-jo-reynolds.

To evaluate state responses to sexual abuse and violence, it is necessary to know what the policies are. In the 1990s, state legislatures began establishing public registries, public exclusion zones, and laws restricting housing, employment, education, travel, loitering, and even holiday activity. Some states now have up to five different conviction registries.

Reynolds uses artistic and cultural approaches to consider some of the unintended consequences of public registration and notification laws, and related restrictions, and how they represent a missed opportunity for both prevention and justice.

Both events will be held in Benes Room B of Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave., Delaware.

Reservations are required for the 5:15 p.m. dinner, presented in collaboration with the Ohio Wesleyan Department of Philosophy. To register, email professor Shari Stone-Mediatore, Ph.D., at ssstonem@owu.edu.

1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Sept. 21 – Black Quantum Futurism (BQF) Collective of Philadelphia presents workshops on “Alternative Temporalities and Quantum Event Mapping.”

BQF Collective – a collaboration between musician and poet Camae Ayewa and public interest attorney, author, and Afrofuturist Rasheedah Phillips – explores personal, cultural, familial, and communal cycles of experience, and solutions for transforming negative cycles into positive ones using artistic and holistic methods of healing.

The workshops will explore linear time constructs in contrast to indigenous African and Afro-diasporic traditions of space, time, and the future. They will explore alternative and Black-womanist temporalities as well as how to build future maps and quantum time capsules, shift cause-and-effect, and the interaction between timescapes and soundscapes. Learn more about Black Quantum Futurism Collective at www.blackquantumfuturism.com.

Workshop capacity is limited to 15 people per 90-minute session, with the 1 p.m. session reserved for the Ohio Wesleyan campus community. The workshops will be held at the Ross Art Museum, 60 S. Sandusky St., Delaware. To register, call (740) 368-3606, email ramuseum@owu.edu, or visit www.owu.edu/snc.

4:15 p.m. Sept. 26 and 7 p.m. Sept. 27 – Interdisciplinary artist and critical writer Robby Herbst of Los Angeles presents a free artist’s talk and “I+We” workshop.

On Sept. 26, Herbst will discuss how politics, language, and ideology are manifested in bodies as expression, movement, history, and action. He will speak at the Ross Art Museum, 60 S. Sandusky St., Delaware, where his work will be on display from Aug. 22 through Oct. 7 as part of the larger “What We Make” exhibit. Learn more about Herbst at http://cargocollective.com/robbyherbst.

On Sept. 27, Herbst will host an “I+We” workshop, a free experimental and participatory (political) movement exploration that borrows techniques from dance, social sculpture, and New Games to explore collective identity, play, and movement.

The 90-minute workshop also will be held at the Ross. Capacity is limited to 20 people. To register, call (740) 368-3606, email ramuseum@owu.edu, or visit www.owu.edu/snc.

Oct. 18-Dec. 13 – “Culinary Roots/Migratory Routes,” an art exhibit exploring food production and consumption.

The exhibit shows that “how what we eat is not just a source of nourishment but a force that creates, dissolves, and reforms communities as immigrants both preserve and lose the taste of home.” It will be on display at the Richard M. Ross Art Museum, 60 S. Sandusky St., Delaware.

“Culinary Roots/Migratory Routes” is curated by Nancy Comorau, Ph.D., associate professor of English, and student curatorial-assistant Anna Davies, a senior from St. Clairsville, Ohio. It will feature a curator-led tour at 4 p.m. Oct. 25 followed by a public reception from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.

During the academic year, the Ross is open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum is handicap-accessible and admission is always free. Call (740) 368-3606 or visit www.owu.edu/ross for more information.

4:10 p.m. Oct. 3 –Kiese Laymon, M.F.A., professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi, presents “What’s the Point in Lying if You Don’t Want to Get Caught?”

Laymon is the author of the novel “Long Division” and a collection of essays titled “How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America.” During his presentation, he will discuss the intersection of writing and activism from his personal experiences.

His talk is presented in collaboration with the Department of English’s Poets and Writers Series and will be held in the Bayley Room on the second floor of Beeghly Library, 43 Rowland Ave., Delaware. Learn more about Laymon at http://www.kieselaymon.com.

8 p.m. Oct. 4-6 and 2 p.m. Oct. 7 – Theatre production of “Cloud 9” by Caryl Churchill, directed by OWU senior Ares Harper of Columbus, Ohio.

Gender and power face-off in this masterful comedy, where people’s disjointed identities relate to their lack of autonomy. Join these sexually repressed characters on a journey that transcends time and space, as they fight to find their place in a swirling world of self-discovery. Contains adult themes and strong language.

“Cloud 9” will be performed on the Main Stage inside Chappelear Drama Center, 45 Rowland Ave., Delaware. Tickets to this OWU Department of Theatre & Dance production are $10 for general admission and $5 for senior citizens, Ohio Wesleyan employees, and non-OWU students. Admission is free for Ohio Wesleyan students with a valid university ID. To reserve tickets, call the box office one week before opening night at (740) 368-3855. Learn more at www.owu.edu/TheatreAndDance.

Oct. 1-Dec. 15 – “Stateless,” an exhibit of portraits by Columbus, Ohio-based photographer Tariq Tarey depicting people who, under national laws, no longer enjoy citizenship in any country.

Tarey’s insightful portraits capture the self-defined identity that led these now-stateless individuals to make the sacrifice of leaving their countries. The exhibition will be on display in Beeghly Library’s Gallery 2001, 43 Rowland Ave., Delaware.

At 7 p.m. Oct. 18, Tarey will present an artist’s talk in the library gallery, followed by an exhibit reception. The exhibit is curated by Tammy Wallace, associate director of the Ross Art Museum. The exhibit is open during Beeghly Library hours, available online at https://library.owu.edu.

6 p.m. Oct. 26 – Archaeologist William Lipe, Ph.D., presents “Rock Art, Cliff Dwellings, and the Battle Over Bears Ears.”

President Barack Obama established the Bears Ears National Monument in 2016 as a 1.35-million-acre tract in southeastern Utah. In 2017, the Trump Administration reduced it to two smaller monuments.

Lipe, a retired Yale University professor with expertise in the North American Southwest, has conducted research in the Bears Ears area for more than 50 years. He will show examples of its rock art and architectural treasures and discuss its scholarly and public importance, including what is needed to protect it.

His 90-minute presentation will be held in Benes Room B of Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave., Delaware. Learn more about Lipe at https://anthro.wsu.edu/faculty-and-staff/william-d-lipe.

8 p.m. Oct. 27 – Theatre production of “How to Be a Respectable Junkie” by Greg Vovos, starring Christopher M. Bohan.

Based on a true story, this guest-artist event provides a humorous, heartbreaking, and ultimately hopeful look into the nation’s opioid crisis, an in-depth look into the troubled soul of a Northeast Ohio man caught in heroin’s deadly grip. Contains depictions of drug use and adult language.

The performance will be held in the Studio Theatre inside Chappelear Drama Center, 45 Rowland Ave., Delaware, and conclude with a post-show discussion with the actor, playwright, and members of the OWU and Delaware communities. Tickets are free but required because of limited seating. To reserve tickets, call the box office after Oct. 22 at (740) 368-3855. Learn more at www.owu.edu/TheatreAndDance.

4:10 p.m. Nov. 5 – Terese Mailhot, M.F.A., author of “Heart Berries: A Memoir,” presents a reading from her New York Times-bestselling book.

Mailhot is a Native American author from Seabird Island Band and postdoctoral fellow in the English Department at Purdue University. In addition to reading from “Heart Berries,” she will share thoughts on the power of activism through writing. Her presentation will conclude with an audience question-and-answer session and book-signing.

Reviewer Parul Sehgal has described “Heart Berries” as seeking “to find new ways to think about the past, trauma, repetition and reconciliation, which might be a way of saying a new model for the memoir.”

Mailhot’s reading is presented in collaboration with the Ohio Wesleyan Department of English’s Poets and Writers Series. Learn more about her at www.teresemailhot.com.

About the Sagan National Colloquium

Now in its 34th year, the Sagan National Colloquium seeks annually to address in-depth an issue of national or global importance. The colloquium is funded by an endowment from 1948 OWU alumni Margaret Pickett Sagan and John Sagan, both deceased. Past colloquium speakers have included social activist Gloria Steinem, authors Barbara Ehrenreich and Kurt Vonnegut, Nobel Peace Prize winner Jody Williams, and former President Gerald Ford. Learn more at www.owu.edu/snc.

About Ohio Wesleyan University

Founded in 1842, Ohio Wesleyan University is one of the nation’s premier liberal arts universities. Located in Delaware, Ohio, the private university offers more than 90 undergraduate majors and competes in 25 NCAA Division III varsity sports. Through Ohio Wesleyan’s signature OWU Connection program, students integrate knowledge across disciplines, build a diverse and global perspective, and apply their knowledge in real-world settings. Ohio Wesleyan is featured in the book “Colleges That Change Lives” and included in the U.S. News & World Report and Princeton Review “best colleges” lists. Learn more at www.owu.edu.

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Staff Reports