Paul Simon’s farewell tour


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FILE - In a Sept. 22, 2016 file photo, musician Paul Simon performs during the Global Citizen Festival, in New York.  Simon wraps up his farewell concert tour Saturday, Sept. 22, 2018 at a park in Queens, a bicycle ride across the borough from where he grew up. The 76-year-old singer picked Flushing Meadows Corona Park to say goodbye, an outdoor show on the first night of autumn.   (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

FILE - In a Sept. 22, 2016 file photo, musician Paul Simon performs during the Global Citizen Festival, in New York. Simon wraps up his farewell concert tour Saturday, Sept. 22, 2018 at a park in Queens, a bicycle ride across the borough from where he grew up. The 76-year-old singer picked Flushing Meadows Corona Park to say goodbye, an outdoor show on the first night of autumn. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)


Paul Simon wraps up farewell tour back home

By DAVID BAUDER

AP Media Writer

Monday, September 24

NEW YORK (AP) — Paul Simon ended his final concert tour under a moonlit sky on home turf Saturday, telling an audience in a Queens, N.Y. park that their cheers “mean more than you can know.”

Simon performed at Flushing Meadows Corona Park, which he said was a 20-minute bicycle ride from where he grew up, ending the landmark night with his first big hit, “The Sound of Silence.”

The 76-year-old Simon isn’t retiring, and hasn’t ruled out occasional future performances. But he’s said this is his last time out on the road, and he isn’t alone among his peers; Elton John and Kiss are also doing goodbye swings.

New York City Mayor Bill DeBlasio introduced Simon, calling him “one of the greatest New York City artists of all time.” The return to New York raised memories of Simon’s two iconic shows in Manhattan’s Central Park, in 1981 with former partner Art Garfunkel and in 1991 on his own.

Simon didn’t directly address the special nature of this occasion, and his only guest was wife Edie Brickell, who came out to whistle the solo in “Me and Julio Down By the Schoolyard.” But there were many references to familiar surroundings, like when he paused and beamed at an airplane descending over the park as he prepared to sing “Homeward Bound.”

“Welcome to New York,” he said.

When Simon finished singing “Kodachrome,” with its memorable line about “the crap I learned in high school,” he said, “take that, Forest Hills High School.”

But, he conceded, “I actually had a good time there.”

The crowd cheered when Simon sang about the “queen of Corona” in “Me & Julio Down By the Schoolyard.”

“How much fun is it to sing a song about Corona in Corona?” he said.

The former high school baseball player brought out a glove and a ball, saying he wanted to play catch. He twice threw the ball into the audience and the return throws sailed over his head. But on the third, Simon caught a perfect strike.

His 26-song set spanned more than 50 years. A staple of the 1960s folk-rock scene with Garfunkel, Simon explored music from around the world as a solo artist. His band contained guitarists from Nigeria and South Africa, and a classical sextet. His recent work has been his most musically challenging, and in a new disc he revisits overlooked songs from the past four decades. He’s a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member for both stages of his career.

The only references to Garfunkel were a couple of fleeting pictures during a nostalgic montage on the video screen. As Simon prepared to sing “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” he said that “I’m going to reclaim my lost child.” He had originally given the giant hit to Garfunkel to sing.

An often dour performer, Simon has been animated and talkative during the final shows. He seems eager for the freedom that awaits him, said Robert Hilburn, who wrote the biography “Paul Simon: A Life” that was released this spring.

“The thing that strikes me is that he’s been happy, relieved,” Hilburn said. “There’s a burden off of him.”

During an earlier show in Portland, Oregon, Simon playfully “penalized” himself for flubbing the lyrics to one song by singing an old Simon & Garfunkel hit he confessed to hating: “The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy).”

The Conversation

The weird world of one-sided objects

September 24, 2018

Authors

David Gunderman

Ph.D. student in Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado

Richard Gunderman

Chancellor’s Professor of Medicine, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy, Indiana University

Disclosure statement

The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners

Indiana University provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

You have most likely encountered one-sided objects hundreds of times in your daily life – like the universal symbol for recycling, found printed on the backs of aluminum cans and plastic bottles.

This mathematical object is called a Mobius strip. It has fascinated environmentalists, artists, engineers, mathematicians and many others ever since its discovery in 1858 by August Möbius, a German mathematician who died 150 years ago, on Sept. 26, 1868.

Möbius discovered the one-sided strip in 1858 while serving as the chair of astronomy and higher mechanics at the University of Leipzig. (Another mathematician named Listing actually described it a few months earlier, but did not publish his work until 1861.) Möbius seems to have encountered the Möbius strip while working on the geometric theory of polyhedra, solid figures composed of vertices, edges and flat faces.

An animation of ants crawling along a Möbius strip, inspired by M.C. Escher’s artwork.

A Möbius strip can be created by taking a strip of paper, giving it an odd number of half-twists, then taping the ends back together to form a loop. If you take a pencil and draw a line along the center of the strip, you’ll see that the line apparently runs along both sides of the loop.

The concept of a one-sided object inspired artists like Dutch graphic designer M.C. Escher, whose woodcut “Möbius Strip II” shows red ants crawling one after another along a Möbius strip.

The Möbius strip has more than just one surprising property. For instance, try taking a pair of scissors and cutting the strip in half along the line you just drew. You may be astonished to find that you are left not with two smaller one-sided Möbius strips, but instead with one long two-sided loop. If you don’t have a piece of paper on hand, Escher’s woodcut “Möbius Strip I” shows what happens when a Möbius strip is cut along its center line.

While the strip certainly has visual appeal, its greatest impact has been in mathematics, where it helped to spur on the development of an entire field called topology.

A topologist studies properties of objects that are preserved when moved, bent, stretched or twisted, without cutting or gluing parts together. For example, a tangled pair of earbuds is in a topological sense the same as an untangled pair of earbuds, because changing one into the other requires only moving, bending and twisting. No cutting or gluing is required to transform between them.

Another pair of objects that are topologically the same are a coffee cup and a doughnut. Because both objects have just one hole, one can be deformed into the other through just stretching and bending.

The number of holes in an object is a property which can be changed only through cutting or gluing. This property – called the “genus” of an object – allows us to say that a pair of earbuds and a doughnut are topologically different, since a doughnut has one hole, whereas a pair of earbuds has no holes.

Unfortunately, a Möbius strip and a two-sided loop, like a typical silicone awareness wristband, both seem to have one hole, so this property is insufficient to tell them apart – at least from a topologist’s point of view.

Instead, the property that distinguishes a Möbius strip from a two-sided loop is called orientability. Like its number of holes, an object’s orientability can only be changed through cutting or gluing.

Imagine writing yourself a note on a see-through surface, then taking a walk around on that surface. The surface is orientable if, when you come back from your walk, you can always read the note. On a nonorientable surface, you may come back from your walk only to find that the words you wrote have apparently turned into their mirror image and can be read only from right to left. On the two-sided loop, the note will always read from left to right, no matter where your journey took you.

Since the Möbius strip is nonorientable, whereas the two-sided loop is orientable, that means that the Möbius strip and the two-sided loop are topologically different.

When the GIF starts, the dots listed off clockwise are black, blue and red. However, we can move the three-dot configuration around the Möbius strip such that the figure is in the same location, but the colors of the dots listed off clockwise are now red, blue and black. Somehow, the configuration has morphed into its own mirror image, but all we’ve done is move it around on the surface. This transformation is impossible on an orientable surface like the two-sided loop. Created by David Gunderman.

The concept of orientability has important implications. Take enantiomers. These chemical compounds have the same chemical structures except for one key difference: They are mirror images of one another. For example, the chemical L-methamphetamine is an ingredient in Vicks Vapor Inhalers. Its mirror image, D-methamphetamine, is a Class A illegal drug. If we lived in a nonorientable world, these chemicals would be indistinguishable.

August Möbius’s discovery opened up new ways to study the natural world. The study of topology continues to produce stunning results. For example, last year, topology led scientists to discover strange new states of matter. This year’s Fields Medal, the highest honor in mathematics, was awarded to Akshay Venkatesh, a mathematician who helped integrate topology with other fields such as number theory.

STRAND THEATRE HONORS PETER AND GEORGIA MANOS

Bronze plaque installed outside the Main Theater recognizes Delaware couple’s legacy

Delaware, OH – The Strand Theatre is honoring the memories and community contributions of Peter J. and Georgia A. Manos with the installation of a bronze plaque outside the cinema’s Main Theater.

The plaque was graciously donated by David L. Pemberton Sr. and his wife, MaryAnn, who were friends with Peter and Georgia Manos throughout their lives. All shared a love of watching movies at the Strand, 28 E. Winter St. Mr. Pemberton graduated from The Ohio State University College of Law and was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1966.

Also a lawyer, Peter Manos was born January 17, 1922, in Lynn, Massachusetts. Before he attended school, he served as a Lieutenant Junior Grade in the U.S. Navy stationed in Guam during World War II. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1947, and then attended Brown University, Harvard Graduate School of Business, and Capital University, where he earned his law degree. In 1951, he met and married Georgia Vatsures and established his law iconic firm – today known as Manos, Martin, and Pergram. Mr. Manos was very active in the community. He was the founding president of Kiwanis Club of Delaware, established the Delaware County Foundation, worked with United Way, Red Cross, and Delaware Speech and Hearing, and was an associate of Ohio Wesleyan and the Delaware County Cultural Arts Center (the Arts Castle).

Georgia Manos was born October 12, 1923, in Delaware, Ohio. She graduated from Willis High School and attended The Ohio State University. Mrs. Manos worked at Bun’s, Nectar Candyland, Lazarus, and Manos Law Office. She was also very active in community service, cofounding the Delaware County Foundation with her husband. She volunteered at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Grady Memorial Hospital, United Way, and Red Cross. In addition, she was an OSU Hospitals Service Board Charter and Lifetime member.

Philanthropy runs in the Manos family. Daughter Joni Manos Brown, former Strand Board president, and her family recently sponsored renaming of the Strand’s Balcony Theater to the Brown Family Generations Theater. The new name is a dedication to all of the children who have taken part in the Strand’s Free Summer Kid’s Series, giving back to the community.

The Strand is owned and operated by the Strand Theatre and Cultural Arts Association with a mission that includes working “to foster the public’s appreciation of films & historic movie theaters as part of the American culture.” As a nonprofit, the Strand relies on community and donor support, grants and sponsorships, and governmental support to fund improvements made to the theatre. Improvements to all three theaters as well as the renovation of restrooms, marquee repair, a new building façade, and HVAC and boiler units are examples of repairs made in recent years.

“The Strand is very fortunate to have the support of the community, its membership and its donors to make the Strand still relevant after 100 years,” Managing Director Tracey Peyton said. “This support is the lifeblood, legacy and future of the theatre standing on the foundation provided by Peter and Georgia Manos.”

The iconic, nonprofit Strand Theatre will celebrate its 102nd year in operation in 2018. It is one of the 10 longest-operating theatres in the United States and one of the few remaining independent theatres showing first-run films. Estimated to have an economic impact of $1 million annually, the Strand serves 75,000 patrons per year and is open 364 days a year. Learn more at www.thestrandtheatre.net.

FILE – In a Sept. 22, 2016 file photo, musician Paul Simon performs during the Global Citizen Festival, in New York. Simon wraps up his farewell concert tour Saturday, Sept. 22, 2018 at a park in Queens, a bicycle ride across the borough from where he grew up. The 76-year-old singer picked Flushing Meadows Corona Park to say goodbye, an outdoor show on the first night of autumn. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121422543-31d8beb4690d47ffaf26f75e17772ee8.jpgFILE – In a Sept. 22, 2016 file photo, musician Paul Simon performs during the Global Citizen Festival, in New York. Simon wraps up his farewell concert tour Saturday, Sept. 22, 2018 at a park in Queens, a bicycle ride across the borough from where he grew up. The 76-year-old singer picked Flushing Meadows Corona Park to say goodbye, an outdoor show on the first night of autumn. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)
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