Haunted house in Orlando


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In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the character Barb appears in grand, gory style in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the character Barb appears in grand, gory style in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)


In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the Beyers' home living room from the TV show Stranger Thing is recreated in this haunted house for Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)


In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, a monstrous Demogorgon seemingly around every corner is ready to scare you in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)


No live Barb, many Demogorgons at Universal haunted house

By MIKE SCHNEIDER

Associated Press

Wednesday, October 10

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — There may be no “Justice for Barb” at Universal Orlando’s haunted house based on the Netflix hit, “Stranger Things,” but the beloved, ill-fated character does appear in grand, gory style.

The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights, the most haunted houses ever in 28 years of celebrating all things horror at the Orlando theme park resort. “Stranger Things” haunted houses also are at Halloween Horror Nights celebrations at Universal parks in Hollywood and Singapore, running from mid-September to the beginning of November.

Patrons walking through the “Stranger Things” haunted house follow the plot contours of the first season. There’s the shed where Will disappears, the Byers home where letters on the walls and Christmas lights help Joyce communicate with her missing son, the hellish Upside Down world, the lab where the malfeasance begins and even Eleven’s frozen waffles. Oh yeah, there’s a monstrous Demogorgon seemingly around every corner, ready to scare the bejesus out of you.

“Boom, a Demogorgon pops out and tries to get you. But he misses you so he tries to get you again over here,” said Patrick Braillard, creative development show director at Universal Orlando, walking recently through the haunted house — which is really a maze of rooms in a back-lot studio at the theme park resort.

Tongue firmly in check, he added, “There’s just one Demogorgon hunting you.”

Actually, there are multiple performers playing the looming monster at any given time in the house. Adult, female performers play the four Bar Mitzvah-aged-boy leads. Other performers play Nancy, Steve, Sheriff Hopper and Joyce. Different characters populate the house at different times of the night so patrons walking through it get different experiences.

Netflix and the show’s vendors worked with Universal to make sure the bed sheets and the wallpaper in the Byers house was the same as in the TV show.

And, of course, there’s Barb. Unfortunately for fans, Barb’s fate in the haunted house is no different than in the TV show.

“Hashtag, ‘Justice for Barb,’” Braillard said.

Follow Mike Schneider on Twitter at https://twitter.com/MikeSchneiderAP

The Conversation

Why is it fun to be frightened?

October 12, 2018

Visiting an extreme haunted house can be delightfully terrifying.

Author

Margee Kerr

Adjunct Professor of Sociology, University of Pittsburgh

Disclosure statement

Margee Kerr does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners

University of Pittsburgh provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

A new installment of the ‘Halloween’ franchise brings the action forward to 2018.

John Carpenter’s iconic horror film “Halloween” celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. Few horror movies have achieved similar notoriety, and it’s credited with kicking off the steady stream of slasher flicks that followed.

Audiences flocked to theaters to witness the seemingly random murder and mayhem a masked man brought to a small suburban town, reminding them that picket fences and manicured lawns cannot protect us from the unjust, the unknown or the uncertainty that awaits us all in both life and death. The film offers no justice for the victims in the end, no rebalancing of good and evil.

Why, then, would anyone want to spend their time and money to watch such macabre scenes filled with depressing reminders of just how unfair and scary our world can be?

I’ve spent the past 10 years investigating just this question, finding the typical answer of “Because I like it! It’s fun!” incredibly unsatisfying. I’ve long been convinced there’s more to it than the “natural high” or adrenaline rush many describe – and indeed, the body does kick into “go” mode when you’re startled or scared, amping up not only adrenaline but a multitude of chemicals that ensure your body is fueled and ready to respond. This “fight or flight” response to threat has helped keep humans alive for millennia.

That still doesn’t explain why people would want to intentionally scare themselves, though. As a sociologist, I’ve kept asking “But, why?” After two years collecting data in a haunted attraction with my colleague Greg Siegle, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Pittsburgh, we’ve found the gains from thrills and chills can go further than the natural high.

Studying fear at a terrifying attraction

To capture in real time what makes fear fun, what motivates people to pay to be scared out of their skin and what they experience when engaging with this material, we needed to gather data in the field. In this case, that meant setting up a mobile lab in the basement of an extreme haunted attraction outside Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

This adults-only extreme attraction went beyond the typical startling lights and sounds and animated characters found in a family-friendly haunted house. Over the course of about 35 minutes, visitors experienced a series of intense scenarios where, in addition to unsettling characters and special effects, they were touched by the actors, restrained and exposed to electricity. It was not for the faint of heart.

For our study, we recruited 262 guests who had already purchased tickets. Before they entered the attraction, each completed a survey about their expectations and how they were feeling. We had them answer questions again about how they were feeling once they had gone through the attraction.

We also used mobile EEG technology to compare 100 participants’ brainwave activity as they sat through 15 minutes of various cognitive and emotional tasks before and after the attraction.

Guests reported significantly higher mood, and felt less anxious and tired, directly after their trip through the haunted attraction. The more terrifying the better: Feeling happy afterward was related to rating the experience as highly intense and scary. This set of volunteers also reported feeling that they’d challenged their personal fears and learned about themselves.

Analysis of the EEG data revealed widespread decreases in brain reactivity from before to after among those whose mood improved. In other words, highly intense and scary activities – at least in a controlled environment like this haunted attraction – may “shut down” the brain to an extent, and that in turn is associated with feeling better. Studies of those who practice mindfulness meditation have made a similar observation.

Coming out stronger on the other side

Together our findings suggest that going through an extreme haunted attraction provides gains similar to choosing to run a 5K race or tackling a difficult climbing wall. There’s a sense of uncertainty, physical exertion, a challenge to push yourself – and eventually achievement when it’s over and done with.

Fun-scary experiences could serve as an in-the-moment recalibration of what registers as stressful and even provide a kind of confidence boost. After watching a scary movie or going through a haunted attraction, maybe everything else seems like no big deal in comparison. You rationally understand that the actors in a haunted house aren’t real, but when you suspend your disbelief and allow yourself to become immersed in the experience, the fear certainly can feel real, as does the satisfaction and sense of accomplishment when you make it through. As I experienced myself after all kinds of scary adventures in Japan, Colombia and all over the U.S., confronting a horde of zombies can actually make you feel pretty invincible.

Movies like “Halloween” allow people to tackle the big, existential fears we all have, like why bad things happen without reason, through the protective frame of entertainment. Choosing to do fun, scary activities may also serve as a way to practice being scared, building greater self-knowledge and resilience, similar to rough-and-tumble play. It’s an opportunity to engage with fear on your own terms, in environments where you can push your boundaries, safely. Because you’re not in real danger, and thus not occupied with survival, you can choose to observe your reactions and how your body changes, gaining greater insight to yourself.

What it takes to be safely scared

While there are countless differences in the nature, content, intensity and overall quality of haunted attractions, horror movies and other forms of scary entertainment, they all share a few critical components that help pave the way for a fun scary time.

First and foremost, you have to make the choice to engage – don’t drag your best friend with you unless she is also on board. But do try to gather some friends when you’re ready. When you engage in activities with other people, even just watching a movie, your own emotional experience is intensified. Doing intense, exciting and thrilling things together can make them more fun and help create rewarding social bonds. Emotions can be contagious, so when you see your friend scream and laugh, you may feel compelled to do the same.

No matter the potential benefits, horror movies and scary entertainment are not for everyone, and that’s OK. While the fight-or-flight response is universal, there are important differences between individuals – for example, in genetic expressions, environment and personal history – that help explain why some loathe and others love thrills and chills.

Regardless of your taste (or distaste) for all things horror or thrill-related, an adventurous and curious mindset can benefit everyone. After all, we’re the descendants of those who were adventurous and curious enough to explore the new and novel, but also quick and smart enough to run or fight when danger appeared. This Halloween, maybe challenge yourself to at least one fun scary experience and prepare to unleash your inner superhero.

2 Comments

Joe Dirk

I used to love a good scare. Haunted houses and such just don’t do it for me anymore. I have camped in wilderness areas next to creepy old cemeteries in “banjo” counties, but that doesn’t even make me nervous these days. I still enjoy watching the movies, going to haunted attractions, and camping out in creepy places but it just isn’t the same as when I was younger. I can no longer suspend my beliefs. My enjoyment has been reduced to appreciating the technical work and the costumes.

Chris Crawford

Do you think that there’s a connection between the disjunctive experience of a joke and the disjunctive experience of a scary movie? In each case we are presented with experiences that lead us to an expectation, which is then shattered by the punchline or the failure of the experience to harm us. For that matter, is the work of M.C.Escher similar in its disjunctive effect? Our visual systems are led to a conclusion that is contradicted by the image. Again, is this disjunction the heart of the experience?

You might profit from reading Huizinga’s “Homo Ludens”, about the nature of play in human society. He discusses the role of safety in play. And of course, video games do much the same thing, placing the player in dangerous situations from which he can extricate himself.

Lastly, Mr. Dirk’s comment raises an important point: there appears to be an age-related factor at work with scary movies and with games. As an old fogey, I no longer take pleasure in scary movies, and games no longer hold my interest as they once did. Is the power of disjunction lost on those who have experienced the disjunction so many times that it has lost any disjunctive effect?

QUEEN TO RELEASE BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

ORIGINAL FILM SOUNDTRACK ON OCTOBER 19

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY, THE FILM,

RELEASES WORLD-WIDE NOVEMBER 2

THE 22-SONG ALBUM FEATURES PREVIOUSLY UNAVAILABLE QUEEN PERFORMANCES AT LIVE AID PLUS NEW VERSIONS OF QUEEN CLASSICS

SMILE REUNITES TO RE-RECORD SONG FOR SOUNDTRACK

Available on Virgin Universal /Hollywood Records (USA)

(September 5, 2018) For the first time ever audio tracks from Queen’s legendary performance at Live Aid are being released as part of the soundtrack album to Bohemian Rhapsody, 20th Century Fox and Regency Enterprises’ forthcoming feature film celebrating the band, their music and their extraordinary lead singer Freddie Mercury. Recorded at the historic Wembley concert in July 1985, these Live Aid songs are among the rare gems and unheard versions from the band’s rich catalogue.

Alongside the show-stopping Live Aid performances of “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Radio Ga Ga,” “Hammer To Fall” and “We Are The Champions,” the album features other rare live tracks spanning Queen’s entire career, new versions of old favorites, and a choice selection of the band’s finest studio recordings. Among them are some of Queen’s biggest hits, including eleven all-time greatest anthems that reached No. 1 around the world. The track listing was announced today, September 5, 2018, which would have been Freddie’s 72nd birthday.

Bohemian Rhapsody will have its world premiere in the UK on October 23 before opening across the globe in early November. It stars Rami Malek as Freddie, Gwilym Lee as Brian May, Ben Hardy as Roger Taylor, Joe Mazzello as John Deacon, and Lucy Boynton as Freddie’s lifelong companion Mary Austin. The soundtrack, featuring all-original Queen recordings and vocals, will be released on CD and digital formats on October 19.

The 22 songs on the soundtrack were produced by Brian May and Roger Taylor, with engineering and co-production by long-time Queen studio collaborators Justin Shirley-Smith, Kris Fredriksson and Joshua J Macrae, and mastering by Adam Ayan and Bob Ludwig.

The key task for the team behind the Bohemian Rhapsody soundtrack was sourcing the most suitable versions of the band’s songs, especially live performances, to fit the screenplay’s career-spanning narrative. Their brief was not merely to produce a greatest hits playlist package but a soundtrack album to stand on its own merits, underscoring key moments in the screenplay. May, Taylor, and their co-producers worked with the filmmakers to find the best versions of each track to heighten the dramatic power of each scene.

Ensuring that listeners are in no doubt they are listening to a soundtrack album, Brian came up with the inspired idea that Queen should record their own arrangement of the famous 20th Century Fox Fanfare. Featuring May’s famous multi-layered guitars and Roger Taylor’s distinctive percussion, this revamped track provides a suitably flamboyant opening fanfare to both film and album.

The five tracks from Queen’s 21-minute performance at Live Aid on July 13, 1985, have never been released in audio form before. They’ve only ever been featured on video as a special extra on the DVD/BluRay release of Queen Rock Montreal, which features the Montreal Forum shows of November 1981. The Live Aid audio is exclusive to this new soundtrack album.

Other tracks on the soundtrack have been sourced from different decades and even different continents. “Fat Bottomed Girls” comes from the 1979 Paris shows, part of the Jazz world tour, and has never been released before. “Now I’m Here” was recorded at the band’s 1975 Christmas Eve show at London’s Hammersmith Odeon. And the history making duet between Freddie and Brian on “Love of My Life” comes from the Rock in Rio festival of January 1985 when 300,000 Brazilians sang along. Previously this track was only available to fans on the video releases of this performance.

The three remaining songs on the soundtrack will be fresh to Queen fans, old and new. “We Will Rock You” starts out as the studio version, then seamlessly blends into a live performance with audience participation. This has been created especially for the film. “Don’t Stop Me Now” features Brian’s newly recorded guitar parts and is much closer to how the band plays the track live today.

“Doing All Right” was originally recorded by Smile, the predecessor band to Queen that featured Brian and Roger with vocalist Tim Staffell. When Tim later left, Roger and Brian would join forces with Freddie to form Queen. Freddie’s interpretation of the song is featured on the first Queen album. To recreate the original Smile version, Brian and Roger reunited with Staffell at Abbey Road Studios to re-record “Doing All Right” for the Bohemian Rhapsody soundtrack. This session which featured Roger, Tim and Brian all singing lead vocals took place almost 50 years after the original Smile recording.

With record sales estimated at 300 million and counting, Queen remain evergreen rock favorites whose glorious catalogue of songs continues to thrill fans of all ages across the globe. Despite the loss of Freddie in 1991, their following has continued to grow over the decades, boosted by a new wave of fans who first discovered the band’s music through their hugely successful stage show We Will Rock You or via hit TV shows like Glee, American Idol and The X-Factor.

The Bohemian Rhapsody film and its original soundtrack album are certain to introduce Queen to a new generation of listeners, and remind existing fans just how magnificent the band was in its prime. Queen remain spectacular performers today, both live and in the studio, their songs having comfortably stood the test of time. After almost 50 years together, Queen remain one of the most exciting and beloved bands in rock history.

Full track listing for Bohemian Rhapsody the original soundtrack is:

1. 20th Century Fox Theme 0:25

2. Somebody To Love 4:56

3. Doing All Right… revisited (Performed by Smile) 3:17

4. Keep Yourself Alive (Live At The Rainbow) 3:56

5. Killer Queen 2:59

6. Fat Bottomed Girls (Live In Paris) 4:38

7. Bohemian Rhapsody 5:55

8. Now I’m Here (Live At Hammersmith Odeon) 4:26

9. Crazy Little Thing Called Love 2:43

10. Love Of My Life (Rock In Rio) 4:29

11. We Will Rock You (Movie Mix) 2:09

12. Another One Bites The Dust 3:35

13. I Want To Break Free 3:43

14. Under Pressure (Performed by Queen & David Bowie) 4:04

15. Who Wants To Live Forever 5:15

16. Bohemian Rhapsody (Live Aid) 2:28

17. Radio Ga Ga (Live Aid) 4:06

18. Ay-Oh (Live Aid) 0:41

19. Hammer To Fall (Live Aid) 4:04

20. We Are The Champions (Live Aid) 3:57

21. Don’t Stop Me Now… revisited 3:38

22. The Show Must Go On 4:32

About Bohemian Rhapsody The Film:

Bohemian Rhapsody is a foot-stomping celebration of Queen, their music and their extraordinary lead singer Freddie Mercury. Freddie defied stereotypes and shattered convention to become one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. The film traces the meteoric rise of the band through their iconic songs and revolutionary sound.

Twentieth Century Fox and Regency Enterprises present a GK Films production “Bohemian Rhapsody”. Starring Rami Malek, Lucy Boynton, Gwilym Lee, Ben Hardy, Joe Mazzello, Aidan Gillen, Tom Hollander and Mike Myers. Executive Music Producers Brian May, Roger Taylor. Music Supervisor Becky Bentham. Co-Producer Richard Hewitt. Edited by John Ottman, ACE. Production Designer Aaron Haye. Director of Photography Newton Thomas Sigel, ASC. Executive Producers Arnon Milchan, Denis O’Sullivan, Justin Haythe, Dexter Fletcher, Jane Rosenthal. Produced by Graham King, Jim Beach. Story by Anthony McCarten and Peter Morgan. Screenplay by Anthony McCarten. Directed by Bryan Singer.

OZY Media Announces New Primetime Television Series, ‘Take on America’

Groundbreaking Town Hall Events Tackling America’s Most Pressing Issues Through the Lens of Race

Celebrity Guests Include Jemele Hill, Lawrence Gilliard Jr., Olivia Munn, Vanessa Carlton, Mayor Carmen Cruz, Elizabeth Vargas, Eddie Huang, Michelle Kwan, Harry Shum Jr, and MANY more.

Series premieres Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 8PM ET/ 7PM CT on PBS Stations, Facebook, YouTube, and OZY.com

Mountain View, CA – October 12, 2018 – OZY Media, the daily information source for important stories told nowhere else, today announced their fourth primetime television show, Take On America, a groundbreaking series of televised town halls confronting the country’s most pressing issues through the lens of race. The series premieres on Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 8PM ET/ 7PM CT on PBS Stations, Facebook, YouTube and OZY.com.

There will also be a special Take On America podcast, with editorial highlights and commentary from each episode available in iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts.

Hosted by Emmy-award winning journalist and OZY co-founder and CEO Carlos Watson, Take On America will uncover the different perspectives among groups who are often stereotyped for voting as a bloc, and reveal surprising views and diverse values.

Featuring a panel of celebrities and political leaders, each town hall will tackle critical political and cultural questions in front of a live studio audience comprised of one hundred people of each featured demographic group. The first four episodes will feature the voices of:

  • Black Men in Baltimore (Airing October 18, 2018)
  • White Women in Nashville (Airing October 25, 2018)
  • Latino Families in New York City (Airing November 1, 2018)
  • Asian-American Millennials in San Francisco (Airing November 8, 2018)

Each episode will provide an inside look into the daily conversations these communities are really having, helping to forge paths for progressive dialogue and forward movement as one nation in the lead-up to the midterms and beyond. The series aims to foster dialogue that unites American people, and fosters a greater insight and understanding at a critical time.

“I feel passionately that we are at a pivotal moment in our nation’s history,” said series host Carlos Watson. “We are living in one of the most racially charged eras since the Civil Rights Movement, and the world is simultaneously more connected technologically, and disconnected interpersonally, than it’s ever been before. We hope that Take on America will create a forum for substantive dialogue and ultimately inform and inspire action.”

The announcement of OZY’s fourth primetime television show, Take On America comes on the heels of a number of recent major announcements for the company. In August, OZY announced the creation of an in-house production studio, OZY Studios, doubling the size of their video team in order to drive the company’s rapid growth in TV and digital video series. OZY also recently signed with premiere Hollywood talent agency, United Talent Agency (UTA) to accelerate the company’s growth in television, podcasts, and live events.

Take On America is supported by the Charles Koch Foundation and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.

“Conversations that surface our differences take courage,” said Charles Koch Foundation director of free expression Sarah Ruger. “We’re proud to support OZY’s national townhall series as it invites communities to join the forward-looking dialogue that’s built on respect for each other’s dignity, instead of divisiveness.” The Foundation supports partners who are working to understand the roots of intolerance and finding creative ways to increase engagement across divides in areas such as criminal justice reform, free expression, foreign policy, economic opportunity and innovation.

About OZY Media

With 40 million monthly unique users and 4 million subscribers, OZY brings readers “the new and the next,” offering 100 percent original content with a focus on the future, via unique OZY News, OZY Magazine, OZY TV and OZY Events products. Called “the new media magnet for the news hungry” by Fortune magazine, OZY’s in-depth and high-quality journalism has attracted a number of high-profile media partners including The New York Times, NPR, PBS NewsHour, TED, The Financial Times, The Huffington Post and many more, as well as guest editors including Bill Gates, President Bill Clinton and Prime Minister Tony Blair.

Founded in 2013 by Emmy Award–winning journalist Carlos Watson and co-founder Samir Rao, the OZY team is based in Mountain View, California, and backed by leading Silicon Valley investors including Laurene Powell Jobs, Ron Conway, David Drummond, Larry Sonsini and Dan Rosensweig and a significant investment from publishing giant Axel Springer.

THE LINCOLN THEATRE’S “COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS” SERIES EXPLORES “RENAISSANCE MAGIC” NOVEMBER 1

The Harlem Renaissance was an intellectual, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, from approximately 1918 until the mid-1930s. Also known as the “New Negro Movement” at the time, this glorious rebirth of the African-American arts cast a cultural spell over the nation and the world. Two Columbus natives—jazz drummer Carl “Battleaxe” Kenny and jazz trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison—walked both the “Million Dollar Block” of Columbus’ Long Street and the heart of Harlem along Manhattan’s Lenox Avenue during this unprecedented groundswell of African-American artistic expression.

Facilitated by a local panel of speakers, this Community Conversations event will explore the “Renaissance Magic” experienced by these two native sons. The panel will include cultural historian Dr. Jack Marchbanks; Gamal Brown, owner of Onyx Dance Columbus; Michael Smith, Lecturer, Jazz Studies, The Ohio State University; Nannette Macijunes, Executive Director, Columbus Museum of Art; and Lincoln Theatre General Manager Suzan Bradford.

As part of Columbus’ “Harlem Renaissance 100—I, Too, Sing America” celebration, “Renaissance Magic” will be held at the Lincoln Theatre Cardinal Health Ballroom (769 E. Long St.) on Thursday, November 1. Doors open at 5:30pm. The program will begin at 6pm. Admission is free.

This program is made possible through the generous support of Donna and Larry James.

After the program, attendees are invited to the Lincoln Theatre’s main auditorium for a 20-minute sneak peek of the Lincoln Theatre Association’s upcoming, original musical theatre production, Renaissance MAGIC! Optional donations for the Lincoln Theatre Association will be collected at the preview performance.

The Lincoln Theatre Association presents RENAISSANCE MAGIC!

Saturday, November 3, 3 pm & 8 pm

Sunday, November 4, 3 pm

Lincoln Theatre (769 E. Long St.)

This original, locally produced work of musical theatre is set to the music of the intellectual, social, and artistic explosion of the early 1900s known as the Harlem Renaissance. Showcasing an all-local cast and creative team, this enchanting time-travel retrospective follows a family of performing artists living in the heyday of the Harlem Renaissance, and the youngest member who struggles to find her footing in the burgeoning arts scene because of her love of science and math. Tickets are $25, $30, and $50 (VIP) at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. VIP ticket includes admission to a pre-show parade and reception featuring cast members in era-appropriate costumes beginning one hour prior to each performance on Saturday, November 3, only.

www.LincolnTheatreColumbus.com

CALENDAR LISTING

The Lincoln Theatre Community Conversations Series presents RENAISSANCE MAGIC

Thursday, November 1, 6 pm

Lincoln Theatre Cardinal Health Ballroom (769 E. Long St.)

Two Columbus natives—jazz drummer Carl “Battleaxe” Kenny and jazz trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison—walked both the “Million Dollar Block” of Columbus’ Long Street and the heart of Harlem along Manhattan’s Lenox Avenue during this unprecedented groundswell of African-American artistic expression. Facilitated by a local panel of speakers, this event will explore the “Renaissance Magic” experienced by these two native sons. Doors open at 5:30pm. The event begins at 6pm. Admission is free. www.LincolnTheatreColumbus.com

Support for the Lincoln Theatre’s 2018-19 season is provided in part by the Greater Columbus Arts Council, the City of Columbus, Franklin County, Nationwide, and the Ohio Arts Council to encourage economic growth, educational excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans.

About the Lincoln Theatre

First opened in 1928, the Lincoln Theatre is a landmark in African-American and jazz history. After undergoing a $13.5 million renovation funded by a partnership of public and private support, the Lincoln reopened in May 2009 as a multi-use, state-of-the-art performing arts and education center serving the diversity of the central Ohio community. The Lincoln is a bustling hub of activity 365 days a year hosting performances, rehearsals, and classes in the performing arts, as well as a wide variety of community events such as film festivals, meetings, and receptions.

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the character Barb appears in grand, gory style in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/10/web1_121540749-249f0f4321bf47a19143c98b5e424553.jpgIn this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the character Barb appears in grand, gory style in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the Beyers’ home living room from the TV show Stranger Thing is recreated in this haunted house for Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/10/web1_121540749-96ee71b2c4d5415397571f00ec2ad37c.jpgIn this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, the Beyers’ home living room from the TV show Stranger Thing is recreated in this haunted house for Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, a monstrous Demogorgon seemingly around every corner is ready to scare you in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/10/web1_121540749-af503acdd6de4f7cb843bc5959ff4a0a.jpgIn this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 photo, a monstrous Demogorgon seemingly around every corner is ready to scare you in the Stranger Things haunted house during Halloween Horror nights at Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. The “Stranger Things” house is one of 10 haunted houses built for this year’s Halloween Horror Nights running through early November. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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