Terror at Tree of Life


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Rabbi Jeffrey Myers, right, of Tree of Life/Or L'Simcha Congregation hugs Rabbi Cheryl Klein, left, of Dor Hadash Congregation and Rabbi Jonathan Perlman during a community gathering held in the aftermath of a deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Rabbi Jeffrey Myers, right, of Tree of Life/Or L'Simcha Congregation hugs Rabbi Cheryl Klein, left, of Dor Hadash Congregation and Rabbi Jonathan Perlman during a community gathering held in the aftermath of a deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)


Rabbi Jeffrey Myers of the Tree of Life/Or L'Simcha Congregation stands across the street from the synagogue in Pittsburgh, Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Tree of Life shooting suspect Robert Gregory Bowers is expected to appear in federal court Monday. Authorities say he expressed hatred toward Jews during the rampage Saturday morning and in later comments to police. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)


Rabbi Jeffrey Myers of the Tree of Life/Or L'Simcha Congregation stands across the street from the synagogue in Pittsburgh, Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Tree of Life shooting suspect Robert Gregory Bowers is expected to appear in federal court Monday. Authorities say he expressed hatred toward Jews during the rampage Saturday and in later comments to police. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)


‘I’m going to die’: Survivors relive horrors at Tree of Life

By ADAM GELLER, ALLEN G. BREED and MARYCLAIRE DALE

Associated Press

Tuesday, October 30

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Up in the choir loft, alone, Rabbi Jeffrey Myers whispered to a 911 dispatcher on his cellphone.

Below him, down in the sanctuary, eight of his congregants had been felled by a gunman’s bullets. Up here, though, Myers couldn’t see them — or any of the other horrors going on beyond his hideaway. He could only listen. He waited for another round of semiautomatic gunfire, but all was silent. Then he heard what he feared even more.

Could that be footsteps?

Myers rushed into the loft’s bathroom, barricading himself inside.

Days earlier he had used a blog posting to urge members of his Tree of Life congregation to celebrate life’s moments while they had the chance: “None of us can say with certainty that there is always next year,” he wrote. Now, Myers wondered if he should hang up with 911 and make a video to tell his wife and children he loved them — while he still had time.

“I’m going to die,” he thought.

Saturday morning — the time when Jews in communities like this one come together to celebrate the miracle of the earth’s creation and the day of rest that followed — had barely begun.

As a light rain fell over the Tudors and Victorians of Pittsburgh’s leafy Squirrel Hill, the parking lot at the Tree of Life Synagogue had been slow to fill in. There was nothing unusual about that. Officially, services begin at 9:45 for Tree of Life and the two other congregations that share its large stone building — New Light and Dor Hadash. Worshippers from all three were filtering in, many of them older, taking their time.

The synagogue has long been one of the touchstones of Squirrel Hill, a rolling neighborhood about five miles east of downtown that is the center of the city’s large Jewish community. Founded in 1864, Tree of Life prides itself as a warm, welcoming place, “where even the oldest Jewish traditions become relevant to the way our members live today,” it says on its website.

On Saturdays, the day of the Jewish Sabbath, its doors are unlocked and open to all. On this day, the New Light congregation gathered in a basement room. Upstairs, toward the front of the building, the worshippers of Dor Hadash prepared for a ceremony to name a newborn boy. And in the main sanctuary, Myers convened about a dozen of his congregants.

Outside the building, though, Robert Gregory Bowers was also mindful of the Saturday rituals. For months, the 46-year-old truck driver had been posting angry rants against Jews on the Gab social media site, to little apparent notice. He blamed Jews for plotting against society, contaminating it in order to destroy it.

At 9:49 a.m. Saturday, he posted again.

“I can’t sit by and watch my people get slaughtered,” Bowers wrote. “Screw your optics. I’m going in.”

Inside the synagogue, New Light’s rabbi, Jonathan Perlman, was just a few minutes into morning prayers when his congregants heard a loud bang. Barry Werber, an Air Force vet who was there to help mark the anniversary of his mother’s death, thought at first that someone might have walked into a cart upstairs stacked with glassware and whiskey meant for the baby-naming ceremony. To Myers, it sounded like somebody in the hallway had knocked over a coat rack.

Then the sounds came again, this time in a burst.

Werber and other worshippers opened a door leading into the basement hallway. A body lay on the staircase. Their rabbi quickly closed the door and pushed Werber and fellow congregants Melvin Wax and Carol Black into a large supply closet. As gunshots echoed upstairs, Werber dialed 911 but was too afraid to say anything, for fear of making any noise.

The first call to an emergency dispatcher came in at 9:54: Active shooter at Tree of Life. Twenty shots fired in the lobby, maybe 30.

Nine minutes had passed since worship was scheduled to begin.

In the main sanctuary, Myers told his congregants to drop to the floor. “Don’t move. Be quiet.”

Although he was their leader, Myers was still new to Tree of Life. A native of Newark, New Jersey, he had been trained as a cantor — the clergyman charged with leading Jewish congregations in song. For years, he worked in the New York area, then near Atlantic City. But watching some synagogues close and others consolidate, he decided to broaden his resume and sought ordination.

When his previous congregation eliminated the cantor’s post because of budgetary pressures, Myers found his first job as a rabbi in a city he knew little about. He and his wife, Janice, had moved to Pittsburgh a year earlier to start a new and somewhat unlikely chapter for a couple whose two children were already grown.

Now, still near the front of the sanctuary, he led a group of worshippers through some nearby doors that he knew would get them outside, to safety.

Then he turned back. Eight congregants remained inside, near the back of the room closest to the lobby — where the gunfire was getting louder.

“I knew at that point there was nothing I could do,” Myers would say later.

From the front of the sanctuary, Myers scrambled up the narrow stairs leading to the choir loft.

Unseen to him, the stocky, square-jawed Bowers stalked the building, armed with an AR-15 assault-style rifle and three handguns.

In an upstairs bathroom, custodian Augie Siriano heard four or five distinctive pops and went to investigate, threading through a sanctuary and lobby toward the chapel where Tree of Life’s service had been cut short.

“I turned and looked and there was a gentleman lying face down, coming out of the doors of the chapel, and he had blood coming out of his head,” Siriano said in an interview with Pittsburgh television station WTAE. “As soon as I seen that, I turned and headed in the other direction, toward the exit doors.”

In the pitch black of the basement closet, all turned silent. Could it be over? Werber and the others hidden there waited, before the elderly Wax decided to check and opened the door. A blast of bullets drove him backward, and those inside the closet watched their friend fall to the floor. The gunman, stepping over his body, moved toward them.

In the darkness, Werber held his breath. He still had the 911 operator on the line. But his old flip phone had no light on it, and he and the others were drawn deep in the shadows.

They could see, framed in a sliver of light from the doorway, the stock of Bower’s rifle and his jacket, but little else. Could he see them? As the seconds ticked by, Werber waited for the gunman to spray the closet with bullets. “I’m barely breathing,” Werber would later recall. Then Bowers turned his back and walked away.

Outside, police cruisers and tactical vehicles flooded into the blocks around the intersection of Shady and Wilkins avenues. Nearby, Michael Aronson, a long-ago paramedic turned accounts manager, ordered his daughters, ages 6 and 8, into the basement, asking them to remember what they’d learned in school lockdown drills. He flipped through channels on his police scanner, as chatter ramped up in intensity.

“We’re under fire,” an officer radioed in at 9:59 a.m.

“Every unit in the city needs to get here now!” another officer said minutes later.

Judah Samet, a member of the Tree of Life congregation for 54 years, is almost always on time for services, but his housekeeper had delayed him. The 80-year-old, who survived the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, was just pulling into a handicapped spot when a man knocked on the window: “You can’t go into the synagogue. There’s a shooting.”

Samet saw what he later realized was a plainclothes officer, pistol drawn, exchanging fire with an assailant. For the second time in his life, Samet was face-to-face with evil.

Back inside, Werber and the others waited. The closet had a back door, Werber recalled, but in the darkness he could not see it. Perlman, the rabbi, managed to find his way out at some point. But the other two remained until police came to lead them out.

“I lost my yarmulke in the process,” Werber said. “I still had my prayer shawl.”

When police tactical teams entered the synagogue, a spent ammunition magazine lay in the hallway — and four bodies were sprawled across the atrium.

Bowers exchanged more gunfire, then retreated to the third floor. Four officers were wounded before authorities cornered the gunman.

At 11:08, Bowers, bleeding from wounds, crawled from his hiding place and raised his hands.

“All these Jews need to die,” he said to an officer.

In the end, 11 people did lose their lives at Tree of Life in the worst single act of violence against Jews in America since the country’s founding. The victims included Dor Hadash congregant Jerry Rabinowitz, who reportedly went in to try to help the wounded, as well as three members of New Light: Richard Gottfried, a dentist looking ahead to retirement; Dan Stein, a new grandfather; and Wax, a retired accountant who was a “gem and gentleman,” Werber said.

Seven of the eight Tree of Life congregants who couldn’t get out of the sanctuary also were slain, and one was wounded but lived. The killed include brothers Cecil and David Rosenthal, who are to be laid to rest Tuesday, and a couple, Bernice and Sylvan Simon, both in their 80s.

On Monday morning, Myers stood at a street corner outside of the synagogue, where memorials shaped like the Star of David had been placed along the sidewalk — one to honor each of those killed. He talked about the funerals to come and the difficult days and weeks ahead, but vowed: “Here in Pittsburgh, hate will not triumph. Love will win out.”

Then he pointed to the building named for the tree at the heart of the Old Testament’s Garden of Eden.

“I looked at this and I said, ‘Oh my God, this is a giant mausoleum,” he said. But then, he realized, he was wrong.

“Tree of Life has been in Pittsburgh for 154 years. We’re not leaving this corner,” he said. “We will be back and will rebuild, even stronger.”

Also contributing were AP reporters Mark Scolforo, Mark Gillispie and Claudia Lauer.

For AP’s complete coverage of the Pittsburgh synagogue shootings: https://apnews.com/Pittsburghsynagoguemassacre

CNN goes after Trump in wake of explosive devices

By DAVID BAUDER

AP Media Writer

Tuesday, October 30

NEW YORK (AP) — CNN’s management has taken an aggressive stance against attacks from President Donald Trump after the network was sent explosive devices from a man who allegedly targeted Trump’s perceived enemies.

In a statement, CNN chief executive Jeff Zucker was critical of the White House’s “complete lack of understanding about the seriousness” of its attacks against the media, and it was followed up by another statement this week calling on Press Secretary Sarah Sanders to understand that “words matter.”

The network has responded to specific provocations in the past. Yet it’s still considered unusual for a news organization, as opposed to an individual commentator or columnist, to take on a president. It’s the first time Zucker has done so this year.

Two of its former leaders applauded the approach on Tuesday.

“When it happens to you, it’s difficult to maintain a veneer of objectivity and restraint,” said Jonathan Klein, CNN president from 2004 to 2010. “It wouldn’t make sense for them not to respond in this way. The bomber had ‘CNN sucks’ stickers on his van and it’s clear who has been pushing that idea.”

Zucker’s statement was justifiable, and handling it any other way “would come off as false or a bit odd,” he said.

Zucker spoke on the day that Florida resident Cesar Sayoc allegedly sent the first of three devices to CNN offices. Another statement on Monday, issued through the network’s public relations Twitter feed, addressed Sanders in saying CNN did not suggest that Trump was responsible for the device sent to its office “by his ardent and emboldened supporter.

“We did say that he, and you, should understand that your words matter,” CNN said. “Every single one of them. But so far, you don’t seem to get that.”

The statement followed an exchange in Monday’s White House press briefing between Sanders and CNN’s Jim Acosta, who tried to get Sanders to say specifically who the president meant when he made comments about “fake news” and declared the media “the enemy of the people.” Sanders had said it was irresponsible of any news organization, like CNN, to blame the president for Sayoc’s actions.

“There are a lot of reasons to hold your fire. One of which is you hope people mature,” said Rick Kaplan, CNN’s president from 1997 to 2000. But at some point when you realize that nothing’s going to change, it can make you look wimpy not to respond, he said.

“They’ve been patient and professional,” Kaplan said. “I’m proud of Jeff.”

CNN, which declined comment on Tuesday, generally responds through its Twitter feed when it has specific points to make. In recent months, for example, CNN issued statements when Trump criticized CNN reporter Carl Bernstein and barred CNN reporter Kaitlan Collins from a White House event.

“Jeff has been pretty circumspect about his public statements,” Klein said. “They’ve been few and far between. I would expect that he would continue to keep his counsel and not make any further statements unless there were other extreme provocations.”

CNN’s best bet is to catch its breath and continue to cover the administration objectively, and “I have no doubt they will do that,” he said.

CNN’s coverage also contains plenty of on-air commentary — journalists like Jeff Greenfield have criticized the network for being too Trump-centric — and the commentary is most likely what has gotten on the president’s nerves.

Trump’s biggest supporter in the media, Fox News Channel’s Sean Hannity, has kept up a steady drumbeat of criticism of CNN. “CNN fake news president Jeff Zucker is lecturing the president on civility?” Hannity said on his show Monday night. He said that a weekend discussion between CNN’s Brian Stelter and Margaret Sullivan of the Washington Post about the impact of Hannity’s words is “crossing lines into slander.”

“If you call out lies, call fake news for what it is, if you point out a political agenda under the guise of so-called news, that is not a call for violence,” Hannity said. “It is a simple, fundamental truth the media doesn’t want to hear.”

CNN hasn’t officially taken on Fox News Channel, although some of its commentators and show hosts have. For Zucker to do so, like he has with the president, would not be wise, said both Kaplan and Klein.

“If you attack them back, you’re just getting down in the mud with them,” Kaplan said. “You should just hold your ground. It’s one thing to have an exchange of views with the president and another to do it with a group of would-be journalists.”

Meanwhile on Tuesday, Brian Kilmeade and Steve Doocy, hosts of Trump’s favorite morning show “Fox & Friends,” suggested the president should cool it with his criticisms of the press as enemies of the people.

“It doesn’t help anybody,” Kilmeade said. “Too many people get shrapnel with that statement.”

‘Rage’ against elite: Centrist leaders losing Europe’s favor

By GREGORY KATZ

Associated Press

Tuesday, October 30

LONDON (AP) — Angela Merkel’s decision to step down as party leader even as she tries to keep her position as German chancellor highlights a trend bedeviling Europe’s leaders: Centrist parties are fading as fringe parties gather pace.

Merkel — whose familiar face would be on a Mount Rushmore of contemporary European leaders if one were carved — succumbed to political reality after several poor showings in state elections that showed voters moving to alternative parties on either side of her center-right Christian Democrats.

In Italy, a coalition of anti-establishment, anti-immigrant parties is in power, and in France, newly elected pro-business, pro-European Union President Emmanuel Macron has seen his popularity plummet after the novelty of his 2017 election dissipated.

In Britain, Prime Minister Theresa May clings to power without a majority in Parliament. She is struggling to keep her Conservative Party behind her as she seeks a middle-of-the-road Brexit blueprint rejected by hard-liners who want a complete break with the EU even as a “people’s vote” movement by those who want to scrap Brexit altogether gains some force.

The idea of liberal democracy — for decades the cornerstone of the vaunted “European project” — seems under fire as increasingly authoritarian governments rule Hungary and Poland and make gains elsewhere.

Alice Billon-Galland, a policy fellow with the European Leadership Network in London, says voters in Europe are supporting not only far-right parties but smaller “anti-establishment” parties from the left as well, such as the Greens, who did well in German voting. That leaves Europe’s leaders in a compromised position ahead of vital European parliamentary elections next year.

“My concern is more about leadership, and the future of the European project,” she said. “At a time of rising populism throughout the EU, and just before key elections in 2019, what Europe needs more than anything else is a vision and a strong, united core leadership to deliver it.”

She concedes this is unlikely with Britain withdrawing and Germany’s policies in transition.

The atmosphere is completely different than it was two decades ago in the period that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union and the enlargement of the EU to include former Soviet satellites.

Triumphalism reigned, with the perhaps naive belief that the trappings of liberal democracy, including freedom of expression, freedom of movement and free-market capitalism, would carry the day for the foreseeable future.

That was before Europe was hit by a series of lethal extremist attacks, a large influx of migrants from Asia, Africa and the Middle East and several financial crises that badly shook faith in the euro, the common currency that had been seen by many as the cement that would bind Europe together in an “ever closer union.”

Dominique Moisi, a senior adviser with the Institut Montaigne research group in Paris, said the “spirit of the times” is going against centrist, rational, pro-European leaders, in part because of a “rage” against the elite that is deeply felt by many.

“The problem for all the European leaders is the European election for May of next year,” he said. “What will be the results? Will anti-European forces be the leaders? It’s possible.”

Voter turnout for the election of the European Parliament is traditionally low, which could give non-centrist parties that organize effectively a chance to make substantial gains.

That could mean populists gain footholds on important committees, giving them a substantial impact on policy, said Anand Menon, director of the UK In a Changing Europe group in London.

That not only has symbolic value — a strong showing in Europe-wide balloting can serve as a springboard to success in elections in home countries — but also would give new parties some policy clout, he said.

He cites the troubles facing Germany’s main center-left party, the Social Democrats, as an example of the problems plaguing centrist groups throughout Europe. The party’s traditional working class voters are “fleeing” toward to the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party, he said, while its bourgeois, intellectual followers are joining the ecology-minded Greens.

“I wouldn’t say the center is disappearing,” Menon said. “I would say the centrist parties are finding it hard to come up with a narrative or a message that appeals to a sufficient number of people.”

Rabbi Jeffrey Myers, right, of Tree of Life/Or L’Simcha Congregation hugs Rabbi Cheryl Klein, left, of Dor Hadash Congregation and Rabbi Jonathan Perlman during a community gathering held in the aftermath of a deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121678124-7857447a02c2446599d30dae9c562fa9.jpgRabbi Jeffrey Myers, right, of Tree of Life/Or L’Simcha Congregation hugs Rabbi Cheryl Klein, left, of Dor Hadash Congregation and Rabbi Jonathan Perlman during a community gathering held in the aftermath of a deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Rabbi Jeffrey Myers of the Tree of Life/Or L’Simcha Congregation stands across the street from the synagogue in Pittsburgh, Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Tree of Life shooting suspect Robert Gregory Bowers is expected to appear in federal court Monday. Authorities say he expressed hatred toward Jews during the rampage Saturday morning and in later comments to police. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121678124-75a8329be46349e1812e2c203b22913c.jpgRabbi Jeffrey Myers of the Tree of Life/Or L’Simcha Congregation stands across the street from the synagogue in Pittsburgh, Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Tree of Life shooting suspect Robert Gregory Bowers is expected to appear in federal court Monday. Authorities say he expressed hatred toward Jews during the rampage Saturday morning and in later comments to police. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Rabbi Jeffrey Myers of the Tree of Life/Or L’Simcha Congregation stands across the street from the synagogue in Pittsburgh, Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Tree of Life shooting suspect Robert Gregory Bowers is expected to appear in federal court Monday. Authorities say he expressed hatred toward Jews during the rampage Saturday and in later comments to police. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121678124-770f787e38fc49af82dc117c438da78c.jpgRabbi Jeffrey Myers of the Tree of Life/Or L’Simcha Congregation stands across the street from the synagogue in Pittsburgh, Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Tree of Life shooting suspect Robert Gregory Bowers is expected to appear in federal court Monday. Authorities say he expressed hatred toward Jews during the rampage Saturday and in later comments to police. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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