Astronaut, space photos in New Albany


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NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE PRESENTS “VIEW FROM ABOVE” WITH ASTRONAUT TERRY VIRTS AT THE MCCOY DECEMBER 14

National Geographic Live, National Geographic’s touring speaker series, will present “View from Above” with Terry Virts, a celebrated NASA astronaut and National Geographic author. Virts will share his unique stories and stunning photographs taken from a place many will never visit — space.

The McCoy Marquee Series presents National Geographic Live “View From Above” at the Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts (100 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., New Albany) on Friday, December 14, at 7 pm. Tickets are $31.50 at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

As a NASA astronaut, pilot of the space shuttle Endeavour and crew member on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft, Virts spent 200 consecutive days in space as commander of the International Space Station—one of the longest continuous space mission of any NASA astronaut.

More recently, Virts appeared in the 2016 IMAX film A Beautiful Planet, a breathtaking portrait of Earth from space that features stunning footage—much of it shot by Virts while aboard (and outside) the International Space Station—of our magnificent blue planet and humanity’s impact on it. His photography, which provides incredible aerial views of Earth and the vast space that surrounds it, is featured in a new National Geographic book, VIEW FROM ABOVE: An Astronaut Photographs the World, which is available wherever books are sold.

About National Geographic Live

National Geographic Live is the live events division of National Geographic. With a broad roster of talent including renowned photographers, scientists, authors, filmmakers and adventurers, National Geographic Live’s critically acclaimed programs have connected with audiences worldwide for over a century. Currently, National Geographic Live events are held in a variety of cities around the world, including, Seattle, Tampa, Los Angeles, Florence, and Calgary. In each of these cities, speakers share behind-the-scenes stories from the front lines of exploration onstage alongside stunning imagery and gripping footage.

For more information, visit natgeolive.com

CALENDAR LISTING

The McCoy Marquee Series presents NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE “VIEW FROM ABOVE” WITH ASTRONAUT TERRY VIRTS

Friday, December 14, 7 pm

McCoy Center (100 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., New Albany)

National Geographic Live, National Geographic’s touring speaker series, will present “View from Above” with Terry Virts, a celebrated NASA astronaut and National Geographic author. Virts will share his unique stories and stunning photographs taken from a place many will never visit — space. Tickets are $31.50 at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.capa.com

The 2018-19 Marquee Series at the McCoy Center for the Arts is made possible through the generous support of the New Albany Community Foundation and Lbrands Foundation.

About National Geographic Partners LLC

National Geographic Partners LLC (NGP), a joint venture between National Geographic and 21st Century Fox, is committed to bringing the world premium science, adventure and exploration content across an unrivaled portfolio of media assets. NGP combines the global National Geographic television channels (National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo MUNDO, Nat Geo PEOPLE) with National Geographic’s media and consumer-oriented assets, including National Geographic magazines; National Geographic studios; related digital and social media platforms; books; maps; children’s media; and ancillary activities that include travel, global experiences and events, archival sales, licensing and e-commerce businesses. Furthering knowledge and understanding of our world has been the core purpose of National Geographic for 130 years, and now we are committed to going deeper, pushing boundaries, going further for our consumers … and reaching millions of people around the world in 172 countries and 43 languages every month as we do it. NGP returns 27 percent of our proceeds to the nonprofit National Geographic Society to fund work in the areas of science, exploration, conservation and education. For more information visit natgeotv.com or nationalgeographic.com.

About the Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts

The Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, established in 2007 by a unique joint operating agreement between the New Albany Community Foundation, the City of New Albany, Plain Township, and the New Albany Plain Local School District. Since opening in 2008, the McCoy Center has drawn more than 100,000 people, fulfilling its mission of fostering an appreciation of arts and culture by providing life-long learning opportunities through education, exposure, and participation. For more information, visit www.mccoycenter.org.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: SYMPHONY FOR OUR WORLD

COMES TO THE OHIO THEATRE MARCH 21

Pre-Sale Begins Today

Tickets Go On Sale to the General Public November 23

National Geographic and Jason Michael Paul Entertainment, Inc., today announced an all-new tour for National Geographic: Symphony for Our World, which will perform in Columbus on Thursday, March 21, at the Ohio Theatre. Symphony for Our World combines stunning National Geographic natural history footage with an original symphony and theme created by Emmy- and BAFTA-nominated Bleeding Fingers Music. Featuring composers Austin Fray and Andrew Christie, the show brings audiences a breathtaking musical journey coupled with some of the world’s most incredible wildlife spectacles. Tickets go on sale to the general public on November 23 at www.NatGeo-Symphony.com.

CAPA presents National Geographic: Symphony for Our World at the Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.) on Thursday, March 21, at 7:30pm. Tickets are $58.50-$98.50 and can be purchased in person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

The tour kicks off in March 2019, and beginning today, people can visit www.NatGeo-Symphony.com and register to receive a pre-sale password to buy tickets before the general public. Pre-sale tickets will be available beginning Tuesday, November 13, when passwords will be emailed to all registered customers.

The inspiring 90-minute, live orchestral performance uses groundbreaking imagery and storytelling from over 130 years of National Geographic history matched in perfect synchronization with an orchestra and choir. The show is based on the national television broadcast of “Symphony for Our World,” an hour-long special that premiered globally earlier this year in 140 countries, commercial-free, on Nat Geo WILD.

Driven by a five-part composition, Symphony for Our World pairs artistry with science as it brings viewers from the depths of the sea, up coastlines, onto land, through mountains, and into the sky. Each environment will be accompanied by a different orchestral movement, resulting in a powerful musical tribute to the beauty and wonders of our wild world.

“National Geographic has inspired generations to explore, understand, and protect our world. Bringing this type of storytelling to life in a symphony is an incredible honor,” said Jason Michael Paul, president of Jason Michael Paul Entertainment, Inc. “We’re bringing together everything I’ve learned from over 20 years in music production with National Geographic to create something truly special.”

“Symphony for Our World has been thrilling audiences worldwide since it premiered last Earth Day,” said Gary Knell, chairman of National Geographic Partners. “The show embodies our commitment to inspire people to care about the planet, now. We are happy to be bringing it to audiences in North America. Our partner, Jason Michael Paul Entertainment, Inc., has done a phenomenal job bringing National Geographic’s 130 years of storytelling to life in a new, incredibly moving format that enables audiences to better understand the world and their place in it.”

For more information, tour dates and tickets, visit www.natgeo-symphony.com. Additional updates are available on Twitter and Facebook.

www.NatGeo-Symphony.com

CALENDAR LISTING

CAPA presents NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: SYMPHONY FOR OUR WORLD

Thursday, March 21, 7:30pm

Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.)

Symphony for Our World combines stunning National Geographic natural history footage with an original symphony in a breathtaking musical journey through some of the world’s most incredible wildlife spectacles. With a live orchestra and choir, this 90-minute, live performance takes audiences from the depths of the sea, up coastlines, over mountains, and soaring into the sky. Tickets are $58.50-$98.50 and can be purchased in person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.capa.com

About Jason Michael Paul Entertainment

A pioneer and leader in the live symphonic concert industry, Jason Michael Paul Entertainment, Inc. has been responsible for producing world-renowned concerts including events for The Three Tenors, Luciano Pavarotti, Dear Friends ~ Music from FINAL FANTASY, More Friends ~ Music from FINAL FANTASY, PLAY! A Video Game Symphony, rePLAY: Symphony of Heroes, The Legend of Zelda- 25th Anniversary Concerts and The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses. For more information, please visit https://jmpent.com.

About National Geographic Partners LLC

National Geographic Partners LLC (NGP), a joint venture between National Geographic and 21st Century Fox, is committed to bringing the world premium science, adventure and exploration content across an unrivaled portfolio of media assets. NGP combines the global National Geographic television channels (National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo MUNDO, Nat Geo PEOPLE) with National Geographic’s media and consumer-oriented assets, including National Geographic magazines; National Geographic studios; related digital and social media platforms; books; maps; children’s media; and ancillary activities that include travel, global experiences and events, archival sales, licensing and e-commerce businesses. Furthering knowledge and understanding of our world has been the core purpose of National Geographic for 130 years, and now we are committed to going deeper, pushing boundaries, going further for our consumers … and reaching millions of people around the world in 172 countries and 43 languages every month as we do it. NGP returns 27 percent of our proceeds to the nonprofit National Geographic Society to fund work in the areas of science, exploration, conservation and education. Visit natgeotv.com or nationalgeographic.com for more information, or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn and Pinterest.

About Bleeding Fingers Music

Emmy- and BAFTA-nominated Bleeding Fingers Music has assembled an exceptional and sonically diverse roster of composers to create superlative original film and television scores. Co-founded by Hans Zimmer, Extreme Music CEO Russell Emanuel, Steven Kofsky and SonyATV, the company’s core belief is that collaboration breeds innovation and working in an environment where the gifted are empowered to be adventurous, experimental and creatively generous results in extraordinary music. Our 20 state-of-the-art studios based on Zimmer’s world-renowned campus and our best-in-class production team allow us the ability to produce music at the very highest standard. Bleeding Fingers has created original music for productions including Fox’s The Simpsons, BBC’s Blue Planet II, Planet Earth II, and Big Cats, National Geographic’s Diana: In Her Own Words and Challenger Disaster: Lost Tapes, Sony’s Snatch (TV), Netflix’s original Dope, History Channel’s Mountain Men and BBC America’s Superfly.

About Innovation Arts & Entertainment

Innovation Arts & Entertainment is a 17-year-old boutique, live entertainment producer based in Chicago, IL. IAE prides itself in producing events within the domain of Intelligent Entertainment, producing unique live experiences that result in expanding the knowledge and worldview of audiences that participate. In the last five years alone, IAE has produced tours for Hillary Clinton, Anthony Bourdain, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, David Sedaris, and Chris and Martin Kratt from PBS. In addition to Together Live 2018, other current touring projects include the North American Tour of Harry Potter In Concert, National Geographic’s Symphony for Our World, David Sedaris’ 2018 and 2019 tours, and five new projects in development. At IAE, we relish the opportunity to use the power of art, entertainment, information, and education in such a way that our audiences are changed for the better.

The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, education excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. CAPA also appreciates the generous support of the Barbara B. Coons and Robert Bartels Funds of The Columbus Foundation and the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

About CAPA

Owner/operator of downtown Columbus’ magnificent historic theatres (Ohio Theatre, Palace Theatre, Southern Theatre) and manager of the Riffe Center Theatre Complex, Lincoln Theatre, Drexel Theatre, Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts (New Albany, OH), and the Shubert Theatre (New Haven, CT), CAPA is a non-profit, award-winning presenter of national and international performing arts and entertainment. For more information, visit www.capa.com.

The Conversation

Why space debris cleanup might be a national security threat

November 13, 2018

Author: Saadia Pekkanen, Professor of International Studies; Adjunct Professor of Law, University of Washington

Disclosure statement: The author does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article. She has received funding for 2017-2019 from the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP) for a research project on emerging frontiers in space. She is Founding Co-Chair of the U.S.-Japan Space Forum, and as an academic member of the Washington State Space Coalition (which merged with AFA) she has been asked to serve on space-related advisory committees for both AFA and PNAA.

Partners: University of Washington provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

As an international relations scholar who studies space law and policy, I have come to realize what most people do not fully appreciate: Dealing with space debris is as much a national security issue as it is a technical one.

Considering the debris circling the Earth as just an obstacle in the path of human missions is naive. As outer space activities are deeply rooted in the geopolitics down on Earth, the hidden challenge posed by the debris is the militarization of space technologies meant to clean it up.

To be clear, space debris poses considerable risks; however, to understand those risks, I should explain what it is and how it is formed. The term “space debris” refers to defunct human-made objects, relics left over from activities dating back to the early days of the space age. Over time that definition has expanded to include big and small things like discarded boosters, retired satellites, leftover bits and pieces from spacecraft, screwdrivers, tools, nuts and bolts, shards, lost gloves, and even flecks of paint.

From the 23,000 pieces of debris in Earth orbit that are larger than 5-10 centimeters that we can track and catalog, to the hundreds of millions that we cannot, there is little question that both big and small objects whizzing around at lethal speeds endanger the prospects for civilian, commercial and military missions in outer space. You may pick apart what the movie “Gravity” got wrong, but what it got unforgettably right was the sense of devastation wrought by an orbital debris cloud that destroyed equipment and killed three astronauts on impact. No matter its size, space debris can be lethal to humans and machines alike.

As of early 2018, the European Space Agency (ESA) estimates that there have been about 500 break-ups, collisions, explosions or other fragmentation events to date that yielded space debris. Some of these events are caused by accidents. NASA reported the first-ever known collision between two objects in space in July 1996, when a European booster collided with a French spacecraft. That incident created one new piece of debris, which was itself promptly cataloged. Yet accidents can also have a big impact on increasing the debris cloud. In 2009, for the first time ever, a functioning U.S. communications satellite, Iridium-33, collided with a non-functioning Russian one, Cosmos-2251, as they both passed over extreme northern Siberia. This single crash generated more than 2,300 fragments of debris.

Natural fragmentation versus deliberate destruction

Space debris may also be affected by the breakup of older spacecraft. In February 2015, a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP-F13) spacecraft, called USA 109, which had gone up 20 years earlier, blew up due to a battery malfunction. It may have contributed 100 debris pieces that were tracked by military radars on Earth, and possibly also 50,000 shards larger than 1 millimeter that defied tracking because they are too tiny. Because of the satellite’s original high altitude, all those fragments will remain in orbit for decades, posing risks for other spacecraft. In November 2015, again due to a possible battery failure, another decommissioned U.S weather satellite, NOAA-16, crumbled adding 136 new objects to the debris cloud.

Notably, debris itself can also fragment. In February 2018, a discarded tank from the upper stages of a Ukrainian-Russian Zenit-3F rocket fragmented.

Debris can also fall back down on Earth, whether from natural orbital decay or controlled re-entry. Fortunately most such falling debris lands in the Earth’s oceans. But sometimes it does not, and these rare events may become a bigger hazard in the years ahead as the size of the debris cloud grows, and as the projected fleet of commercial small satellites becomes a reality. Recently, parts of Zenit rocket debris are reported to have ended up crash-landing in Peru. One of the most recent such events just took place in October 2018. The U.S. military identified a fuel tank from a decade-or-so-old Iridium satellite that crashed in a walnut orchard in Hanford, California.

Then there are the highly publicized deliberate events that add to the debris cloud. In 2007, China used a ground-based direct-ascent missile to take out its own aging weather satellite, the Fengyun-1C. This event created an estimated 3,400 pieces of debris that will be around for several decades before decaying.

China’s actions were widely seen as an anti-satellite test (ASAT), a signal of the country’s expanding military space capabilities. Having the ability to shoot down a satellite to gain a military advantage back on Earth exposes the basic nature of the threat: Those who are most dependent on space assets – namely, the United States, with an estimated 46 percent of the total 1,886 currently operational satellites – are also the most vulnerable to the space debris created deliberately. There is no doubt that the aggressor will also lose in such a scenario – but that collateral damage may be worthwhile if your more heavily space-dependent rival is dealt a more crippling blow.

Stealth ‘counterspace race’

The set of government or commercial solutions to counter orbital debris – whether lasers, nets, magnets, tethers, robotic arms or co-orbiting service satellites – have only fueled the prospects for a stealthy race for dominance in outer space.

The same technology that captures or zaps or drags away the debris can do the same to a functioning spacecraft. Since nobody can be sure about the intent behind such proposed “commercial” space debris cleanup technologies, governments will race to get ahead of their market competitors. It matters how and with what intent you counter space debris with dual-use technologies, and more so at a time of flux in the world order. Both the old and new space powers can easily cloak their military intentions in legitimate concerns about, and possibly commercial solutions to, debris hazards. And there are now a number of open assessments about space junk removal technologies that can double up as military programs, such as lasers or hunters.

This fusion of the market and the military is not a conspiracy but a reality. If you are a great power like the United States that is heavily dependent on space assets in both the economic and military realms, then you are vulnerable to both orbital debris and the technologies proposed for its cleanup. And both your allies and your rivals know it.

This is how we have ended up in a counterspace race, which is nothing like your grandfather’s space race. In a fundamental way, this new race reflects the volatile geopolitics of peer or near-peer competitors today, and there is no getting away from it in any domain. Just as on Earth, in the cosmos the world’s top space powers – the United States, China, Japan, Russia, India – have moved from merely space situational awareness to all-out battlespace awareness. If things stay the course, accidental or deliberate events involving orbital debris are poised to ravage peaceful prospects in outer space.

How then do we move forward so that outer space remains safe, sustainable and secure for all powers, whether big or small? This is not a task any one single nation — no matter how great — can carry out successfully on its own. The solutions must not only be technological or military, either. For peaceful solutions to last, deterrence and diplomacy, as well as public awareness, will have to be proactively forged by the world’s space powers, leaders and thinkers.

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Features

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