Kid Rock kicked off from parade


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FILE- In this Oct. 17, 2018, file photo Kid Rock performs during a rally for Republican U.S. Senate candidate John James in Pontiac, Mich. Nashville’s mayor might be a no-show at a city Christmas parade if Kid Rock serves as grand marshal. A spokesman for Mayor David Briley says Kid Rock’s comments about “The View” host Joy Behar were “hateful” and that the singer doesn’t belong at the head of a parade. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

FILE- In this Oct. 17, 2018, file photo Kid Rock performs during a rally for Republican U.S. Senate candidate John James in Pontiac, Mich. Nashville’s mayor might be a no-show at a city Christmas parade if Kid Rock serves as grand marshal. A spokesman for Mayor David Briley says Kid Rock’s comments about “The View” host Joy Behar were “hateful” and that the singer doesn’t belong at the head of a parade. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)


FILE - In this April 22, 2018 file photo, James Shaw Jr., shows his hand that was injured when he disarmed a shooter inside a Waffle House, in Nashville, Tenn. Kid Rock's profane comments Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, on live TV have gotten him booted from leading the Nashville Christmas Parade. Instead, parade organizers have invited Shaw, the man hailed as a community hero for wrestling a gun away from the shooter during a Nashville Waffle House shooting in April that killed four people and injured four others. (Larry McCormack/The Tennessean via AP, File)


FILE- In this Nov. 13, 2018, file photo Nashville Mayor David Briley speaks during an announcement that Amazon will locate an operations hub in Nashville, Tenn. Briley might be a no-show at a city Christmas parade if Kid Rock serves as grand marshal. A spokesman for Briley says Kid Rock’s comments about “The View” host Joy Behar were “hateful” and that the singer doesn’t belong at the head of a parade. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)


Kid Rock booted from leading parade after profane TV remarks

By JONATHAN MATTISE

Associated Press

Monday, December 3

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Kid Rock’s profane comments on live TV have gotten him booted from leading the Nashville Christmas Parade.

Instead, parade organizers have invited James Shaw Jr., the man hailed as a community hero for wrestling a gun away from the shooter during a Nashville Waffle House shooting in April that killed four people and injured four others.

On Friday morning, Kid Rock used an expletive to describe Joy Behar during an interview Friday on “Fox & Friends.” He did the interview from his bar in Nashville, where he swigged bourbon while tending bar on camera and said he had been drinking coffee and Irish cream liqueur.

“God forbid you say something a little wrong; you’re racist, homophobic, Islamophobic, this that and the other. People need to calm down, get a little less politically correct,” Kid Rock said. “And I would say, you know, love everybody. Except, I’d say screw that Joy Behar (expletive).”

Multiple “Fox & Friends” personalities apologized on air afterward. Kid Rock apologized for the language, but “not the sentiment.”

Several parade organizers announced Friday evening that the parade will no longer feature Kid Rock, who had volunteered to be the grand marshal. Shaw, who has become a national figure after his heroics in the spring, has accepted the invitation, according to a spokesman for the group of organizers.

“Parade organizers feel that the grand marshal should personify the spirit of the Nashville community,” read the statement from organizers Piedmont Natural Gas, Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, and Tennessee Holiday Productions.

The main sponsors include Piedmont Natural Gas and five bars on Nashville’s main nightlife strip, including Kid Rock’s establishment. The proceeds from the parade are going to the Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

The bars were noticeably absent from the statement announcing that Kid Rock would no longer be in the parade.

Kid Rock’s comments drew quick backlash, with a spokesman for Mayor David Briley saying he was leaning against participating in the parade if the singer was leading it, citing the “hateful” words.

“When you have the grand marshal of what’s labeled Nashville’s Christmas parade saying hateful things on national television, the mayor obviously does not want to be included in an event with someone like that,” spokesman Thomas Mulgrew said.

At least one other Nashville politician, Metro Nashville councilman Freddie O’Connell, said on Twitter before Kid Rock was dropped that he wouldn’t participate in the parade. “The choice of grand marshal evokes neither the spirit of Christmas nor the inclusivity I think represents the best of Nashville,” he wrote.

Briley is a liberal Democrat. Kid Rock, a brash Detroit-area musician whose real name is Robert Ritchie, for a while teased a Republican run for the U.S. Senate in the 2018 election.

A publicist for Kid Rock did not immediately messages requesting comment Friday.

Kristin Hall in Nashville contributed to this report.

OSHP to Participate in Multi-State Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Operation Involving interstates 70 and 75

COLUMBUS – Ohio State Highway Patrol troopers and motor carrier enforcement inspectors, along with members of the Great Lakes Initiative will focus on a coordinated enforcement operation. Troopers and inspectors will focus on conducting roadside level 3 inspections and traffic enforcement on interstates 70 and 75.

Level 3 inspections target driver qualifications, including proper licensing, medical certificates and hours of service. Ohio’s operation seeks to reduce commercial vehicle crashes along both interstates 70 and 75 corridors.

The initiative began on December 3 and will run through December 7. The high visibility enforcement will consist of officers from the Indiana, Illinois and Michigan state police departments.

Multi-state commercial vehicle enforcement initiatives allow for neighboring states to align their resources to collectively focus attention on safety concerns involving interstate traffic. The Patrol’s participation in these joint initiatives aims to increase the safety of those traveling on Ohio’s roads.

CSO to Perform Leningrad Symphony in Russian Winter Festival January 4 & 5

The Columbus Symphony to Perform Shostakovich’s Leningrad Symphony January 4 & 5 in First Half of the Russian Winter Festival

Music Director Rossen Milanov and the Columbus Symphony begin 2019 with a performance of Shostakovich’s iconic Leningrad Symphony inspired by Nazi Germany’s siege of the city during World War II. One of the composer’s most power compositions, this work conveys tragedy, oppression, resistance, and ultimately, victory. The performance will be accompanied by excerpts of the 1997 documentary about Soviet composer Dmitri Shostakovich titled The War Symphonies: Shostakovich Against Stalin.

The Columbus Symphony presents the Russian Winter Festival I: Leningrad Symphony at the Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.) on Friday and Saturday, January 4 and 5, at 8pm. Tickets start at $10 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.columbussymphony.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. The CAPA Ticket Center will also be open two hours prior to each performance.

Prelude – Patrons are invited to join Maestro Milanov and the musicians of the Columbus Symphony in the theatre at 7pm for a 30-minute, pre-concert discussion about the works to be performed.

Postlude – Directly following the performance, patrons are invited to stay for a vodka tasting in the pavilion.

Mozart to Matisse – Wednesday, January 2, 2pm, Columbus Museum of Art (480 E. Broad St.)

In collaboration with the Columbus Museum of Art (CMA), this event will combine a chamber music performance by CSO musicians with an illustrated talk on the Russian poster art of WWII that chronicles the brief period during which Americans were allied with Soviets in the struggle to defeat the Nazis. These rare posters promoted the anti-German cause with gruesome images of Nazi brutality, ruthless political caricatures, and idealized depictions of heroic workers and soldiers designed to inspire the Soviet citizenry. Tickets are $5 for CMA members or $20 for non-members (which also includes admission to the museum) and can be purchased by calling CMA at 614.629.0359.

About CSO Music Director Rossen Milanov

Respected and admired by audiences and musicians alike, Rossen Milanov is currently the music director of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra (CSO), Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, Princeton Symphony Orchestra, and the Orquesta Sinfónica del Principado de Asturias (OSPA) in Spain.

In 2017, Milanov received an Arts Prize from The Columbus Foundation for presenting Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony as part of CSO’s 2017 Picnic with the Pops summer series. Under his leadership, the organization has expanded its reach by connecting original programming with community-wide initiatives, such as focusing on women composers and nature conservancy, presenting original festivals, and supporting and commissioning new music.

Milanov has collaborated with some of the world’s preeminent artists, including Yo-Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Joshua Bell, Midori, Christian Tetzlaff, and André Watts. During his 11-year tenure with The Philadelphia Orchestra, he conducted more than 200 performances. In 2015, he completed a 15-year tenure as music director of nationally recognized training orchestra Symphony in C in New Jersey. In 2013, he wrapped up a 17-year tenure with the New Symphony Orchestra in his native city of Sofia, Bulgaria. His passion for new music has resulted in numerous world premieres of works by composers such as Derek Bermel, Mason Bates, Caroline Shaw, Phillip Glass, Richard Danielpour, Nicolas Maw, and Gabriel Prokofiev, among others.

Noted for his versatility, Milanov is also a welcomed presence in the worlds of opera and ballet. He has collaborated with Komische Oper Berlin for Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mtzensk), Opera Oviedo for the Spanish premiere of Tchaikovsky’s Mazzepa and Bartok’s Bluebeard’s Castle (awarded best Spanish production for 2015), and Opera Columbus for Verdi’s La Traviata.

An experienced ballet conductor, he has been seen at New York City Ballet and collaborated with some of the best-known choreographers of our time, such Mats Ek, Benjamin Millepied, and most recently, Alexei Ratmansky in the critically acclaimed revival of Swan Lake in Zurich with the Zurich Ballet, and in Paris with La Scala Ballet.

About composer Dmitri Shostakovich (1906–75)

Russian composer and pianist Dmitri Shostakovich is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century. A polystylist, Shostakovich developed a hybrid voice, combining a variety of different musical techniques into his works. His music is characterized by sharp contrasts, elements of the grotesque, and ambivalent tonality. He was also heavily influenced by the neo-classical style pioneered by Stravinsky, and especially in his symphonies, by the late Romanticism of Mahler. Shostakovich achieved fame in the Soviet Union under the patronage of Soviet chief of staff Mikhail Tukhachevsky, but later had a complex and difficult relationship with the government.

Symphony No. 7 in C major, Op. 60 (titled Leningrad) was written roughly around 1939-40. Initially dedicated to the life and deeds of Vladimir Lenin, Shostakovich decided instead to dedicate the symphony to the city of Leningrad upon its completion in December 1941. The piece soon became very popular in both the Soviet Union and the West as a symbol of resistance to Nazi totalitarianism and militarism. It is still regarded as the major musical testament of the estimated 27 million Soviet citizens who lost their lives in WWII. The symphony is played frequently at the Leningrad Cemetery, where half a million victims of the 900-day Siege of Leningrad are buried.

www.columbussymphony.com

CALENDAR LISTING

The Columbus Symphony presents RUSSIAN WINTER FESTIVAL I: LENINGRAD SYMPHONY

Friday & Saturday, January 4 & 5, 8 pm

Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.)

Music Director Rossen Milanov and the Columbus Symphony begin 2019 with a performance of Shostakovich’s iconic Leningrad Symphony inspired by Nazi Germany’s siege of the city during World War II. One of the composer’s most power compositions, this work conveys tragedy, oppression, resistance, and ultimately, victory. The performance will be accompanied by excerpts of the 1997 documentary about Soviet composer Dmitri Shostakovich titled The War Symphonies: Shostakovich Against Stalin. Tickets start at $10 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.columbussymphony.com, or by phone at (614) 228-8600 or (800) 745-3000. www.columbussymphony.com

The 2018-19 season is made possible in part by state tax dollars allocated by the Ohio Legislature to the Ohio Arts Council (OAC). The OAC is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally, and economically. The CSO also appreciates the support of the Greater Columbus Arts Council, supporting the city’s artists and arts organizations since 1973, and the Kenneth L. Coe and Jack Barrow, and Mr. and Mrs. Derrol R. Johnson funds of The Columbus Foundation, assisting donors and others in strengthening our community for the benefit of all its citizens.

About the Columbus Symphony Orchestra

Founded in 1951, the Columbus Symphony is the only full-time, professional symphony in central Ohio. Through an array of innovative artistic, educational, and community outreach programming, the Columbus Symphony is reaching an expanding, more diverse audience each year. This season, the Columbus Symphony will share classical music with more than 200,000 people in central Ohio through concerts, radio broadcasts, and special programming. For more information, visit www.columbussymphony.com.

AP FACT CHECK: Trump’s mangled truths on Russia probe, Cohen

By CALVIN WOODWARD and HOPE YEN

Associated Press

Monday, December 3

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump can’t seem to get his facts straight when it comes to the Russia investigation.

Facing pressure as his former advisers are caught lying by special counsel Robert Mueller, Trump is launching fresh attacks on the probe as politically biased and Mueller as hopelessly “conflicted.” This runs counter to ethics experts in Trump’s Justice Department who concluded that Mueller — a Republican — could fairly lead the probe into possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

Trump also suggests that the crimes of his longtime lawyer, Michael Cohen, have “nothing” to do with him. That’s also wrong. Cohen was the first to implicate the president in open court of a crime. Last week, Cohen also pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about his efforts during the 2016 campaign to line up a Trump Tower Moscow project, saying he did so to align with Trump’s “political messaging.”

Meanwhile, Trump displayed a slippery grasp of the environment as well as trade policy. He also spread around to his millions of Twitter followers a wildly false claim that people in the country illegally get more aid from the federal government than Americans get in Social Security benefits.

A look at his statements and the reality:

RUSSIA INVESTIGATION

TRUMP, on Cohen: “He was convicted with a fairly long-term sentence on things totally unrelated to the Trump Organization — having to do with mortgages, and having to do with cheating the IRS perhaps. A lot of different things. I don’t know exactly, but he was convicted of various things unrelated to us. …So, very simply, Michael Cohen is lying and he’s trying to get a reduced sentence for things that have nothing to do with me.” — remarks to reporters Thursday.

THE FACTS: Cohen definitely was in trouble for what he did for Trump. He pleaded guilty in August to several criminal charges and stated in open court that Trump directed him to arrange payments of hush money to porn actress Stormy Daniels and former Playboy model Karen McDougal to fend off damage to Trump’s White House bid.

Cohen said one payment was made “in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for federal office,” and the other was made “under direction of the same candidate.”

The Justice Department says the hush money payments were unreported campaign contributions meant to influence the outcome of the election. That assertion makes the payments subject to campaign finance laws, which restrict how much people can donate to a campaign and bar corporations from making direct contributions.

It is true that Cohen did not identify Trump, but there was no ambiguity in court documents or in his statement.

Cohen’s extraordinary statement at his August plea hearing marked the first time any Trump associate, in open court, has implicated the president himself in a crime.

Cohen’s guilty plea last week, meanwhile, featured Trump and conversations he and his family had with Cohen about a possible Russian business deal during the 2016 campaign at a level greater than previously known.

Trump is, however, correct that other previous charges which Cohen admitted to didn’t involve the candidate or the campaign and were for tax deception.

TRUMP: “The Phony Witch Hunt continues, but Mueller and his gang of Angry Dems are only looking at one side, not the other. …Mueller is a conflicted prosecutor gone rogue.” — tweet Tuesday.

THE FACTS: Trump makes a baseless charge that Mueller is a “conflicted” prosecutor whose team is a bunch of “angry” Democrats.

Mueller, a longtime Republican, was cleared by the Justice Department to lead the Russia investigation. The department said in May 2017 that its ethics experts “determined that Mr. Mueller’s participation in the matters assigned to him is appropriate.” The issue had come up because of his former position at the WilmerHale law firm, which represented some key players in the probe.

Some on Mueller’s team owe their jobs largely to Republican presidents, while some others have indeed given money to Democratic candidates over the years. But Mueller could not have barred them from serving on that basis because regulations prohibit the consideration of political affiliation for personnel actions involving career attorneys. Mueller was appointed as special counsel by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, a Trump appointee.

THE FIRST BUSH PRESIDENT

TRUMP, on the passing of former President George H.W. Bush: “As a young man, he captained the Yale baseball team, and then went on to serve as the youngest aviator in the United States Navy during the Second World War.” — statement Saturday.

THE FACTS: Trump mixes up Bush’s timeline, in which he put off college to enlist in the Navy after the U.S. entered World War II. Bush joined the Navy in 1942 upon graduating from Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, at age 18, six months after the December 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor. He was the youngest pilot in the Navy at the time.

Bush received an honorable discharge in 1945 and enrolled at Yale, where he was captain of the baseball team. “A lot of us on the team were veterans and we had come back from the war, so maybe that made it a little less apprehensive,” Bush told The Associated Press in 2007. “On the other hand, it didn’t deduct from our enthusiasm and our desire to win, which we did not do.”

TRADE

TRUMP: “Billions of Dollars are pouring into the coffers of the U.S.A. because of the Tariffs being charged to China, and there is a long way to go. If companies don’t want to pay Tariffs, build in the U.S.A. Otherwise, lets (sic) just make our Country richer than ever before.” — tweet Thursday.

THE FACTS: That’s not how it works. Yes, money from tariffs is going into the federal treasury, but it’s coming from U.S. businesses, not from overseas. Tariffs are paid by the importer, not the exporter or government in another country.

Beyond that, tariffs paid by U.S. companies tend to result in higher prices for consumers. So a tariff is a transfer of wealth from business to government, and sometimes from consumers to government as well. It is not a foreign payment to the U.S.

TRUMP, on the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement: “The USMCA is the largest, most significant, modern and balanced trade agreement in history. All of our countries will benefit greatly. It is probably the largest trade deal ever made, also.” — signing ceremony Friday.

THE FACTS: It’s not the largest trade deal ever made. It covers the same three countries as its predecessor, NAFTA. In contrast, the Uruguay Round of trade negotiations concluded in 1994 created the World Trade Organization and was signed by 123 countries. The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston found the following year that the WTO’s initial membership accounted for more than 90 percent of global economic output.

TRUMP, on the pact with Canada and Mexico: “This is a model agreement that changes the trade landscape forever.” He also referred to the pact as a “landmark agreement.” — ceremony Friday.

THE FACTS: Actually, the pact preserves the structure and substance of NAFTA, which was unquestionably a landmark, whether for better or worse.

In one new feature, the deal requires that 40 percent of cars’ contents eventually be made in countries that pay autoworkers at least $16 an hour — that is, in the United States and Canada and not in Mexico — to qualify for duty-free treatment. It also requires Mexico to pursue an overhaul of labor law to encourage independent unions that will bargain for higher wages and better working conditions for Mexicans.

But the agreement is largely an incremental revision of NAFTA. Philip Levy, senior fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and a trade official in Republican President George W. Bush’s White House, says: “President Trump has seriously overhyped this agreement.”

MANUFACTURING

TRUMP: “Remember the previous administration said, oh, manufacturing jobs, that will never happen. I kept saying, what’s he talking about? Manufacturing, we got to make things, right? They said manufacturing jobs would never come back. You’d need a magic wand. Well, we found the magic wand. And they’re great jobs. They’re high-paying jobs. They’re brilliant jobs. They’re important jobs.” — Biloxi, Mississippi, rally on Nov. 26.

THE FACTS: No magic wand has swept across manufacturing.

Yes, manufacturing jobs have been added under Trump, but the sector is nowhere close to its old glory.

As of October, the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that 8.53 percent of the 149.8 million U.S. jobs were in manufacturing. Back in October 2008, 9.65 percent of U.S. jobs were in manufacturing. Even if factories keep hiring workers, factories are unlikely to return to the prominence of Trump’s childhood because so many other segments of the U.S. economy — such as health care — have grown.

In 1946, the year Trump was born, nearly a third of U.S. workers had manufacturing jobs.

Growth in manufacturing employment began in President Barack Obama’s second term, when 386,000 jobs were added, and accelerated under Trump, with 416,000 more jobs in his first 21 months.

TRUMP: “Our steel industry a year ago was dead, and now it’s one of the most vibrant anywhere in the world, because we stopped the steel dumping and we put a big tax on. When they steel dump, they can dump all they want, but they pay 25 percent on everything they dump, and our steel now is doing great. Our industry has come back.” — Mississippi rally.

TRUMP: “Big Steel is opening and renovating plants all over the country.” — tweet Thursday.

THE FACTS: He’s exaggerating the recovery of the steel industry.

As of October, there were 381,700 jobs in the manufacturing of primary metals such as steel. That figure seesaws based off commodity prices and global economic performance. But it’s clearly trended downward since 2000 when the sector had 621,800 jobs.

It’s difficult to know just how many jobs will be added by newly planned mills. But construction spending on factories has yet to take off significantly after having been in decline between 2016 and much of 2018. Still, the spending has rebounded in recent months. Construction spending on factories has increased 4.3 percent in the past year, according to the Census Bureau.

A year ago, the steel industry employed 141,200 people, says the Labor Department. Now, 145,100. That’s a gain of 3,900 jobs during a period when the overall economy added 2.5 million jobs.

Steel wasn’t at death’s door a year ago and it isn’t “back” in any historic sense.

ENVIRONMENT

TRUMP: “You look at our air and our water and it’s right now at a record clean.” — interview Tuesday with The Washington Post.

THE FACTS: No, the air isn’t the cleanest ever. The air generally has been getting cleaner since the 1970s, but the downward trend in pollution has made a bit of a U-turn since Trump took office.

His Environmental Protection Agency released data that showed traditional air pollution — soot and smog — increased in 2017 and that the air is not the cleanest it has ever been.

The days with an unhealthy number of small pollution particles, often called soot and linked to heart and lung problems and deaths, jumped from 2016 to 2017 in 35 major metropolitan areas. In 2017, there were 179 unhealthy soot days, up 85 percent from 97 in 2016. Last year had the most unhealthy soot days since 2011.

The number of days with unhealthy smog levels was down from 2016, but higher than 2015, 2014 and 2013.

The number of days when the air quality index was unhealthy was 729 in 2017. The number of days is higher than a year because it counts each city’s unhealthy reading on a certain day as one and there are numerous cities involved.

Last year’s level was the highest since 2012 and a 21 percent increase over the cleanest air in 2014.

TRUMP: “I mean, we take thousands of tons of garbage off our beaches all the time that comes over from Asia. It just flows right down the Pacific, it flows, and we say where does this come from?” — Post interview.

THE FACTS: Singling out Asia for America’s dirty Pacific beaches is an evasion.

Pacific currents do bring some trash from Asia, most noticeably during the 2011 tsunami, but it is rare that scientists can trace trash to a specific geographic location, said oceanographer Kara Lavender Law at the Sea Education Association, who said Trump’s “statement is not supported by the data.”

Americans dirty their own coastlines because “we produce double more trash per person than most of the people living in Southeast Asia,” said Jenna Jambeck, a University of Georgia environmental engineering expert who studies marine debris.

SARAH HUCKABEE SANDERS, on Trump rejecting a dire White House report’s conclusion on the economic costs of climate change: “This report is based on the most extreme modeled scenario, which contradicts long-established trends. …This is the most extreme version and it’s not based on facts.” — press briefing Tuesday.

THE FACTS: She’s wrong. The 29-chapter report actually lays out various scenarios that the United Nations’ climate assessments use. Economists say the cost estimates are credible and may even understate the economic impact.

The National Climate Assessment report considers three scenarios in estimating future costs. One is the business-as-usual scenario, which scientists say is closest to the current situation. That is the worst case of the three scenarios. Another would envision modest reductions in heat-trapping gases, and the third would involve severe cuts in carbon dioxide pollution.

For example, under the business-as-usual scenario in which emissions of heat-trapping gasses continue at current levels, labor costs in outdoor industries during heat waves could cost $155 billion in lost wages per year by 2090. Modest reductions in carbon pollution would cut that to $75 billion a year, the report said.

The report talks of hundreds of billions of dollars in economic losses in several spots. In one graphic, it shows the worst-case business-as-usual scenario of economic costs reaching 10 percent of gross domestic product when Earth is about a dozen degrees warmer than now with no specific date.

Economist Ray Kopp, a vice president at the think tank Resources For the Future and who wasn’t part of the assessment, said the economics and the science in the report were sound.

Yale economist William Nordhaus, who won the 2018 Nobel prize for economics for his work on climate change, told The Associated Press that his calculations show climate change would cost the United States an even higher $4 trillion a year at the end of the century with a reasonable projection of warming. He said the White House report’s economic conclusions used standard economic modeling.

IMMIGRATION

TRUMP’s retweet: “Illegals can get up to $3,874 a month under Federal Assistance program. Our social security checks are on average $1200 a month. RT (retweet) if you agree: If you weren’t born in the United States, you should receive $0 assistance.” — posted Wednesday.

THE FACTS: Wrong country, wrong numbers, wrong description of legal status of the recipients. Besides that, immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally do not qualify for most federal benefits, even when they’re paying taxes, and those with legal status make up a small portion of those who use public benefits.

The $3,874 refers to a payment made in Canada, not the U.S., to a legally admitted family of refugees. It was largely a one-time resettlement payment under Canada’s refugee program, not monthly assistance in perpetuity, the fact-checking site Snopes found a year ago in debunking a Facebook post that misrepresented Canada’s policy. A document cited in the Facebook post, showing aid for food, transportation and other basics needs, applied to a family of five.

Apart from confusing Canada with the United States, the tweet distributed by the president misstated how much Americans get from Social Security on average — $1,419 a month for retired workers, not $1,200.

Overall, low-income immigrants who are not yet U.S. citizens use Medicaid, food aid, cash assistance and Supplemental Security Income aid at a lower rate than comparable U.S.-born adults, according to an Associated Press analysis of census data. Non-citizen immigrants make up only 6.5 percent of all those participating in Medicaid, for example.

Despite that, the administration wants to redefine the rules for immigrants to further restrict who can receive benefits and for how long.

Associated Press writers Eric Tucker, Paul Wiseman, Josh Boak, Christopher Rugaber, Seth Borenstein and Colleen Long in Washington and Tom Krisher in Detroit contributed to this report.

Find AP Fact Checks at http://apne.ws/2kbx8bd

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EDITOR’S NOTE _ A look at the veracity of claims by political figures

Facebook comments

  • “INSTALLED & COMPROMISED” that’s how Rachel Maddow describes how Russia helped to “install” trump then how trump became “compromised.” It all makes perfect sense now! If his supporters can’t see this their just as bad as he is.
  • THOUGHT FOR THE DAY… Did You Know the SAUDI’S Own the ENTIRE 45th Floor of TRUMP TOWER in NY?

FILE- In this Oct. 17, 2018, file photo Kid Rock performs during a rally for Republican U.S. Senate candidate John James in Pontiac, Mich. Nashville’s mayor might be a no-show at a city Christmas parade if Kid Rock serves as grand marshal. A spokesman for Mayor David Briley says Kid Rock’s comments about “The View” host Joy Behar were “hateful” and that the singer doesn’t belong at the head of a parade. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/12/web1_121886075-92e3dbdf87e64cfd9fd2f23edf27a486.jpgFILE- In this Oct. 17, 2018, file photo Kid Rock performs during a rally for Republican U.S. Senate candidate John James in Pontiac, Mich. Nashville’s mayor might be a no-show at a city Christmas parade if Kid Rock serves as grand marshal. A spokesman for Mayor David Briley says Kid Rock’s comments about “The View” host Joy Behar were “hateful” and that the singer doesn’t belong at the head of a parade. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

FILE – In this April 22, 2018 file photo, James Shaw Jr., shows his hand that was injured when he disarmed a shooter inside a Waffle House, in Nashville, Tenn. Kid Rock’s profane comments Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, on live TV have gotten him booted from leading the Nashville Christmas Parade. Instead, parade organizers have invited Shaw, the man hailed as a community hero for wrestling a gun away from the shooter during a Nashville Waffle House shooting in April that killed four people and injured four others. (Larry McCormack/The Tennessean via AP, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/12/web1_121886075-2f219a97b8cd4c48bc5ddb6842f63e27.jpgFILE – In this April 22, 2018 file photo, James Shaw Jr., shows his hand that was injured when he disarmed a shooter inside a Waffle House, in Nashville, Tenn. Kid Rock’s profane comments Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, on live TV have gotten him booted from leading the Nashville Christmas Parade. Instead, parade organizers have invited Shaw, the man hailed as a community hero for wrestling a gun away from the shooter during a Nashville Waffle House shooting in April that killed four people and injured four others. (Larry McCormack/The Tennessean via AP, File)

FILE- In this Nov. 13, 2018, file photo Nashville Mayor David Briley speaks during an announcement that Amazon will locate an operations hub in Nashville, Tenn. Briley might be a no-show at a city Christmas parade if Kid Rock serves as grand marshal. A spokesman for Briley says Kid Rock’s comments about “The View” host Joy Behar were “hateful” and that the singer doesn’t belong at the head of a parade. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/12/web1_121886075-8476155146854c47953eeee75e2a29e0.jpgFILE- In this Nov. 13, 2018, file photo Nashville Mayor David Briley speaks during an announcement that Amazon will locate an operations hub in Nashville, Tenn. Briley might be a no-show at a city Christmas parade if Kid Rock serves as grand marshal. A spokesman for Briley says Kid Rock’s comments about “The View” host Joy Behar were “hateful” and that the singer doesn’t belong at the head of a parade. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
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