Baby elephant born at zoo


OHIO NEWS

Staff Reports



Columbus Zoo Announces Birth of Baby Elephant

Powell, OH – On Thursday, December 6 at 3:09 a.m., the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium welcomed the much-anticipated birth of an Asian elephant in the Zoo’s Asia Quest region. The calf, whose sex has not yet been determined, appears strong.

The calf is the first elephant born at the Columbus Zoo in almost 10 years and the first to be born at the Zoo as a result of artificial insemination. Mother, Phoebe, is a 31-year-old Asian elephant who came to the Zoo in January 2002. While Phoebe has had the opportunity to breed with Hank, a 30-year-old male elephant at the Columbus Zoo, the attempts were unsuccessful and she was also artificially inseminated with sperm from Hank and a male from another zoo. The father of the calf is not yet known and will be determined through a DNA test with results expected in the coming weeks. Artificial insemination enables an elephant to be impregnated at her most fertile time. While still a relatively rare procedure for elephants, attempts to artificially inseminate elephants are becoming more frequent in an effort to bolster the numbers of endangered elephants, whose populations are rapidly declining in their native range.

The calf joins the herd of six Asian elephants in the Asia Quest region: males, Hank and Beco, and females, Phoebe, Connie, Sundara (Sunny) and Rudy. There have been three successful Asian elephant births at the Columbus Zoo throughout the Zoo’s history, and all three have been born to Phoebe —this most recent calf, Beco in 2009 and male, Bodhi, who was born in 2004 and now resides at Denver Zoo. Coco, who passed away at the Columbus Zoo in 2011, was the sire of Beco and Bodhi.

To provide Phoebe and her new baby with time to continue developing a strong bond, they will remain in a behind-the-scenes area. The Zoo will announce viewing information for guests as it becomes available. Additionally, in conjunction with a donor, the public will have an opportunity to help name the calf. Details will be announced at a later date.

“We are very proud to welcome Phoebe’s calf into the elephant herd here at the Columbus Zoo,” said Columbus Zoo President/CEO Tom Stalf. “Each birth contributes to the global population and sustainability of this endangered species and is one worth celebrating as a sign of hope for the future of these incredible animals.”

Elephants have the longest gestational period of all mammals, lasting approximately 22 months. Over the last several months, Phoebe has participated in regular ultrasounds to monitor the development of the calf through the imaging, as well as blood collections to monitor her hormone levels throughout her pregnancy. Phoebe and the unnamed calf will continue to be monitored around the clock by the Zoo’s expert animal care team to ensure they receive the best care possible.

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is a long-time supporter of several direct elephant conservation initiatives benefitting both African and Asian elephants, including annual donations to the International Elephant Foundation and several research projects and grants over the last 23 years. Many of these research projects have focused on improving human-wildlife coexistence and monitoring elephant populations in their native ranges. Zoo visitors also have the opportunity to learn about elephant conservation and how they can contribute to the sustainability of this endangered species at the Zoo’s Elephant Conservation Station inside the “Vanishing Giants” building located in the Asia Quest region.

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species™, Asian elephants are listed as endangered in their native range across southern and southeastern Asia and are in decline due to various factors, including habitat loss/degradation and poaching. The World Elephant Day organization estimates that there are less than 40,000 Asian elephants and fewer than 400,000 African elephants remaining worldwide.

For further updates about Phoebe and her calf, be sure to follow the Zoo’s social media accounts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Columbus Zoo Mourns Loss of Giraffe Calf

Powell, OH – The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is saddened to report the loss of a Masai giraffe calf. Mother, Cami, began to exhibit signs of labor around 3 p.m. on December 4 in a behind-the-scenes area of the Heart of Africa region at the Columbus Zoo. As Cami’s labor progressed, it became evident that the calf was presenting rear hooves first. Giraffe calves are typically born front hooves first, and it is extremely rare for calves to survive after being born rear hooves first.

In order to do everything possible to save both mom and baby, the Columbus Zoo animal care team made the decision to enter the stall and turned off the National Geographic livestream cameras at approximately 4:50 p.m. to allow for the necessary intervention and to ensure that Cami and the calf’s health and safety were not compromised as a result.

During the intervention, the Zoo’s animal care team, as well as a large animal surgeon from The Ohio State University, attempted to manually extract the calf from Cami without success. They then performed an emergency Cesarean section at approximately 8 p.m. While Cami’s condition is currently stable, her prognosis remains guarded, and she will continue to be monitored around the clock by the Zoo’s animal care experts. Cesarean sections in giraffes are extremely rare and typically conducted as a last resort due to the high risks involved in putting giraffes under anesthesia and successful recovery. After the calf was extracted via Cesarean section, the veterinary team found that the calf had serious congenital defects and thus would not have survived even if it had been born front hooves first.

Cami, a 6-year-old female Masai giraffe, came to the Columbus Zoo in 2013 from the Nashville Zoo. Father, Enzi, is the 8-year-old breeding male Masai giraffe, and he arrived at the Columbus Zoo in 2013 after first being at The Wilds and the Toledo Zoo, where he was born. The pairing of Enzi with Cami was based on a breeding recommendation from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP) for giraffes.

The news about Cami’s calf follows the loss of another Masai giraffe, Zuri’s, calf, Ubumwe, who sadly passed away on the morning of November 17. Ubumwe was born on October 30, 2018, and along with Zuri, was monitored around the clock by the animal care team. While regular wellness checks conducted by the animal health team had previously shown that she was growing and developing appropriately, Ubumwe’s behavior and appearance began to change on November 16, and her health suddenly deteriorated. The Zoo’s team of animal care professionals responded quickly, and aggressive treatment and diagnostics, including a CT, were performed to rule out potential causes of her gastrointestinal discomfort. Specialists from The Ohio State University were also available to conduct a comprehensive abdominal ultrasound and review the CT images. Despite intensive overnight care and some improvement in her clinical appearance, Ubumwe unfortunately passed away at approximately 8:30 a.m. At this time, the definitive cause of her death is still unknown until a full pathology report is received. In the meantime, Zuri has returned to the herd and is doing well.

Nineteen giraffes had previously been born at the Columbus Zoo over the course of its history before the arrivals of Cami’s and Zuri’s late calves. The two most recent giraffe births are the first to have occurred in the Heart of Africa region since its opening in 2014. Giraffes typically have a gestation period of around 15 months and will give birth to the calf while standing up. Newborn calves can weigh anywhere from 100-150 pounds and are, on average, around 6 feet tall. According to the Association of Zoos and Aquarium, the mortality rate for giraffe calves in human care is about 25 percent while the mortality rate for giraffe calves in their native range is over 50 percent. Scientists also estimate that only a quarter of giraffe calves reach adulthood in their native ranges due to a variety of threats.

“The loss of any animal is heartbreaking to the Columbus Zoo’s devoted animal care and animal health teams, particularly two whose births were as anticipated as these giraffe calves’. Despite the sad outcome, I am proud of our caring professionals for the great measures they took to try to save both Ubumwe, as well as Cami’s calf. Many animals, including giraffe calves, are extremely vulnerable when they are born—both in their native range and in human care. While we certainly understand the potential challenges, our team remains proactive, vigilant, and prepared to assist Cami however necessary. We are grateful for both the outpouring of support from giraffe fans around the world, as well as from our professional conservation community, as we continue our commitment to working to protect the future of wildlife,” said Columbus Zoo and Aquarium President/CEO Tom Stalf.

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species™, giraffe populations overall are listed as vulnerable in their native range across southern and eastern Africa, with several giraffe subspecies being listed as endangered. Giraffe populations are in decline due to various factors, including habitat loss, civil unrest/military operations, poaching and ecological changes.

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is a long-time supporter of several direct giraffe conservation initiatives and has raised a total of $191,825 for giraffe projects since 2002. The Zoo also provided a one-time $56,679 grant to the Giraffe Conservation Foundation through the Zoo’s Wine for Wildlife Fund-A-Need.

Additionally, the Columbus Zoo and the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado are the co-founders of the giraffe plasma bank and, along with several other collaborating zoos, work to consistently collect plasma from giraffe to send to animals in need of a transfusion.

With its mission to lead and inspire by connecting people and wildlife, the Zoo also remains committed to engaging the public to help increase awareness about these species and the actions we can all take to help protect them.

Columbus Zoo Mourns Loss of Giraffe After Rare Cesarean Section

Powell, OH – The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is saddened to report the loss of Masai giraffe, Cami, four days after a Cesarean section. Cami, who was monitored around the clock by the Zoo’s animal care experts, collapsed at approximately 1 a.m. and was unable to rise. The veterinary team immobilized her to assess her condition and provide fluids, but she passed a short time later. Initial bloodwork suggested acute kidney failure, but a full necropsy will be conducted with pathology results expected in approximately six weeks.

Cesarean sections in giraffes are extremely rare and typically conducted as a last resort during a difficult delivery due to the high risks involved in putting giraffes under anesthesia and successful recovery. There are only three documented reports of a giraffe dam surviving a Cesarean section, none of which occurred in North America.

Cami began to exhibit signs of labor around 3 p.m. on December 4 in a behind-the-scenes area of the Heart of Africa region at the Columbus Zoo. As Cami’s labor progressed, it became evident that the calf was presenting rear hooves first. Giraffe calves are typically born front hooves first, and it is extremely rare for calves to survive after being born rear hooves first.

In order to do everything possible to save both mom and baby, the decision was made to intervene. The Zoo’s animal care team, as well as a large animal surgeon from The Ohio State University, attempted to manually extract the calf from Cami without success. They then performed an emergency Cesarean section. After the calf was removed, the veterinary team found that the calf had serious congenital defects and thus would not have survived even if it had been born front hooves first.

Cami, a 6-year-old female Masai giraffe, came to the Columbus Zoo in 2013 from the Nashville Zoo. Father, Enzi, is the 8-year-old breeding male Masai giraffe, and he arrived at the Columbus Zoo in 2013 after first being at The Wilds and the Toledo Zoo, where he was born. The pairing of Enzi with Cami was based on a breeding recommendation from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP) for giraffes.

The loss of Cami and her calf follows the loss of another Masai giraffe, Zuri’s calf, Ubumwe, who sadly passed away on the morning of November 17. Ubumwe was born on October 30, 2018, and along with Zuri, was monitored around the clock by the animal care team. While regular wellness checks conducted by the animal health team had previously shown that she was growing and developing appropriately, Ubumwe’s behavior and appearance began to change on November 16, and her health suddenly deteriorated. The Zoo’s team of animal care professionals responded quickly, and aggressive treatment and diagnostics, including a CT, were performed to rule out potential causes of her gastrointestinal discomfort. Specialists from The Ohio State University were also available to conduct a comprehensive abdominal ultrasound and review the CT images. Despite intensive overnight care and some improvement in her clinical appearance, Ubumwe unfortunately passed away at approximately 8:30 a.m. At this time, the definitive cause of her death is still unknown until a full pathology report is received. However, there is no indication that the cause of Ubumwe’s passing was related to Cami’s health challenges after her difficult delivery and subsequent Cesarean section, or the passing of her calf, who had severe congenital defects. Zuri has returned to the herd and is doing well.

Nineteen giraffes had previously been born at the Columbus Zoo over the course of its history before the arrivals of Cami’s and Zuri’s late calves. The two most recent giraffe births are the first to have occurred in the Heart of Africa region since its opening in 2014. Giraffes typically have a gestation period of around 15 months and will give birth to the calf while standing up. Newborn calves can weigh anywhere from 100-150 pounds and are, on average, around 6 feet tall. According to the Association of Zoos and Aquarium, the mortality rate for giraffe calves in human care is about 25 percent while the mortality rate for giraffe calves in their native range is over 50 percent. Scientists also estimate that only a quarter of giraffe calves reach adulthood in their native ranges due to a variety of threats.

“Our devoted team is truly devastated but continues to be lifted by the outpouring of concern and support we have received from giraffe lovers from around the world. The Columbus Zoo’s animal care experts made heroic efforts to try and save Cami and the calves. Every individual animal in our care is extremely important not only to us, but to their species, and as giraffe populations are declining rapidly in their native ranges, it is up to all of us to help protect them. Working to help vulnerable species like giraffes comes with both triumphant and heartbreaking moments, and even during this sad time, I am proud of the Columbus Zoo’s work on behalf of animals in our care as well as our continued commitment to the conservation of giraffes in Africa,” said Columbus Zoo and Aquarium President/CEO Tom Stalf.

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species™, giraffe populations overall are listed as vulnerable in their native range across southern and eastern Africa, with several giraffe subspecies being listed as endangered. Giraffe populations are in decline due to various factors, including habitat loss, civil unrest/military operations, poaching and ecological changes.

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is a long-time supporter of several direct giraffe conservation initiatives and has raised a total of $191,825 for giraffe projects since 2002. The Zoo also provided a one-time $56,679 grant to the Giraffe Conservation Foundation through the Zoo’s Wine for Wildlife Fund-A-Need.

Additionally, the Columbus Zoo and the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado are the co-founders of the giraffe plasma bank and, along with several other collaborating zoos, work to consistently collect plasma from giraffe to send to animals in need of a transfusion.

With its mission to lead and inspire by connecting people and wildlife, the Zoo also remains committed to engaging the public to help increase awareness about these species and the actions we can all take to help protect them.

About the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Home to more than 10,000 animals representing over 600 species from around the globe, the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium leads and inspires by connecting people and wildlife. The Zoo complex is a recreational and education destination that includes the 22-acre Zoombezi Bay water park and 18-hole Safari Golf Course. The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium also manages The Wilds, a 10,000-acre conservation center and safari park located in southeastern Ohio. The Zoo is a regional attraction with global impact; annually contributing more than $4 million of privately raised funds to support conservation projects worldwide. A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, the Columbus Zoo has earned Charity Navigator’s prestigious 4-star rating.

CSO to Perform Winning Compositions from First-Ever SCORE! Competition at Free Happy Hour Concert January 9

The Columbus Symphony named six original works by composers with Ohio ties as the first winners of its innovative, new composition competition in collaboration with the Johnstone Fund for New Music—SCORE with the Columbus Symphony!

Launched in the summer of 2018, SCORE! strives to support and feature the compositional talent of Ohio. Of the 55 original compositions submitted by composers originally from Ohio, current residents of Ohio, current students in Ohio, or graduates of an Ohio university, six were selected by a panel of judges that included CSO Music Director Rossen Milanov.

In a special SCORE! Happy Hour concert, Maestro Milanov will conduct the Columbus Symphony in performing these six winning compositions:

  1. Title: “Discord” Composer: Nabil Abad Ohio connection: Current student at Baldwin Wallace Conservatory of Music (Berea, Ohio)
  2. Title: “Impulse” Composer: Martin Hebel Ohio connection: Graduate of University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music
  3. Title: “Vinyl” Composer: Charles Peck Ohio connection: Graduate of University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music
  4. Title: “Andromeda” Composer: Ramsey Sadaka Ohio connection: Graduate of The Ohio State University, Ohio native, resident of New Albany
  5. Title: “Flashing Lights” Composer: Jiří Trtík Ohio connection: Current student at Cleveland Institute of Music
  6. Title: “Blooming in Winter’s Long Dark Night” Composer: Meng Wang Ohio connection: Student at University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music

The Columbus Symphony presents SCORE! Happy Hour at the Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.) on Wednesday, January 9. Doors will open at 6 p.m. with complimentary appetizers, drink specials, and the opportunity to meet CSO musicians and the featured composers. The concert begins at 7 p.m. and will last for approximately 90 minutes with no intermission. Admission is free. Seating is general admission.

CALENDAR LISTING

The CSO presents SCORE! HAPPY HOUR

Wednesday, January 9, 7 p.m.

Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.)

In a special free Happy Hour concert, CSO Music Director Rossen Milanov and the Columbus Symphony will perform six original compositions selected as the first winners of its innovative new competition—SCORE with the Columbus Symphony! The selected compositions were written by composers either originally from Ohio, current residents of Ohio, current students in Ohio, or graduates of an Ohio university. Doors will open at 6pm with complimentary appetizers, drink specials, and the opportunity to meet CSO musicians and the featured composers. The concert begins at 7pm and will last for approximately 90 minutes with no intermission. Admission is free. Seating is general admission.

The 2017-18 season is made possible in part by state tax dollars allocated by the Ohio Legislature to the Ohio Arts Council (OAC). The OAC is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally, and economically. The CSO also appreciates the support of the Greater Columbus Arts Council, supporting the city’s artists and arts organizations since 1973, and the Robert W. Stevenson, Preston Davis, and Kenneth L. Coe and Jack Barrow funds of The Columbus Foundation, assisting donors and others in strengthening our community for the benefit of all its citizens.

About the Columbus Symphony Orchestra

Founded in 1951, the Columbus Symphony is the longest-running, professional symphony in central Ohio. Through an array of innovative artistic, educational, and community outreach programming, the Columbus Symphony is reaching an expanding, more diverse audience each year. This season, the Columbus Symphony will share classical music with more than 175,000 people in central Ohio through concerts, radio broadcasts, and special programming. For more information, visit www.columbussymphony.com.

Ohio’s Superintendent Recognizes Next Round of Purple Star Schools

Dec. 7, 2018

In celebrations today at Eastwood High School (Wood County) and Whitehouse Primary School (Lucas County), State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria announced that 57 Ohio schools received the Purple Star designation for their commitment to serving military-connected students and their families.

“On this National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, we’re honored to recognize these schools for creating inclusive and supportive communities for their military families,” said Superintendent DeMaria. “Purple Star schools provide our military children and families with the resources they need to be successful. We’re thankful for their service and honored to continue the important work of improving services for Ohio’s military families.”

A few examples that demonstrate Eastwood High School’s commitment to creating a military-friendly school include an annual Veterans Day assembly, recognizing recently enlisted high school seniors during graduation with special honor cords and creating a Military Honor Wall, which identifies the contributions of veterans within the community.

Additionally, for the first time, two career-technical education centers received the designation: Warren County Career Center and Laurel Oaks Career Campus. The full list of schools that received the designation and more information on the Purple Star can be found online here.

The Purple Star designation for military-friendly schools recognizes schools that show a major commitment to serving students and families connected to our nation’s armed forces. The Purple Star Advisory Board, formed by the Ohio departments of Education, Higher Education, Veterans Services and Adjutant General, helps decide eligibility.

A Purple Star school will receive the designation for two years. After two years, the school must reapply. The Purple Star emblem was selected because purple symbolizes support for military families.

There are 34,000 children in Ohio with one or more parents serving in the military. This includes the children of active duty, reserve and Ohio National Guard members. Some of these children will attend six to nine different schools throughout their K-12 educational experiences. In addition to changing schools often, a student can be affected by a parent’s deployment. Schools can help students and families face these issues by connecting them with the resources they need.

About the Ohio Department of Education

The Ohio Department of Education oversees the state’s public education system, which includes public school districts, joint vocational school districts and charter schools. The Department also monitors educational service centers, other regional education providers, early learning and child care programs, and private schools. The Department’s tasks include administering the school funding system, collecting school fiscal and performance data, developing academic standards and model curricula, administering the state achievement tests, issuing district and school report cards, administering Ohio’s voucher programs, providing professional development, and licensing teachers, administrators, treasurers, superintendents and other education personnel. The Department is governed by the State Board of Education with administration of the Department the responsibility of the superintendent of public instruction.

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OHIO NEWS

Staff Reports