SAG Nominations revealed


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This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Bradley Cooper, left, and Lady Gaga in a scene from "A Star is Born." The cast was nominated for a SAG Award for best ensemble. The SAG Awards will be held Jan. 27 and broadcast live by TNT and TBS. This year's show will honor Alan Alda with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. (Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)

This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Bradley Cooper, left, and Lady Gaga in a scene from "A Star is Born." The cast was nominated for a SAG Award for best ensemble. The SAG Awards will be held Jan. 27 and broadcast live by TNT and TBS. This year's show will honor Alan Alda with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. (Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)


Presenters Laverne Cox, left, and Awkwafina announce nominations for the 25th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at the Pacific Design Center on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, in West Hollywood, Calif. The show will be held on Sunday, Jan. 27, 2019, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)


This image released by Disney shows Lupita Nyong'o, from left, Chadwick Boseman and Letitia Wright in a scene from "Black Panther." The cast was nominated for a SAG Award for best ensemble. The SAG Awards will be held Jan. 27 and broadcast live by TNT and TBS. This year's show will honor Alan Alda with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. (Disney via AP)


‘A Star Is Born’ tops SAG Awards nominations, snubs abound

By JAKE COYLE

Thursday, December 13

NEW YORK (AP) — “A Star Is Born” led nominations for the 25th Screen Actors Guild Awards with four nods including best ensemble on Wednesday, firmly establishing Bradley Cooper’s romantic revival as this year’s Academy Awards front runner.

In nominations announced in West Hollywood, Calif., the actors guild — one of the most predictive bellwethers of the Oscars — threw cold water on the awards campaigns of numerous contenders while elevating others. But “A Star Is Born” fared the best of all, landing nominations for Cooper (best male actor), Lady Gaga (best female actor) and Sam Elliott (best supporting male actor).

The other nominees for the group’s top award, best ensemble, were: “Black Panther,” ”Bohemian Rhapsody,” ”BlacKkKlansman” and “Crazy Rich Asians.”

That category is the most closely watched because only once in the last two decades has the eventual Oscars best picture winner not been nominated for best ensemble at the SAG Awards. The one aberration, though, was last year, when Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” overcame the SAG omission on its way to winning best picture.

Unless a new trend is forming, that’s worrisome news for Oscar hopefuls like “Vice,” Adam McKay’s Dick Cheney biopic (which led last week’s Golden Globe nominations); Alfonso Cuaron’s Netflix drama “Roma” (the overwhelming choice of critics groups); and the 1962 road trip “Green Book.”

“Vice” still scored SAG nods for Christian Bale and Amy Adams, just as “Green Book” won nominations for Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali.

But “Roma” was shut out entirely, as was Damien Chazelle’s Neil Armstrong drama “First Man” and Barry Jenkins’ Harlem love story “If Beale Street Could Talk.” Most expected Regina King of “Beale Street” to be among the supporting female actor nominees.

Instead, Wednesday’s nominations gave an unlikely boost to “Bohemian Rhapsody,” the Freddie Mercury biopic that has been a hit with audiences but was slammed by critics. Despite being widely viewed as a riveting one-man show by Rami Malek, the film ended up nominated for its ensemble cast. Malek was also nominated for best actor.

The screen actors appeared to favor big ticket sellers over smaller independent ensembles.

Ryan Coogler’s comic-book sensation “Black Panther” also landed a nomination for its stunt ensemble team. Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman” scored nods for both John David Washington and Adam Driver. “Crazy Rich Asians” co-star Awkwafina, a presenter Wednesday morning, has the unusual pleasure of announcing the hit romantic comedy’s ensemble nomination. “It was all me,” she joked.

Yorgos Lanthimos’ period romp “The Favourite” failed to crack best ensemble, but its three leads — Olivia Colman, Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone — were all nominated, as expected. Stone added a second nod for her performance in the Netflix miniseries “Maniac.”

Emily Blunt also scored two nominations herself: one for her lead performance in “Mary Poppins Returns” and one for her supporting role in “A Quiet Place.” The other best female performance nominees alongside Blunt, Lady Gaga and Colman were Glenn Close (“The Wife”) and Melissa McCarthy (“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”)

Blunt’s nomination for “A Quiet Place” was among the nominations’ many surprises, as was Margot Robbie’s supporting turn as Queen Elizabeth in “Mary Queen of Scots.”

Timothee Chalamet (“Call Me By Your Name”) scored his second straight SAG nomination for his supporting performance in the addiction drama “Beautiful Boy.” Rounding out the category alongside Ali, Driver and Elliott was Richard E. Grant for “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Usually, about 15 of the SAG’s 20 individual acting nominees line up exactly with the eventual Oscar field.

In television categories, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and “Ozark” led with four nominations each. “Barry,” ”GLOW,” ”The Handmaid’s Tale” and “The Kominsky Method” trailed close behind with three nominations each.

Up for best ensemble in comedy are “Atlanta,” ”Barry,” ”GLOW,” ”The Kominsky Method” and “The Marvelous Mrs Maisel.” The drama series ensemble nominees went to: “The Americans,” ”Better Call Saul,” ”The Haidmaid’s Tale,” ”Ozark” and “This Is Us.”

Though Netflix was nearly shut out on the film side (its lone nomination was for the stunt ensemble of “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs”), it dominated the television categories with 15 total nods.

The SAG Awards will be held Jan. 27 and broadcast live by TNT and TBS. This year’s show will honor Alan Alda with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award.

The ceremony will be hosted by actress Megan Mullally, the guild announced Wednesday. The previous SAG Awards, when Kristen Bell emceed, was the first time the broadcast was hosted.

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

CSO’s RUSSIAN WINTER FESTIVAL II to Feature Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto January 11 & 12

The celebration of Russian composers continues as CSO Music Director Rossen Milanov and the musicians of the Columbus Symphony present a program that juxtaposes Tchaikovsky’s passionate, romantic music against Prokofiev’s bold symphonic tableaux. The program includes the Suite from Tchaikovsky’s The Sleeping Beauty as well as his Piano Concerto No. 1 featuring special guest pianist Sergei Babayan. The performance will conclude with Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5.

The Columbus Symphony presents the Russian Winter Festival II: Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto at the Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.) on Friday and Saturday, January 11 and 12, at 8pm. Tickets start at $10 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.columbussymphony.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. The CAPA Ticket Center will also be open two hours prior to each performance.

Prelude – Patrons are invited to join WOSU’s Christopher Purdy in the theatre at 7pm for a 30-minute, pre-concert discussion about the works to be performed.

Postlude – Directly following the performance, patrons are invited to stay for a talk-back with Maestro Milanov and pianist Sergei Babayan.

Friday Coffee Dress – Friday, January 11, 10am, Ohio Theatre

Experience a working rehearsal prior to that evening’s opening-night performance. Seating is general admission for this 2.5-hour, open rehearsal, offering a behind-the-scenes look at the fine tuning and preparation behind a Masterworks main stage performance. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.columbussymphony.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. Admission includes coffee and light fare.

About CSO Music Director Rossen Milanov

Respected and admired by audiences and musicians alike, Rossen Milanov is currently the music director of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra (CSO), Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, Princeton Symphony Orchestra, and the Orquesta Sinfónica del Principado de Asturias (OSPA) in Spain.

In 2017, Milanov received an Arts Prize from The Columbus Foundation for presenting Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony as part of CSO’s 2017 Picnic with the Pops summer series. Under his leadership, the organization has expanded its reach by connecting original programming with community-wide initiatives, such as focusing on women composers and nature conservancy, presenting original festivals, and supporting and commissioning new music.

Milanov has collaborated with some of the world’s preeminent artists, including Yo-Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Joshua Bell, Midori, Christian Tetzlaff, and André Watts. During his 11-year tenure with The Philadelphia Orchestra, he conducted more than 200 performances. In 2015, he completed a 15-year tenure as music director of nationally recognized training orchestra Symphony in C in New Jersey. In 2013, he wrapped up a 17-year tenure with the New Symphony Orchestra in his native city of Sofia, Bulgaria. His passion for new music has resulted in numerous world premieres of works by composers such as Derek Bermel, Mason Bates, Caroline Shaw, Phillip Glass, Richard Danielpour, Nicolas Maw, and Gabriel Prokofiev, among others.

Noted for his versatility, Milanov is also a welcomed presence in the worlds of opera and ballet. He has collaborated with Komische Oper Berlin for Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mtzensk), Opera Oviedo for the Spanish premiere of Tchaikovsky’s Mazzepa and Bartok’s Bluebeard’s Castle (awarded best Spanish production for 2015), and Opera Columbus for Verdi’s La Traviata.

An experienced ballet conductor, he has been seen at New York City Ballet and collaborated with some of the best-known choreographers of our time, such Mats Ek, Benjamin Millepied, and most recently, Alexei Ratmansky in the critically acclaimed revival of Swan Lake in Zurich with the Zurich Ballet, and in Paris with La Scala Ballet.

About guest pianist Sergei Babayan

Hailed for his emotional intensity, bold energy, and remarkable levels of color, Sergei Babayan brings a deep understanding and insight to an exceptionally diverse repertoire. Le Figaro has praised his “unequaled touch, perfectly harmonious phrasing and breathtaking virtuosity.” Le Devoir from Montreal put it simply, “Sergei Babayan is a genius. Period.” Babayan has collaborated with such conductors as David Robertson, Neeme Järvi, Yuri Temirkanov, Thomas Dausgaard, Tugan Sokhiev, and Dima Slobodeniouk among others. Over the years, he has performed with Valery Gergiev numerous times to great critical acclaim, including appearances at the International Festival “Stars of the White Nights,” the Moscow Easter Festival, the Barbican Centre with Mo. Gergiev conducting the London Symphony Orchestra, in St. Petersburg’s Mariinsky Theatre, the Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory, Théâtre des Champs-Elyseés in Paris, at the Salzburg Festival, and at the Rotterdam Philharmonic-Gergiev Festival where Babayan was artist-in-residence.

About composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-93)

Tchaikovksy was a Russian composer of the romantic period, whose works are among the most popular music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, bolstered by his appearances as a guest conductor in Europe and the US. He was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III and awarded a lifetime pension.

The Sleeping Beauty is a ballet in a prologue and three acts, first performed in 1890. Completed by Tchaikovsky in 1889, it is the second of his three ballets. The premiere performance took place at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg on January 15, 1890 and has since become one of the classical repertoire’s most famous ballets.

The Piano Concerto No. 1 was composed by Tchaikovsky between November 1874 and February 1875. It was revised in the summer of 1879 and again in December 1888. The first version received heavy criticism from Nikolai Rubinstein, Tchaikovsky’s desired pianist. Rubinstein later repudiated his previous accusations and became a fervent champion of the work.

About composer Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)

Russian Soviet composer, pianist, and conductor Sergei Prokofiev is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century. He created – excluding juvenilia – seven completed operas, seven symphonies, eight ballets, five piano concertos, two violin concertos, a cello concerto, a symphony-concerto for cello and orchestra, and nine completed piano sonatas.

Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. 5 in one month during the summer of 1944 in Soviet Russia. Fourteen years had passed since he wrote the first version of his Symphony No. 4. World War II was still raging during the symphony’s gestation, and Prokofiev composed it in the Soviet Union. He gave out in a statement at the time that he intended it as “a hymn to free and happy Man, to his mighty powers, his pure and noble spirit.” He added “I cannot say that I deliberately chose this theme. It was born in me and clamored for expression. The music matured within me. It filled my soul.”

www.columbussymphony.com

CALENDAR LISTING

The Columbus Symphony presents RUSSIAN WINTER FESTIVAL II: TCHAIKOVSKY’S PIANO CONCERTO

Friday & Saturday, January 11 & 12, 8 pm

Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.)

The celebration of Russian composers continues as CSO Music Director Rossen Milanov and the musicians of the Columbus Symphony present a program that juxtaposes Tchaikovsky’s passionate, romantic music against Prokofiev’s bold symphonic tableaux. The program includes the Suite from Tchaikovsky’s The Sleeping Beauty as well as his Piano Concerto No. 1 featuring special guest pianist Sergei Babayan. The performance will conclude with Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5. Tickets start at $10 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.columbussymphony.com, or by phone at (614) 228-8600 or (800) 745-3000. www.columbussymphony.com

The 2018-19 season is made possible in part by state tax dollars allocated by the Ohio Legislature to the Ohio Arts Council (OAC). The OAC is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally, and economically. The CSO also appreciates the support of the Greater Columbus Arts Council, supporting the city’s artists and arts organizations since 1973, and the Kenneth L. Coe and Jack Barrow, and Mr. and Mrs. Derrol R. Johnson funds of The Columbus Foundation, assisting donors and others in strengthening our community for the benefit of all its citizens.

About the Columbus Symphony Orchestra

Founded in 1951, the Columbus Symphony is the only full-time, professional symphony in central Ohio. Through an array of innovative artistic, educational, and community outreach programming, the Columbus Symphony is reaching an expanding, more diverse audience each year. This season, the Columbus Symphony will share classical music with more than 200,000 people in central Ohio through concerts, radio broadcasts, and special programming. For more information, visit www.columbussymphony.com.

2018’s top movie moments, from ‘Shallow’ to ‘The Shining’

By LINDSEY BAHR

AP Film Writer

Thursday, December 13

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A film doesn’t have to be great to have a great moment.

They’re not mutually exclusive of course, but a great movie moment is something more ephemeral — a few minutes of pure, inexplicable joy, or even jaw-dropping disbelief that you want to revisit immediately. It’s the kind of scene you fast-forward to, the kind you want to re-watch with friends and family, the kind that becomes a meme.

Here we look at some of our favorite movie moments from 2018 that stayed with us long after the credits rolled.

Possible spoilers may follow.

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ALLY TAKES THE STAGE IN “A STAR IS BORN”

Surely literal goosebumps are a good sign that you’ve just seen a pretty stunning movie moment. That’s what happens every time I watch the electric “Shallow” scene in “A Star Is Born,” and, specifically where Lady Gaga’s Ally takes a deep breath and walks out on stage to join Bradley Cooper’s Jackson Maine and sing her song in front of thousands of people.

PAST AND PRESENT MEET IN “MAMMA MIA! HERE WE GO AGAIN”

Ok, so “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” might barely qualify as a movie, but it has enough smile-inducing moments to give it a pass. Plus, is there a more enjoyable ending of a movie this year than when the young and old versions of all the characters meet up to sing and dance to “Super Trouper”? A little voice in your head might be asking: Are they all dead? And why is there so much metallic fabric in heaven? But then Pierce Brosnan, Stellan Skarsgard and Colin Firth emerge from below a bar, beer in hand and tops zipped down to their belly buttons and logical inquiry just sort of drifts away.

RECREATING “THE SHINING” IN “READY PLAYER ONE”

In a film full of fanboy indulgences and movie nostalgia, Steven Spielberg got to geek out with his own idol, Stanley Kubrick, by recreating “The Shining’s” Overlook hotel in “Ready Player One” and put his own spin on it. Spielberg would never let homage get in the way of his own storytelling, though, so he settles for a brief wink instead of a full on rehash.

KILLMONGER CHALLENGES T’CHALLA IN “BLACK PANTHER”

It’s not often that you find yourself really wondering what is going to happen in a major superhero movie, but “Black Panther” kept audiences guessing and no more so than in one of the tensest and most exciting scenes of the year, when Michael B. Jordan’s Erik Killmonger — one of the year’s greatest movie villains — challenges Chadwick Boseman’s T’Challa for the throne, disarming the sitting ruler first with his words before they fight for the kingdom.

POOL PARTY IN “EIGHTH GRADE”

Is there anything more uncomfortable than a middle school pool party? How about one you were only invited to because a popular girl’s mom has a crush on your dad? That’s what Kayla (Elsie Fisher) is contending with in Bo Burnham’s “Eighth Grade.” Burnham’s camera puts the audience right there with Kayla, as she makes her way through the house and to the carnival of souls outside, and we’re left to only cringe and root for her through every agonizing moment.

EXPLAINING HARRY POTTER GANG THEORY IN “THE HATE U GIVE”

“The Hate U Give” is a drama, no doubt, but there are some moments of wonderful, heartfelt levity that audiences might not realize from just the logline or trailer alone. In fact some of the best scenes are the lighter ones, including the moment where Starr Carter’s (Amandla Stenberg) no-nonsense dad, Mav Carter (Russell Hornsby) explains how the Hogwarts houses are like gangs.

JAILHOUSE SPIRIT IN “PADDINGTON 2”

The enormously kind bear from Darkest Peru meets one of his greatest challenges when he ends up in the slammer with some unsavory cell block mates, but a little marmalade magic in the kitchen raises everyone’s spirits, even Brendan Gleeson’s Knuckles McGinty.

EDDIE BROCK EATS A LOBSTER IN “VENOM”

Was anyone more fully, totally committed to such a bizarre character this year as Tom Hardy was as Eddie Brock/Venom? Look no further than the so-out-there-it-works scene where, ravenously hungry, Eddie jumps into a live lobster tank at a fancy restaurant and takes a bite out of one of the crustaceans. It’s an image I wish I could forget, actually, and yet…

BASTIAN GETS BLOODY IN “GAME NIGHT”

Olivia the West Highland White Terrier solidified her star status in “Widows,” but her breakout role was just earlier this year as Jesse Plemons’ dog, Bastian, in “Game Night,” where she has the misfortune to be in the same room as a bleeding Max (Jason Bateman), one of the funnier moments of the year. Max notices his blood dripping onto the snowy white pup and tries to scrub it off with water. This of course just makes the little Westie pink and wet and itching to shake.

MOTHERHOOD MONTAGE IN “TULLY”

Pump. Feed. Change the diaper. Dispose of the diaper. Repeat. Jason Reitman and star Charlize Theron go through the monotonous repetition of life with a newborn in a wonderfully conceived montage in “Tully.” It is funny, and dark and true. Because sometimes you’re just so tired, you accidentally drop your phone on your baby.

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And an honorable mention for a few movie moments that became memes: “I just wanted to take another look at you,” from “A Star Is Born”; “Mr. Stark, I don’t feel so good,” from “Avengers: Infinity War”; Henry Cavill gets ready to fight in “Mission: Impossible —Fallout.”

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Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

Dublin Women’s Philanthropic Club to honor local business owner Jamie Mollwitz at January “Boots, Bourbon and Beer” fundraiser

DUBLIN, OHIO (Dec. 10, 2018) Dublin Women’s Philanthropic Club announced today that it will honor local historic Dublin business owner Jamie Mollwitz at the club’s “Boots, Bourbon and Beer” fundraising event on Saturday, Jan. 26, 2019 from 7 to 11 p.m. at the Country Club at Muirfield Village, 8715 Muirfield Dr., in Dublin, Ohio.

Mollwitz is the owner of boutique Boho 72, an apparel and gift boutique in the heart of historic Dublin. She gives back to more than 30 causes per year through donations and hosts approximately 15 after-hours events per year at her location, raising hundreds of dollars for organizations such as breast cancer charities, homeless shelters, mental health support organizations and local schools.

Mollwitz and her staff are deeply connected to Dublin, often sharing information and recommendations about the community with visitors and new residents. She is dedicated to giving back to her customers who also give so much to enrich the community and each other’s lives.

“I want to be supportive and empower women to feel good about themselves,” said Mollwitz. “We help dress women for their body type and we are happy that they trust us to help them feel comfortable and confident. I want to provide a no-pressure atmosphere where people can shop, unwind, feel comfortable and trust our staff with some local retail therapy when they need it.”

Mollwitz was born into a family of entrepreneurs in Wisconsin, north of Milwaukee. She is married to her husband, Bob, and has been a Dublin resident for 32 years. Her daughter, Clair (Salter) Mills, is her business partner. She also has a son, P.J. Salter, and three grandchildren. Mollwitz is a graduate of Otterbein University in Westerville, with degrees in Human Resources and Business Administration.

“We are delighted to honor such a deserving member of the community,” said Boots, Bourbon and Beer Co-Chairperson Pam Stein. “Jamie is a wonderful example of a dedicated small business owner who gives back.”

The evening will feature a live auction, tapas, a cash bourbon tasting and line dancing. Event proceeds benefit Dublin Women’s Philanthropic Club’s grants and scholarship programs, including grants to women who are overcoming obstacles to continue their education. Dublin Women’s Philanthropic Club is a nonprofit organization of nearly 100 women, founded in 1978 and dedicated to philanthropy in the areas of higher education and supporting families and women in times of crisis or need.

Tickets are now on sale for $75 per person. For more information, visit http://dublinwomensclub.com/ or contact Co-Chairpersons Pam Stein, pamlstein@gmail.com, 614-678-9148; or Jennifer Lambright, jklambright@gmail.com, 816-805-7154. Corporate sponsorships are also available. For more information, please contact Sharon Zimmers, sharonzimmers@yahoo.com.

This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Bradley Cooper, left, and Lady Gaga in a scene from "A Star is Born." The cast was nominated for a SAG Award for best ensemble. The SAG Awards will be held Jan. 27 and broadcast live by TNT and TBS. This year’s show will honor Alan Alda with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. (Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/12/web1_121952684-d8458058ecf949fc97a04ecc1df68a13.jpgThis image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Bradley Cooper, left, and Lady Gaga in a scene from "A Star is Born." The cast was nominated for a SAG Award for best ensemble. The SAG Awards will be held Jan. 27 and broadcast live by TNT and TBS. This year’s show will honor Alan Alda with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. (Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)

Presenters Laverne Cox, left, and Awkwafina announce nominations for the 25th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at the Pacific Design Center on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, in West Hollywood, Calif. The show will be held on Sunday, Jan. 27, 2019, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/12/web1_121952684-154f885685954f19b6168c11b24c54aa.jpgPresenters Laverne Cox, left, and Awkwafina announce nominations for the 25th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at the Pacific Design Center on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, in West Hollywood, Calif. The show will be held on Sunday, Jan. 27, 2019, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

This image released by Disney shows Lupita Nyong’o, from left, Chadwick Boseman and Letitia Wright in a scene from "Black Panther." The cast was nominated for a SAG Award for best ensemble. The SAG Awards will be held Jan. 27 and broadcast live by TNT and TBS. This year’s show will honor Alan Alda with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. (Disney via AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/12/web1_121952684-9c43d19eca74411980422b4cb86933bd.jpgThis image released by Disney shows Lupita Nyong’o, from left, Chadwick Boseman and Letitia Wright in a scene from "Black Panther." The cast was nominated for a SAG Award for best ensemble. The SAG Awards will be held Jan. 27 and broadcast live by TNT and TBS. This year’s show will honor Alan Alda with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. (Disney via AP)
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