A new ‘force’ in fencing?


Sports, exploration

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In this Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019, photo, Julien Esprit, left, competes with Jean Baptiste Marchetti-Waternaux during a national lightsaber tournament in Beaumont-sur-Oise, north of Paris. In France, it is easier than ever now to act out "Star Wars" fantasies. The fencing federation has officially recognized lightsaber dueling as a competitive sport. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

In this Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019, photo, Julien Esprit, left, competes with Jean Baptiste Marchetti-Waternaux during a national lightsaber tournament in Beaumont-sur-Oise, north of Paris. In France, it is easier than ever now to act out "Star Wars" fantasies. The fencing federation has officially recognized lightsaber dueling as a competitive sport. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)


Fencing body ‘interested’ in France’s embrace of lightsaber

Tuesday, February 19

PARIS (AP) — The international governing body of fencing is giving a qualified thumbs-up to France’s embrace of lightsaber duels.

The Associated Press reported this week on the growth of lightsaber dueling in France, after the French fencing federation gave the nascent sport its official blessing.

The International Fencing Federation, or FIE, said Tuesday that although it doesn’t include lightsaber fencing as one of its official disciplines, it is “interested in how this new event progresses.”

Responding to AP questions sent two weeks ago, federation official Serge Timacheff said the FIE has been in touch with France’s federation about lightsaber events, rules, and equipment.

By email, Timacheff said: “We are always watching new trends in swordplay, and we are interested in observing the development and adoption of it in the French Fencing Federation.”

QB coach brings familiar face for Rodgers on Packers’ staff

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — When Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers gets ready for his 15th season, he’ll be working with a new coach and offensive coordinator.

Plus, for the first time in his career, he’ll be directing a new offense.

At least there will be a constant for the 35-year-old quarterback: the return of Luke Getsy as quarterbacks coach.

A quality control coach in 2014 and 2015 and receivers coach in 2016 and 2017, Getsy spent last season as offensive coordinator and receivers coach at Mississippi State. His presence should ease the adjustments for the two-time MVP.

“You’ve got to earn people’s trust, show them how much you care before they’re going to care about you and want to do well for you,” Getsy said on Monday as the team introduced the staff of new coach Matt LaFleur.

“I think that phase is probably going to just happen quicker, naturally, being here for four years and creating a relationship. That part of it makes the transition much easier.

“Installing a new offense and the new principles and all that stuff, we’ve got a lot of work to do. We’re going to rely on the relationship as far as the mutual trust, respect we have for each other, but we’ve got a lot of work to do to get him to dive into this offense fully and being able to function at a high level.”

LaFleur said that Getsy’s history with the team was another reason for his hiring.

“Certainly, we’re going to find the best quarterback coach that’s out there,” LaFleur said. “Some things that I really did like about Luke was the fact that he played quarterback in college. I reached out not only to Aaron, but a couple other guys with him being in the building before, just to find out what they thought of him as a man and as a coach, and everybody gave him a thumbs-up.”

Rodgers’ introduction into the new offense can’t start until the beginning of the offseason program on April 1.

There’s a lot for the new coaching staff to do before the players return in six weeks, including preparation for the scouting combine, which begins later this month.

LaFleur, Getsy and offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett all will have input in the quarterbacks room. Making sure they’re delivering the same message to Rodgers and fellow quarterbacks DeShone Kizer and Tim Boyle will be key.

“We’ve got three quarterback guys that are going to be hitting him from all angles,” LaFleur said. “I know that I need to be in that room as much as I possibly can because I am going to be the play-caller. I think that relationship between the play-caller and the quarterback is absolutely critical. I don’t foresee ever missing a quarterback meeting.”

Getsy arrives at the change with a unique perspective. He spent four seasons teaching former coach Mike McCarthy’s playbook. Now, he’s spent a few weeks learning LaFleur’s playbook. Getsy said terminology will be the biggest change for Rodgers.

“It has the West Coast roots. The backbone is what he’s comfortable,” Getsy said. “The timing, the rhythm and all that stuff that he’s really, really good at, I think that’s all there.

“The principles are there. It’s just speaking the language. That’ll be the biggest thing — for everybody — because there’s a lot of people in this building that have been here a while and have been ingrained in the previous terminology.”

Notes: LaFleur finalized his staff on Monday by promoting Chris Gizzi to strength and conditioning coordinator and retaining Mark Lovat, Thadeus Jackson and Grant Thorne as assistants. Gizzi spent the past five seasons working under Lovat, who had been the coordinator since 2010. “That is a critical hire,” LaFleur said. “You talk about the guys that are going to talk to the team the most, it’s going to myself, it’s going to be the special teams coordinator and it’s going to be the strength coach. Those three positions are absolutely critical to our success moving forward.”

More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

The Conversation

Farewell, Opportunity: rover dies, but its hugely successful Mars mission is helping us design the next one

February 15, 2019

Author: Andrew Coates, Professor of Physics, Deputy Director (Solar System) at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UCL

Disclosure statement: Andrew Coates receives funding from UKSA and STFC (UK). He is Principal Investigator for the PanCam instrument on the ESA-Russia ExoMars 2020 rover, now called Rosalind Franklin. The PanCam team includes the UK, Germany, Switzerland, Austria and an international science team.

Partners: University College London provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation UK.

NASA’s Opportunity rover on Mars has been officially pronounced dead. Its amazingly successful mission lasted nearly 15 years, well beyond its initial three-month goal. Opportunity provided the first proof that water once existed on Mars and shaped its surface, a crucial piece of knowledge informing both current and future missions.

Opportunity landed on the red planet on January 25, 2004, and was last heard from on June 10, 2018, when a huge dust storm reduced light levels there significantly. This prevented the rover from using its solar panels to charge its batteries. The solar panels had already started to degrade due to the longer than expected mission, and the low light levels and the build up of dust may have caused its ultimate demise.

The rover has driven over 45km on the Martian surface despite being designed to travel for just 1km – an interplanetary record. Lasting almost 60 times its expected lifetime, it is an incredible achievement for space exploration. The mission is therefore helping scientists design new rover missions including NASA’s Mars 2020 rover and the ExoMars 2020 rover that I work on, recently named “Rosalind Franklin” after the DNA pioneer.

Stunning science

The science from the Mars exploration rovers Spirit and Opportunity has been simply groundbreaking. For Opportunity, it started with landing by chance in a 22-metre wide crater called “Eagle” on an otherwise mainly flat plain – a space exploration “hole in one”. Immediately after landing, it spotted a layered rocky outcrop, similar to sedimentary rocks on Earth but never before seen on Mars. And because it was mobile, it could actually examine the rock composition directly after leaving the landing platform.

By illuminating the rocks with radioactive sources, the rover discovered the expected iron (effectively rust) that makes Mars’ surface reddish brown, along with other metals such as nickel and zinc. But it also found more volatile elements like bromine, chlorine and sulphur, which indicated that these rocks may have reacted with ancient water. Most excitingly, it detected the mineral “jarosite”, which is often seen in the outflow of acidic water from mining sites on Earth. This provided direct evidence that acidic water had been involved in the formation of Mars’ rocks 3.8-4 billion years ago.

The rover then moved out of the Eagle crater onto the flat, surrounding plain. In the first weeks, it discovered “blueberries” – millimetre-sized spheres of the mineral hematite. Although this could have formed due to volcanism or meteor impacts, analysis revealed that it most likely formed in water.

Opportunity later visited the spectacular Victoria crater, which is 750 metres in diameter and some 70 metres deep, with dunes on the crater floor. Remarkably, the rover and its tracks were imaged from orbit by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter near the crater rim. There was more hematite here, too, showing that this may have formed underground in water, before being brought to the surface when the crater formed via an impact.

Its next destination was the Endeavour crater, which is 22km in diameter and 300 metres deep. Here it also made a major discovery –- there were clays near the crater rim, which would have required fresh, abundant and non-acidic water for their formation. This was the first indication that Mars was actually habitable 3.8-4 billion years ago, containing drinkable as well as acidic water.

These main science results are key to our scientific exploration of Mars today. The question of habitability is being pursued further by the NASA Curiosity mission, which has already found evidence of a large, ancient lake on early Mars that contained organic matter by drilling into the mudstones that remain.

Digging deeper

Thanks to Opportunity, upcoming missions will look closer at the spots were ancient water flowed. NASA’s Mars 2020 rover will gather samples from Jezero crater, a location where orbiters have detected signs of an ancient river delta. These samples may be returned to Earth by a future international mission. Analysis in labs on Earth may ultimately answer the question of whether there is or ever was life on Mars, if we haven’t already.

Meanwhile, our Rosalind Franklin rover, a collaboration between the European Space Agency and Russia, is due for launch in 2020. It will land in March, 2021, at Oxia Planum, an elevated plain. Here, there are also signs of prolonged exposure to ancient water, clays and a river outflow channel.

Rosalind the rover will pick up where Opportunity and Curiosity left off by examining a key, unexplored dimension on Mars – depth. We will drill down to two metres below the surface of Mars for the first time, much further than Curiosity’s five centimetres. This is enough to take us far enough below the harsh surface environment of Mars – with cold temperatures, a thin carbon dioxide atmosphere and high levels of harmful radiation – to see if anything lives there.

We will decide where to drill using a number of instruments, including the PanCam instrument which I lead. Samples will be vaporised and put into a drawer for analysis by three instruments which will look for markers of life – such as complex carbonates.

One of the key aspects of Opportunity’s success was the teamwork between its science and engineering teams. This is definitely something that will be implemented on upcoming rovers. Many members of the Mars 2020 team, and some on the ExoMars team, have direct experience from Opportunity which will be invaluable as we learn how to operate our rovers on the planet.

Another interesting legacy of Opportunity is that we we don’t have to worry too much about Martian dust, except during exceptional global storms. Opportunity showed that that during the rest of the time, accumulating dust blows away naturally in the wind – helped by the movement of the rover over the ground causing vibration. It was a surprise that Opportunity lasted so long, and it certainly blazed a trail for us.

Rosalind Franklin has the best chance of any currently planned mission for detecting biomarkers and even perhaps evidence for past or present life on Mars. But we are building on the shoulders of giants, like the Opportunity Rover. #ThanksOppy indeed!

In this Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019, photo, Julien Esprit, left, competes with Jean Baptiste Marchetti-Waternaux during a national lightsaber tournament in Beaumont-sur-Oise, north of Paris. In France, it is easier than ever now to act out "Star Wars" fantasies. The fencing federation has officially recognized lightsaber dueling as a competitive sport. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122352361-1acd05421bae4dcdbd78e883363d1afd.jpgIn this Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019, photo, Julien Esprit, left, competes with Jean Baptiste Marchetti-Waternaux during a national lightsaber tournament in Beaumont-sur-Oise, north of Paris. In France, it is easier than ever now to act out "Star Wars" fantasies. The fencing federation has officially recognized lightsaber dueling as a competitive sport. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Sports, exploration

Staff & Wire Reports