Ohio won’t hit Sept. 8 deadline for medical marijuana


By JULIE CARR SMYTH - Associated Press - Tuesday, June 5



FILE - In this March 9, 2017, file photo, C-4 marijuana is weighed at the Greener Crossing Medical Marijuana Care Giver Center in Detroit. Ohio said Tuesday, June 5, 2018, that it will not have medical marijuana available by the September deadline, even as a key backer of recreational marijuana legalization said he's using a combination of strategies to continue expanding access to safe cannabis. (Todd McInturf/Detroit News via AP, File)

FILE - In this March 9, 2017, file photo, C-4 marijuana is weighed at the Greener Crossing Medical Marijuana Care Giver Center in Detroit. Ohio said Tuesday, June 5, 2018, that it will not have medical marijuana available by the September deadline, even as a key backer of recreational marijuana legalization said he's using a combination of strategies to continue expanding access to safe cannabis. (Todd McInturf/Detroit News via AP, File)


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio said Tuesday that it will not have medical marijuana available by the September deadline, even as a key backer of recreational marijuana legalization said he’s using a combination of strategies to continue expanding access to safe cannabis.

Several cultivators who were close to ramping up operations experienced inspection delays that now make it impossible to meet the date set by Ohio’s 2016 medical marijuana law, Department of Commerce policy adviser Mark Hamlin said.

“We know that the public expectation and patient expectation around Sept. 8 was significant, so that was really important to us to try to hit because we know that people have been counting on that date,” he said. “We don’t take lightly that the product is not going to be available on that date.”

Hamlin contended that the state is not technically out of compliance with the law, because it called for the program itself — not the marijuana — to be ready on the implementation date.

He couldn’t say exactly when sales will begin, other than as soon as possible. Ohio has licensed 25 large and small growers and on Monday awarded 56 dispensary licenses.

Ian James, who ran the unsuccessful ballot campaign to legalize both recreational and medical marijuana in 2015, likened a series of missteps with the program — including a convicted felon placed on an application screening committee, shared passwords and missed deadlines — to a classic satirical comedy.

“It’s kind of like ‘The Producers,’” he said. “You almost have to wonder if the state was taking its cue from Mel Brooks, purposely sabotaging (the program) from the outset, knowing that the Kasich administration doesn’t really want medical marijuana to work in Ohio. Because you can’t fumble this much and have it be like, we’re just that incompetent.”

Hamlin said that criticism is unfair.

James, founder and president of Green Light Acquisitions LLC, outlined a well-funded, multi-pronged approach for how his various business and political interests are pushing forward on $250 million of related projects.

“For us to think that by keeping it illegal we’re going to stop people is just simply fantasy,” James said, noting that polls show 14 percent of Ohioans use marijuana regularly and another 14 percent would if it were legalized. “You can’t smother a black market by just saying ‘Say No To Drugs.’”

James said his business has developed a line of therapeutic lotions, soaps and sprays using cannabidiol that he’s marketing to large national retailers, including Urban Outfitters and Sephora. The firm also is moving into insurance, pet products and beverages, he said.

James said his plans to pursue another constitutional amendment legalizing marijuana for personal use, which would likely appear on the 2020 ballot, haven’t been dampened by a competing proposal. He said that ballot issue has a “fatal flaw” that his lawyers believe would open the resulting marijuana market up to widespread abuse.

James also wants to see state lawmakers act. He said he’s again pushing a so-called “Fresh Start Act,” which calls for purging non-violent marijuana crimes that are now legal from offenders’ records. If lawmakers don’t act, he said his campaign organization would push it to the ballot as an initiated statute.

Another bill he’s advocating would open Ohio to hemp cultivation that’s now legal in many surrounding states, a proposal James said is backed by the American Farm Bureau.

Green Light attorney Ted Bibart said creating good cannabis policy is key to advocates’ ultimate goal.

“The goal is to continue to constantly educate,” he said, “but also to develop these industries in such a way that it will be mainstreamed, that they’re done safely, that they’re done appropriately, and that they’re done within the law so that they encourage regulatory frameworks that will be the undergirding of a fall of prohibition the same way we saw with alcohol — but far more responsibly done and with a focus on health and healing and wellness.”

Ohio Secretary of State’s Office to Honor CleanTurn Enterprises

COLUMBUS – CleanTurn Enterprises in Columbus has been selected by Secretary of State Jon Husted as one of June’s featured businesses for the Ohio Business Profile Program.

A representative from the Secretary of State’s office will visit CleanTurn Enterprises to present the company with a certificate highlighting this accomplishment. As part of the Ohio Business Profile program, Secretary Husted declared June as “Empowering Opportunities” Month to highlight businesses and organizations that help people overcome adversity and become part of the workforce.

CleanTurn Enterprises provides an array of supportive services focused on creating a platform for individuals to realize their potential. They are focused on creating a nurturing and loving community, along with a family culture that encourages and fosters a lifestyle characterized by resilience, integrity and healthy decisions.

Help needed in locating 17-year-old male who escaped from juvenile facility

June 6, 2018

CLEVELAND – The Ohio State Highway Patrol is asking the public to help locate a 17-year-old male who escaped from the Cuyahoga Hills Juvenile Correctional Facility in Highland Hills on May 22.

Nathaniel Lee Jacks was last seen in the early morning hours wearing dark blue khaki pants and a shirt/sweatshirt. He is 6 feet 1 inch tall and weighs 165 pounds. He has brown hair and eyes.

Jacks may be headed to Licking County.

If you see Jacks, or a person matching this description, he is dangerous and should not be approached. Contact 911 immediately.

New Superintendent Announced

OH Veterans Services

June 6, 2018

Retired U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman Dedicates New Role to Veterans

COLUMBUS – The Ohio Department of Veteran Services has named Terry Prince, a retired U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman, the new Superintendent of the Veterans Homes in Sandusky and Georgetown.

“We are excited to have Terry Prince part of our team,” says Director Chip Tansill. “Terry brings a senior level of healthcare experience to our homes after leading teams in the military regional healthcare systems, medical centers and hospitals.”

Prince began his military career in 1986, serving in the Dental Technician and Hospital Corpsman ratings. Over the years, Force Master Chief Prince was assigned to 14 different duty stations including service as the Command Master Chief of Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, and later, the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, MD. Additionally, he was the senior enlisted advisor to the Defense Health Agency and finally, the Director of the U.S. Navy Hospital Corps and Force Master Chief of Navy Medicine.

“I am honored to be selected as Superintendent and serve veterans, their families and our staff at the Ohio Veterans Homes with the full force and effort you would expect from a retired U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman.” says Prince. “There is no greater calling than to help others and my family and I are so excited to have this opportunity to do just that.”

The Ohio Veterans Home in Sandusky is a 427-bed nursing home facility. Two levels of care are offered: standard care for those veterans in need of any intermediate level of care, and special care for veterans with Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. The home opened in 1888 to care for veterans of the Civil War, and has been in continuous operation since. The Domiciliary offers 206-beds and necessary medical care to eligible veterans who need medical care but are capable of living independently.

The Ohio Veterans Home in Georgetown offers 168 beds for nursing home care. Two levels of care are offered: standard care for veterans in need of any intermediate level of care, and special care for veterans with Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. The home opened in 2003, and is located in the scenic countryside of Brown County.

Leland statement on House speaker vote

Speaker elected for first time in modern history without majority support

COLUMBUS— State Rep. David Leland (D-Columbus) issued the following statement in response to the House narrow, 11-round marathon vote to elect Rep. Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell) Speaker of the Ohio House. Chaos and dysfunction have plagued the legislature since the abrupt resignation of former speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville) in April, after he announced he was under FBI inquiry related to his official duties.

“After 11 rounds of voting Smith’s unremarkable ascendancy proves only one thing. The dark cloud of Republican scandal and FBI investigation still hangs heavy over the Ohio House.”

OHIO RESEARCH PROJECT WILL MONITOR TRAFFIC WITH DRONES

Drive Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio – (Jun 7, 2018) DriveOhio, the state’s new center for coordinating smart mobility initiatives, today announced plans to study the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), sometimes called drones, to monitor traffic and roadway conditions from the air along the 33 Smart Mobility Corridor. The three-year, $5.9 million study is a partnership between DriveOhio’s UAS Center and The Ohio State University College of Engineering.

“At DriveOhio, we are looking for innovative ways to integrate technology into our transportation systems. This project will help us explore the intersection between autonomous and connected vehicles on land and in the air. The goal is to understand how we can better manage traffic, roadway incidents, and roadway conditions using advanced technology and data analysis,” said Jim Barna, Executive Director of DriveOhio.

This research will include both air and ground vehicles and will complement ongoing work to test autonomous and connected vehicles along the 33 Smart Mobility Corridor, a 35-mile stretch of U.S. 33 between Dublin and East Liberty. Unmanned aircraft will monitor traffic and incident response along the corridor in conjunction with the state’s current fixed-location traffic camera system. The aircraft will interact with sensors and communication equipment along the corridor to feed data into the state’s Traffic Management Center.

The project will also use sensors and communication devices to ensure the unmanned aircraft will not collide with each other or with manned aircraft, such as small planes and helicopters, that also use the lower altitude airspace. It is estimated that as many as 5,000-manned aircraft are in the sky at any given time.

“One of the keys to better utilizing unmanned aircraft is to ensure they will not pose a threat to other aircraft traveling in the area. This research project will make the development of that safety system a priority so that other aircraft operations such as package delivery and air taxi services can be explored down the road,” said Fred Judson, Director of DriveOhio’s UAS Center.

The project team will be led by DriveOhio and The Ohio State University’s College of Engineering in conjunction with Cal Analytics, Gannett Fleming, AiRXOS (a GE venture), Gryphon Sensors, Transportation Research Center, Inc., Woolpert, The Ohio State University Airport, and Midwest Air Traffic Control. The 3-year research project is set to begin July 1, 2018.

“We’re excited to develop this system for Ohio, which will enable safe flight of unmanned aircraft and personal air vehicles beyond the line of sight of the operator,” said Professor James Gregory of The Ohio State University. “This system will pave the way towards integrating unmanned aircraft into the National Airspace System.”

DriveOhio was created by Governor Kasich on January 18, 2018, as a center within the Ohio Department of Transportation that brings together those who are responsible for building infrastructure in Ohio with those who are developing the advanced mobility technologies needed to allow the state’s transportation system to reach its full potential. DriveOhio’s UAS Center is the premier unmanned aircraft support agency for the State of Ohio. The mission of the center is to support flight operations for local, state, and federal government and agencies.

Ohio State MBA student named Tillman Scholar

Ohio State University

June 7, 2018

Matt Rosebaugh, a U.S. Army veteran, hopes to help others overcome obstacles

COLUMBUS, Ohio – An Ohio State University graduate student has been named a 2018 Tillman Scholar. Matt Rosebaugh is an MBA student in the Max M. Fisher College of Business, is one of just 60 scholars selected by the Pat Tillman Foundation for the prestigious award.

In recognition of their service, leadership and potential, the newly selected class will receive more than $1.3 million in scholarship funding to pursue higher education and continue their service in the fields of medicine, law, business, policy, technology, education and the arts.

Rosebaugh enlisted in the Army in 2002, wanting to make an impact after watching the events of September 11, 2001. He served 15 years of active duty and reserve time, including one long-term deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and several short-duration special operations contingency missions. During his service, he earned many military honors, including the Bronze Star and Meritorious Service Medals.

In selecting Rosebaugh, the foundation observed, “Matt continually gives hope and motivation to others to step into the arena, overcome their circumstances and follow their dreams.”

Rosebaugh earned a BS in military history from the U.S. Military Academy in 2009. After graduating, he was a special operations helicopter pilot, operations manager and unit leader, deploying with teams of up to 80 personnel to execute rapid logistical movements and operations around the globe.

Before coming to Ohio State, he was a helicopter flight instructor at Fort Rucker, Alabama, leading an organization that trained graduate-level skills to advanced Army and Foreign National helicopter pilots.

After completing his MBA in spring 2019, Rosebaugh hopes to be a social enterprise entrepreneur, providing opportunity for underprivileged and underserved populations in the Columbus community through several social enterprise ventures.

Morley O. Stone selected to lead Ohio State’s Office of Research

Ohio State University

June 7, 2018

Stone joins Ohio State from Air Force Research Laboratory

The Ohio State University has named Morley O. Stone as the new senior vice president for research.

Stone joins Ohio State after serving as the chief technology officer at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton. The university Board of Trustees will consider approval of his appointment this week.

In his new role, Stone will oversee strategic planning and infrastructure support for the university’s $864 million annual basic and applied research program.

“Throughout his career, Dr. Stone has built strong, strategic collaborations with academia, industry and government organizations, including Ohio State,” said President Michael V. Drake. “We look forward to our continued work together to uplift lives in our communities through outstanding research.”

Stone is recognized as an international leader in human performance and biomimetics with more than 25 years of experience in research and development. As the chief technology officer at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Stone oversaw more than $2.3 billion in science and technology programs and $2.5 billion in externally funded projects in areas ranging from materials science to space-based technologies.

He previously served as chief scientist for AFRL’s Human Performance Wing, and as a manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, created programs in bio-inspired sensors, robotics and more. Stone’s experience includes leading partnerships with the National Science Foundation, NASA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Defense Health Agency.

“Further advancing our research enterprise is a key element of Ohio State’s Time and Change strategic plan — and vital to our DNA as a land-grant university dedicated to uplifting lives in our communities and around the world,” said Executive Vice President and Provost Bruce A. McPheron. “Dr. Stone will help enhance our position among the top national and international public research universities.”

“I am excited to help implement the strategic vision for the Office of Research at The Ohio State University that will build upon the office’s current success while significantly expanding the university’s research footprint into new spaces,” Stone said.

Stone has published more than 90 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters and holds more than a dozen patents and invention disclosures. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In addition, he serves as a fellow for both the AFRL and SPIE, the international society for optical engineering.

He holds a BS in biological sciences from Wright State University and a PhD in biochemistry from Carnegie Mellon University.

FILE – In this March 9, 2017, file photo, C-4 marijuana is weighed at the Greener Crossing Medical Marijuana Care Giver Center in Detroit. Ohio said Tuesday, June 5, 2018, that it will not have medical marijuana available by the September deadline, even as a key backer of recreational marijuana legalization said he’s using a combination of strategies to continue expanding access to safe cannabis. (Todd McInturf/Detroit News via AP, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/06/web1_120693839-b5e02ffcf1e14b2397bfe27ba0f72ba0.jpgFILE – In this March 9, 2017, file photo, C-4 marijuana is weighed at the Greener Crossing Medical Marijuana Care Giver Center in Detroit. Ohio said Tuesday, June 5, 2018, that it will not have medical marijuana available by the September deadline, even as a key backer of recreational marijuana legalization said he’s using a combination of strategies to continue expanding access to safe cannabis. (Todd McInturf/Detroit News via AP, File)

By JULIE CARR SMYTH

Associated Press

Tuesday, June 5

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