STATE HEADLINES


STAFF & WIRE REPORTS



FILE – In this Feb. 3, 2018, file photo, Ross Geiger poses for a photo at his home in the Cincinnati suburb of Loveland, Ohio. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from Geiger, a juror who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren't given enough information about the convicted killer's tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

FILE – In this Feb. 3, 2018, file photo, Ross Geiger poses for a photo at his home in the Cincinnati suburb of Loveland, Ohio. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from Geiger, a juror who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren't given enough information about the convicted killer's tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)


FILE – This undated file photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, convicted of fatally stabbing Fred Hicks in 1997 in Cincinnati. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from juror Ross Geiger, who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren't given enough information about the convicted killer's tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP, File)


FILE – In this Feb. 3, 2018, file photo, Ross Geiger speaks as he poses for a photograph at his home in the Cincinnati suburb of Loveland, Ohio. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from Geiger, a juror who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren't given enough information about the convicted killer's tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)


Parole board hears former juror’s death sentence regrets

By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS

Associated Press

Thursday, June 14

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A former juror on a death penalty trial said Thursday that he was “frankly upset” to read information last year about the terrible childhood of the man he and 11 other jurors recommended be executed two decades ago.

The upbringing of killer Raymond Tibbetts was presented as a debate between his attorneys, who said his background was terrible, and prosecutors, who said it wasn’t that bad, ex-juror Ross Geiger told the Ohio Parole Board.

Thus, Geiger said he was surprised when he came across information presented to the board last year that documented horrific facts about Tibbetts’ early years, but which jurors never heard.

“It was like just a different story,” Geiger said at the beginning of an 86-minute appearance before the board in a rare follow-up clemency hearing.

When Tibbetts was a boy, he and his brothers were tied to a single bed at night, were not fed properly, were thrown down stairs, had their fingers beaten with spatulas and were burned on heating registers, according to Tibbetts’ application for mercy last year.

The only hints of Tibbetts’ childhood at trial came from the lone witness who was called to talk about factors that might go against a death sentence, Geiger said. The witness was a psychiatrist who spoke briefly to members of Tibbetts’ family.

“I was just struck and frankly upset that information that was available was not even addressed, other than in very summary fashion,” Geiger said.

Tibbetts, 61, is set to die in October for killing Fred Hicks at Hicks’ Cincinnati home in 1997.

In addition to the death sentence for killing Hicks, Tibbetts also received life imprisonment for fatally beating and stabbing his wife, 42-year-old Judith Crawford, during an argument that same day over Tibbetts’ crack cocaine habit.

The 67-year-old Hicks had hired Crawford as a caretaker and allowed the couple to stay with him.

The parole board voted 11-1 last year against mercy for Tibbetts. Republican Gov. John Kasich then delayed Tibbetts’ execution after receiving a letter from Geiger saying he believed he and other jurors were misled about the “truly terrible conditions” of Tibbetts’ upbringing.

Geiger acknowledged that during deliberations, jurors had access to a full report from the county human services department containing some of the worst details about Tibbetts’ childhood.

Several board members asked Geiger why jurors didn’t rely on that more.

Geiger acknowledged they could have, but also said they were inundated with material. He also likened the situation to students receiving a textbook from a teacher who didn’t bother to explain what was in it.

“Is it too much to ask for a juror to rely on attorneys to provide the information that was available?” he said, referring to what he thought he should have heard during trial testimony.

Geiger said he isn’t anti-death penalty now, but takes a more nuanced view of the issue. He said there was never any question about Tibbetts’ guilt.

Hamilton County prosecutors have previously argued that Tibbetts’ background does not outweigh his crimes. That includes stabbing Crawford after he had already beaten her to death, and then repeatedly stabbing Hicks, a “sick, defenseless, hearing-impaired man in whose home Tibbetts lived,” they told the parole board.

The board planned to issue its ruling June 22.

Andrew Welsh-Huggins can be reached on Twitter at https://twitter.com/awhcolumbus.

The Ohio State Bar Foundation (OSBF) Inducts New Members Into Fellows Program

OSBF Welcomes 32 Attorneys to Its Efforts To Advance the Law and Build a Better Justice System

COLUMBUS, Ohio, June 14, 2018 – The Ohio State Bar Foundation (“OSBF”) announced today that 32 attorneys have been inducted into the Foundation. The ceremony took place on June 12 at the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center. Supreme Court of Ohio Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor and OSBF President Carol Marx presided over the ceremony and reception honoring the inductees.

The OSBF is the philanthropic arm of the Ohio State Bar Association (OSBA) and promotes the pursuit of justice and the public understanding of the rule of law. By extending membership to lawyers and judges who are committed to these ideals, OSBF enlists their talents to further its mission. A new class of civic-minded lawyers is inducted annually. Fellows volunteer their time to organizations across the state that impact their communities.

Lawyers may be nominated by a peer or may self-nominate for the program. A committee reviews each candidate before he or she is asked to commit his or her time to outreach programs and to pledge financial support to fuel the OSBF’s statewide grantmaking program.

Here in alphabetical order are this year’s inductees:

Lauren E. Bartlett, of Ada, is the director of legal clinics and an assistant professor of law at the Ohio Northern University Claude W. Pettit College of Law. She is an alumnus of American University Washington College of Law. Bartlett was named an OSBF Community Service Award winner for Attorneys 40 & Under in 2017. She handles pro bono cases for survivors of domestic violence, volunteers with Habitat for Humanity and co-founded the Louisiana Justice Institute while in law school.

Hannah L. Botkin-Doty, of Columbus, is a founding partner of Doty and Obenour. She serves on the Board of the Women Lawyers of Franklin County and is the current Chair of the Diversity Committee. She practices LGBT law and recently became an adjunct professor at Capital University. She’s an alumnus of Capital University Law School and recently was awarded its G.O.L.D. award (Graduate of the Last Decade).

Judge W. David Branstool, of Newark, was elected to the Licking County Court of Common Pleas in 2010 after serving as a Judge in Licking County’s Municipal Court from 2003 to 2010. During his tenure at the Municipal Court, Judge Branstool started Licking County’s first specialized court docket known as the LIFT Program (“Licking County Intervention for Treatment”) to better supervise offenders dealing with mental health issues. Branstool received the Special Community Contribution Award from the Community Mental Health and Recovery Board of Licking and Knox Counties for his contribution to the LIFT Program. He’s also received the Licking County Wellness and Recovery Champion Award.

Judge Kimberly J. Brown, of Columbus, was elected to the Franklin County Common Pleas court in 2012. An alumnus of Capital University Law School, she served eight years in the U.S. Naval Reserve and received a Navy commendation for her service. She was named an Ohio Rising Star in 2005, 2006 and 2007 by the Ohio Super Lawyers Rising Stars and voted one of Columbus’s Top Lawyers in Columbus Business First’s 2005 Verdict. She’s also a Fellow of the Litigation Counsel of America and a board member of LifeCare Alliance.

John M. Buchenic, of Hubbard, is an alumnus of the Ohio Northern University College of Law and founded his own practice. He’s the founder of Global Development Solutions, through which he created a program using solar ovens to promote cross-cultural educational relationships centered around STEM learning. The organization operates three international grant programs with grantees in Kenya, Haiti and Pakistan.

John E. Codrea, of Peninsula, practices as an attorney at Manley Deas Kochalski in Cleveland. He’s a retired colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve and a former member and president of the board of trustees for Western Reserve Legal Services. Codrea is a member of the Akron Bar and a member of the Ohio State Bar Association.

Michael L. Corey, of Columbus, is the Executive Director of the Human Service Chamber of Franklin County. He graduated from Ohio State’s Moritz College of Law in 2012 as Executive Editor of the Ohio State Law Journal. He serves as a board member with the Columbus Chapter of the American Constitution Society. Corey is also a board member of the Franklin County Young Democrats. He is a member of the Ohio State Bar Association where he serves on the Advisory Council on Diversity Initiatives, and is a member of the Columbus Bar Association, where he serves as Chair of the Publications and Editorial Committee.

Brandon D. Cox, of Cleveland, is a graduate of Georgetown University and Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Cox is counsel at Tucker Ellis. Recognized on the list of 40 Under 40 – Nation’s Best Advocates by the National Bar Association in 2017, Cox also received the Outstanding Alumni Spotlight Award by the Black Law Students Association (BLSA) last year. He serves as First Vice President with the Norman Minor Bar Association. Cox actively supports minority law students at his alma mater as the coach of the Cleveland-Marshall Moot Court Team, winner of the 2017 Fredrick Douglas Moot Court Competition. Cox was also awarded the OSBF’s District 12 Community Service Award for Attorneys 40 & Under this Spring.

Lisa Carey Dean, of Akron, is a partner at Roderick Linton Belfance. Dean served as a hands-on volunteer for the Street Law Program of the Akron Bar Association. She has been a member of various committees for the Summit County Domestic Relations Court and has been a court-selected presenter to Leadership Akron, Justice Day Mock Trial, a presenter to the Volunteer Legal Services Program, and served on the Board of Directors of the Victim’s Assistance Program of Akron.

Katherine (Kate) S. Decker, of Toledo, is an associate at Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick. Decker is Co-Chair of Leadership Shumaker Toledo, the firm’s philanthropic group. She also leads the Toledo arm of its Women’s Leadership Initiative (“WLI”) affinity group. Decker has served as a mentor through the Ohio Women’s Bar Association Mentoring Circles program since 2014. She is a member of the Ohio State, Ohio Women’s, and Toledo Bar Associations. She was selected for membership in The National Trial Lawyers 40 Under 40 and received the Ohio Association for Justice “Distinguished Service Award” in 2012.

Judge Glenn H.H Derryberry, of Lima, has served as Judge of the Allen County Probate and Juvenile Court in Lima, Ohio since 2007. Prior to that, he was chief magistrate at the Allen County Juvenile Court. He’s a member of the Allen County Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He’s a member of the Ohio Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Children, Families and the Court.

Hamilton (Hal) DeSaussure, Jr., of Hudson, is an attorney at Day Ketterer. An alumnus of Wake Forest University Law School, he’s a member of the Ohio State Bar Association, the Akron Bar Foundation Board of Governors, and an Akron Bar Foundation Fellow. DeSaussure served on the board of directors for the Akron Law Library Association – Board of Directors. He was named an Ohio Super Lawyer for Business Litigation in 2017 and 2018.

Jeffrey L. Evans, of Richwood, is a founding partner of Evans, Evans & Hoffman. He graduated from Ohio Northern University. He is an Acting Judge with the Marysville Municipal Court in Union County. Evans is a member of the American and Ohio Bar Associations.

Tani L. Eyer, of Bucyrus, is an attorney with Sears, Pry, Griebling & McBride. Eyer graduated from the Claude Pettit College of Law at Ohio Northern University. She’s a member of the Crawford County Bar Association, serving as vice president. She also serves on the board of Together We Hurt/Together We Heal and Crawford Works. She previously served as a mentor for the Crawford County Municipal Court’s Diversion/Redemption Program.

Kenneth (Ken) R. Goldberg, of Dublin, is a partner with Strip Hoppers Leithart. He earned his law degree from Capital University Law School. A member of the Columbus and Ohio State Bar Associations, Goldberg is active in the Columbus Bar Association’s Family Relations Law, Business Tax and Common Pleas Committees. Since 2005, Goldberg has been an Ohio State Bar Association Certified Family Relations Law Specialist.

Larry S. Hayman, of Columbus, is a Pre-Law Advisor and Specialist at Ohio University’s Center for Law, Justice & Culture. He’s a member of the American Bar Association and the Athens County Bar Association. He’s co-chair of the LGBT committee for the Columbus Bar Association. Hayman was awarded the Community Service Award for Attorneys 40 and Under, District 17 in 2016-2017.

Corinne Hoover Six, of Akron, is the lead attorney of Hoover Kacyon, LLC’s Family Law Practice Group and is a Certified Specialist in Family Law. She’s been recognized as a National Trial Lawyers Top 100 and Top 40 under 40 and from the American Institute of Family Law Attorneys 10 Best, and from the National Academy of Family Law Attorneys Top 10. She’s an active member of the Akron Bar Association and as a member of the Family Law Section, a Foundation Fellow and on the Board of Directors of the Akron Bar Foundation, the charitable wing of the Akron Bar Association.

W. Andrew Joseph, of Zanesville, is a partner with Gottlieb, Johnston, Beam & Dal Ponte. He was named to The National Trial Lawyers: Top 40 Under 40 for 2017. He currently serves as president of the board of directors for Big Brothers Big Sisters Serving Muskingum, Guernsey, and Morgan Counties and is president of the Muskingum Valley Park District Board of Commissioners. He’s also served as an advisor for the Mock Trial Team at Bishop Rosecrans High School, his alma mater, since 2013.

Brian J. Laliberte, of Columbus, is counsel with Tucker Ellis. He was named to Ohio Super Lawyers in 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. Laliberte was named an Ohio Top 40 Under 40 by The National Trial Lawyers in 2012 and 2013, and Ohio Super Lawyers Rising Star in 2006, 2007, 2011, 2012 and 2013. He was also selected by Columbus Business First as a 40 Under 40 recipient.

Luther L. Liggett, Jr., of Columbus, is an attorney with Graff & McGovern. He’s an alumnus of The George Washington University. Liggett was named a Super Lawyer by Ohio Super Lawyers in 2004-2007.

Marley C. Nelson, of Powell, is an assistant public defender in Franklin County with the Appeals and Post-Convictions Division. She’s a participant in the Supreme Court of Ohio Lawyer to Lawyer Mentoring Program. She practiced law in Illinois and Texas before moving to Ohio. She’s the assistant coach of the Ohio State University Undergraduate Mock Trial Team. Nelson is a member of the Ohio State Bar Association’s Leadership Academy. She is a member of the Columbus Bar Association, and was nominated as Young Laywer of the Year by the Illinois State Bar Association.

Judge Michael J. Newman, of Dayton, is a U.S. Magistrate Judge for the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of Ohio. He recently finished a year as president of the Federal Bar Association. He has served as statewide chair of the Ohio State Bar Association’s Federal Courts & Practice Committee, on the Cincinnati Bar Association’s Board of Trustees, and chaired the Dayton Bar Association’s Federal Practice Committee. In 2010, he was honored to receive the Boots Fisher Public Service Award, given annually to one lawyer in the United States for “exemplary community, public and charitable service.” He has been recognized by the Black Lawyers Association of Cincinnati (BLAC) and sits on the statewide board of directors for the Law & Leadership Institute (LLI).

Judge Colleen M. O’Toole, of Warren, is a judge for 11th District Court of appeals. She’s a member of the National Association of Judicial Interpreters and Translators, the Ohio Judicial Conference, the Cleveland Bar Association, as well as the Lake, Geauga, Portage, Ashtabula and Trumbull County Bar Associations. O’Toole is also a board member for the NAACP executive committee in Lake County.

Ashley L. Oliker, of New Albany, is a business litigation member of Frost Todd Brown. Oliker was included in Ohio Super Lawyers Rising Stars 2018 and was recognized in the 2017 edition of “People to Know in Law” by Columbus Business First. She has served on the Board of the Women Lawyers of Franklin County and was its President in 2016. She is a member of the Ohio Women’s Bar Association and is a member of the Ohio State Bar Association’s Litigation Section. She has served on the Columbus Bar Association’s Board of Governors. Oliker received the Ohio State Bar Foundation’s 40 and Under Service Award in 2015.

Beryl Brown Piccolantonio, of Gahanna, is chief ombudsman for the Ohio Workers Compensation Ombudsperson System. She was elected to the Gahanna Jefferson Board of Education in 2015 and serves as president. She regularly volunteers with the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education and serves as a poll worker and precinct election official on Election Day. She has also served with Eastland Fairfield Board of Education, the Gahanna Civil Service Commission, Kids Voting of Central Ohio advisory board, and the New Leaders Council advisory board.

Allison Taller Reich, of Cleveland, is an associate at Frantz Ward. She’s a recipient of the Ohio State Bar Foundation Community Service Award for Attorneys 40 and Under for District 12 and has been recognized as “One to Watch” by Cleveland Magazine’s Community Leader. Reich is a member of the Ohio State Bar Association, the American Bar Association, the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association and volunteers with the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland.

Merry (Meg) M. Saunders, of Athens, is the First Assistant Prosecutor with the Athens County Prosecutor’s Office. A graduate of the University of Miami & Western Michigan University Thomas M. Cooley School of Law, Saunders devotes time to assisting individuals formerly addicted to drugs. She participates in opiate task force meetings to help combat the drug epidemic in Athens County.

Sheena A. Sjostrand-Post, of Newark, is a partner at Hayes Law Offices and an Adjunct Professor for Jetter School of Business at Mount Vernon Nazarene University. She’s an alumnus of Capital University Law School. She is secretary of the Licking County Bar Association and is a Licking County Mock Trial Judge. She’s a member of the Ohio State Bar Association and the American Bar Association.

Judge David N. Stansbury, of Newark, has served on the Licking County Municipal Court since 2010. He is the immediate past President and Administrative Judge of the court. Stansbury is a member of the Ohio State Bar Association and Licking County Bar Association. He currently serves on the LCBA Municipal Court Criminal Law Committee and as the Chair of the Municipal Court Civil Law Committee. Stansbury belongs to the Ohio Judicial Conference. He also belongs to the Association of Municipal and County Court Judges of Ohio. Stansbury has presided over the court’s drug court program, called LIFT court, since taking the bench. He is a member of the National Association of Drug Court Professionals.

Elizabeth (Beth) E.W. Weinewuth, of Cincinnati, is a partner with Vorys Legal Counsel. She is a member of the American Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Association and the Cincinnati Bar Association. Weinewuth is also an appointed member of the Ohio State Bar Association’s Estate Planning, Trust & Probate Section Council. She has been named an Ohio Super Lawyers Rising Star in Estate and Trust Litigation, the only Ohio attorney in this class, each year since 2014.

Joseph E. Wenger, of Columbus, is a staff attorney for Judge Julia L. Dorrian in the Tenth District Court of Appeals. He graduated from the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. He currently chairs the board of Equality Ohio and is a board member of the Equality Ohio Education Fund. He’s a member of the American Constitution Society.

Erica H. Young, of Columbus, is an Assistant Public Defender for the Office of the Ohio Public Defender’s office. She is an alumnus of Capital University Law School. Her memberships past and present include Women Lawyers of Franklin County, American Bar Association, Ohio State Bar Association, Columbus Bar Association, Legal Aid Society of Columbus and the Ohio Association for Justice.

About the Ohio State Bar Foundation

The Ohio State Bar Foundation is a 501(c)(3) grant-making organization that works to advance the law and build a better justice system. We believe our democracy works better when people understand the law and have fair and equal access to justice. For more information about the Ohio State Bar Foundation, please visit https://osbf.org.

Shoe Drive for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood Anniversary

WOSU Public Media

COLUMBUS, OHIO, June 15, 2018 – To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, WOSU Public Media is partnering with independent theater Gateway Film Center for a one-night shoe drive. The drive coincides with the premiere screening of Won’t You Be My Neighbor, a new documentary that takes an intimate look at America’s favorite neighbor, Fred Rogers. As fans of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood will recall, Fred Rogers opened every episode by changing out of his loafers into a pair of sneakers.

Gently used and new shoes can be dropped off at Gateway Film Center (1550 North High Street, Columbus, Ohio 43201) on Friday, June 29 beginning at 6:00 p.m. and the special screening of the documentary will be at 7:00 p.m. Tickets may be purchased here http://gatewayfilmcenter.org/wont-you-be-my-neighbor/ and patrons who make a shoe donation will receive a voucher for free popcorn and soda.

The shoes that WOSU Public Media collects will be delivered to Soles4Souls, a non-profit social enterprise that creates sustainable jobs and provides relief through the distribution of shoes and clothing around the world.

“To have the opportunity to extend the legacy of Fred Rogers in a small but significant way, and share his story through this screening with our community partner, Gateway Film Center, is meaningful to WOSU and the PBS audiences we impact every day,” said Tom Rieland, General Manager of WOSU Public Media.

“I believe movies, and specifically documentaries, play a new and vital role in educating our community,” shared Gateway Film Center President Chris Hamel. “We’re proud to partner with WOSU — an organization dedicated to lifelong learning — to offer this intimate portrait of a man who taught us all a thing or two about being a better person.”

About WOSU Public Media

WOSU Public Media is a community-supported, noncommercial network of public radio and television stations, and digital services. For more information, please visit wosu.org

About Gateway Film Center

Gateway Film Center is Central Ohio’s world-class nonprofit, independent theater, playing a maverick mix of documentaries, indies, world cinema, studio and Ohio grown films. It has been named the city’s best theater by every major publication, and was identified as a top-20 art house in North America by Sundance. Visit www.gatewayfilmcenter.org.

About Soles4Souls

Soles4Souls disrupts the cycle of poverty by creating sustainable jobs and providing relief through the distribution of shoes and clothing around the world. Headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee, the organization repurposes product to supply its micro-enterprise, disaster relief and direct assistance programs. Since 2006, it has distributed more than 30 million pairs of shoes in 127 countries. A nonprofit social enterprise, Soles4Souls earns more than half of its income and commits 100% of donations to programs. Visit soles4souls.org for more information.

About Fred Rogers Productions

Fred Rogers Productions was founded by Fred Rogers in 1971 as the non-profit producer of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood for PBS. In the years that followed, it not only created hundreds of episodes of this much-loved program, but also extended Fred’s values and approach to other efforts in promoting children’s social, emotional and behavioral health and supporting parents, caregivers, teachers and other professionals in their work with children. Today, Fred Rogers Productions continues to build on Fred’s legacy in innovative ways through a wide variety of media, and engaging new generations of children and families with his timeless wisdom. The company’s highly rated, award-winning children’s series include Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, Peg + Cat and Odd Squad. For more information, visit www.fredrogers.org.

ACT Ohio Endorses DeWine for Governor

Friday, June 15, 2018

COLUMBUS– The Affiliated Construction Trades (ACT OHIO) today announced their endorsement of Mike DeWine and Jon Husted for Governor and Lt. Governor of Ohio.

“Mike DeWine and Jon Husted have an unparalleled commitment to strengthening and growing Ohio’s economy by investing in our infrastructure, and more importantly, our workforce and Ohio’s families,” said Matthew Szollosi, Executive Director of ACT Ohio. “I have no doubt that Mike DeWine and Jon Husted are ‘all in’ when it comes to job creation. They are the leaders our state needs to improve life for Ohioans, attract and retain quality job opportunities and take Ohio’s economy to the next level.”

In announcing their endorsement, ACT Ohio set forth that the organization endorses candidates, regardless of their political party, who demonstrate “a genuine commitment to the success of the construction industry.”

ACT was established by the Ohio State Building and Construction Trades Council to facilitate industrial and economic development and promote industry best practices for Ohio’s public and private construction. It serves over 92,000 members in Ohio and its affiliates work with over 14,000 contractors doing business in the Buckeye State.

ACT Ohio is the sixth labor organization to endorse Mike DeWine for Governor of Ohio.

Mike DeWine and Jon Husted have also been endorsed by the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 18, the Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters, the Ohio Sheet Metal Workers from Local 24 and Local 33, the Ohio State Conference of Plasterers & Cement Masons, and the Northwest Ohio Building and Construction Trades.

Tri-State Building Trades Endorse DeWine-Husted

Friday, June 15, 2018

COLUMBUS– The Tri-State Building Trades today announced their endorsement of Mike DeWine and Jon Husted for Governor and Lt. Governor of Ohio in the 2018 General Election.

“The future of our state’s economy, jobs and infrastructure is of the greatest importance to our members and their families, and Mike DeWine is the right candidate to fight for them,” said Mark Johnson, representing the Tri-State Building Trades.

The Tri-State Building & Construction Trades Council is a large three-state regional council representing over 20,000 active and retired construction workers from 55 affiliated construction craft local unions.

Mike DeWine and Jon Husted have also been endorsed by the International Union of Operating Engineers, the Ohio Conference of Plasterers & Cement Masons, the Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters, the Sheet Metal Workers from Locals 24 & 33, the Northwest Ohio Building Trades, and ACT Ohio.

Attorney General DeWine Observes Elder Abuse Awareness Day

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine

June 15, 2018

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine today joined organizations around the world in commemorating Elder Abuse Awareness Day (June 15), which calls attention to the problem of abuse and neglect of older adults.

“Elder abuse is too often overlooked or under-reported,” Attorney General DeWine said. “Victims may fear retaliation, or they may not be able to protect themselves. At the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, we’re committed to bringing attention to this serious problem and working hard to stop it.”

Elder abuse may include physical abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse, financial exploitation, or neglect. For every case reported to authorities, several more are believed to be unreported. Perpetrators may include family members (such as adult children or spouses), caregivers, or others. Risk factors include social isolation, bereavement, cognitive decline, dependence on another for care, and depression.

Warning signs of elder abuse may include:

  • Changes in an older adult’s physical appearance, such as weight loss or unexplained bruising or bleeding
  • Changes in an older adult’s personality or mood
  • Changes in an older adult’s finances or money management
  • A dominating, threatening caregiver or new “best friend”
  • Exclusion from other family members or friends
  • Changes in an older adult’s home environment

To protect Ohio’s older adults, the Ohio Attorney General’s Office works with local authorities in the investigation and prosecution of elder abuse cases and investigates patient abuse and neglect in long-term care settings. Through the Ohio Attorney General’s Elder Justice Initiative, which Attorney General DeWine launched in 2014, the office also provides support, education, and outreach services to combat elder financial exploitation and abuse.

The Ohio Attorney General’s Elder Abuse Commission, which includes members representing dozens of agencies and associations, also provides a forum for improving elder justice throughout the state.

A recent survey conducted by the commission identified prevention as a top priority area for research on elder abuse. The survey, which received responses from about 450 people across the state, asked respondents how they would allocate resources among several research questions. The top question was “What programs and policies can best prevent elder abuse before it happens?” followed by “What programs and policies can best serve victims after elder abuse has begun?” The survey results were consistent among respondents from urban and rural regions and among different types of professionals, such as advocates and researchers.

On June 25, the Ohio Attorney General’s Elder Abuse Commission and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services will hold a free event to raise awareness about elder abuse and to bring together advocates and professionals from across the state. The event will examine risk factors, the impact of diminished capacity, and other issues. Details and registration information can be found on the Ohio Attorney General’s website.

To help prevent fraud, which is estimated to cost older Americans billions of dollars, the Ohio Attorney General’s Office also will present several “senior scams” workshops at locations across the state.

To request assistance, training, or more information about elder justice issues, contact the Ohio Attorney General’s Office at 800-282-0515 or visit www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov.

Attorney General DeWine Announces $100 Million Multistate Settlement with Citibank over Libor Manipulation

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine

June 15, 2018

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, along with 41 other attorneys general, today announced a $100 million settlement with Citibank for fraudulent conduct involving the London interbank offered rate, or Libor, a key interest rate with widespread impact on global markets.

Most of the settlement funds — about $95 million — will be used to reimburse government and not-for-profit organizations that were affected by the conduct and had Libor-linked swaps and other financial contracts with Citibank.

Several Ohio entities, such as pension funds, hospital systems, and universities, are expected to qualify. Organizations will be notified and will have the opportunity to opt in if they are eligible to receive funds from the settlement.

The settlement stems from a multistate investigation into alleged Libor manipulation, such as inaccurate Libor submissions, by Citibank and other banks. The attorneys general alleged that government entities and not-for-profit organizations were harmed when they entered into swaps and other financial contracts with Citibank and other banks without knowing of the manipulation.

Citibank, which has cooperated with the investigation, is the third of several dollar-Libor-setting panel banks under investigation by the state attorneys general to resolve the claims against it. Similar settlements were reached previously with Deutsche Bank and Barclays.

Participating in the Citibank settlement are the attorneys general of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

DeWine-Husted Raises Over $3 Million in Post-Primary Report

Friday, June 15, 2018

COLUMBUS– The DeWine-Husted for Ohio campaign today filed its post-primary campaign finance report with over $3 million raised. The campaign has more than $7.2 million in its campaign account.

“Mike DeWine and Jon Husted cannot be outdone on the campaign trail, their grassroots energy is unmatched, and today’s report, like each of the reports before it, shows they are the candidates to beat,” said Dave Luketic, DeWine-Husted Campaign Manager.

Of the $3 million reported today, the first $1 million was raised in just 72 hours after Mike DeWine was declared the winner of the Republican Gubernatorial Primary Election on May 8, 2018.

For comparison, Kasich-Taylor for Ohio reported raising $1,278,563.30 and had $5,700,857.18 on-hand for the Post-Primary Report in 2010.

DEWINE-HUSTED POST-PRIMARY FILING QUICK FACTS:

$3,070,336.48 raised from April 19, 2018 to June 8, 2018.

$7,204,071.36 cash-on-hand as of June 8, 2018

$319,401.61 in-kind contributions.

2,031 individual contributors.

Contributors came from 85 of 88 Ohio Counties.

FILE – In this Feb. 3, 2018, file photo, Ross Geiger poses for a photo at his home in the Cincinnati suburb of Loveland, Ohio. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from Geiger, a juror who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren’t given enough information about the convicted killer’s tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/06/web1_120760589-f4fc039a4b234fa5af885b7231dc1dcb-1.jpgFILE – In this Feb. 3, 2018, file photo, Ross Geiger poses for a photo at his home in the Cincinnati suburb of Loveland, Ohio. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from Geiger, a juror who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren’t given enough information about the convicted killer’s tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

FILE – This undated file photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, convicted of fatally stabbing Fred Hicks in 1997 in Cincinnati. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from juror Ross Geiger, who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren’t given enough information about the convicted killer’s tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/06/web1_120760589-1f46651f640d4a7798a923217773da77-1.jpgFILE – This undated file photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, convicted of fatally stabbing Fred Hicks in 1997 in Cincinnati. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from juror Ross Geiger, who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren’t given enough information about the convicted killer’s tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP, File)

FILE – In this Feb. 3, 2018, file photo, Ross Geiger speaks as he poses for a photograph at his home in the Cincinnati suburb of Loveland, Ohio. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from Geiger, a juror who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren’t given enough information about the convicted killer’s tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/06/web1_120760589-e454e006d2a941eeb5f949f04b2a5c65-1.jpgFILE – In this Feb. 3, 2018, file photo, Ross Geiger speaks as he poses for a photograph at his home in the Cincinnati suburb of Loveland, Ohio. Ohio Parole Board members, who voted 11-1 in 2017 against sparing death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts, scheduled a rare second clemency hearing Thursday, June 14, 2018, to hear directly from Geiger, a juror who recommended Tibbetts be sentenced to death but now says jurors weren’t given enough information about the convicted killer’s tough childhood. Tibbetts is currently set to be executed by lethal injection on Oct. 17, 2018, after Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich granted Tibbetts a temporary reprieve on Feb. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

STAFF & WIRE REPORTS