Lunar Module replica stolen


Staff & Wire Reports



FILE - In this July 24, 1969, file photo, the Apollo 11 command module lands in the Pacific Ocean and the crew waits to be picked up by U.S. Navy personnel after an eight day mission to the moon. A solid-gold replica of the Apollo 11 lunar module stolen in July 2017 from an Ohio museum honoring the late astronaut Neil Armstrong has yet to be recovered, a year later. (AP Photo/File)

FILE - In this July 24, 1969, file photo, the Apollo 11 command module lands in the Pacific Ocean and the crew waits to be picked up by U.S. Navy personnel after an eight day mission to the moon. A solid-gold replica of the Apollo 11 lunar module stolen in July 2017 from an Ohio museum honoring the late astronaut Neil Armstrong has yet to be recovered, a year later. (AP Photo/File)


Gold lunar module replica stolen from museum still missing

By MARK GILLISPIE

Associated Press

Thursday, August 2

CLEVELAND (AP) — It’s been just over a year since a thief broke into the Armstrong Air and Space Museum in Ohio and stole an 18-karat gold replica of the Apollo 11 lunar module and other artifacts that have yet to be recovered or suspects arrested.

The replicas created by Cartier were given to Neil Armstrong, the first person to step onto the lunar surface, and to fellow astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins in Paris following their historic 1969 moon voyage. The theft from the Armstrong museum in Wapakoneta prompted fears that it would be melted down for its gold value, which remains around $40,000.

The 5-inch-tall (12.7-centimeter) replica given to Aldrin sold at auction last November for nearly $150,000.

Wapakoneta Police Chief Calvin Schneider, a native son of Armstrong’s birthplace in western Ohio, called the theft was a “body blow.” He said an FBI analysis of evidence gathered after the theft last July could prove helpful in tracking suspects.

“Once we get something back from the lab, we might be closer,” Schneider said.

The museum’s interim director, Brittany Venturella, said the lunar module was one of more than 2,000 artifacts on display or stored at the museum.

Joseph Gutheinz Jr., a former NASA investigator who has helped recover valuable moon rocks brought back from space, called the theft a “shame.” He maintains that those involved were likely not sophisticated thieves and likely had it melted down for its gold value. The auction house that sold the replica given to Aldrin said it weighed 1.8 pounds (0.8 kilograms), or about 29 ounces.

What struck Gutheinz is that the thieves did not steal a large moon rock from the museum that would have far more value on the black market and would be easier to sell.

“To walk by that to go for something else is incredible,” he said.

Wapakoneta is about 90 miles (145 kilometers) northwest of Columbus. Armstrong died in 2012 at the age of 82.

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Ohio Manufacturer For Exposing Employees to Excessive Noise and Other Hazards

August 2, 2018

STOW, OH – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Polystar Inc. – doing business as Polystar Containment – for exposing employees to excessive noise after 12 employees’ audiograms indicated mild to moderate hearing loss at its manufacturing plant in Stow, Ohio. The company faces penalties totaling $331,490.

OSHA conducted an inspection of the facility in response to a complaint. Investigators determined that the company failed to implement an audiometric testing program to monitor employee hearing loss, and controls to reduce noise levels; use machine guards; provide adequate respiratory protection; remove damaged forklifts from use; train workers on hazardous communication; and store flammable materials properly.

“Failing to protect employees from excessive noise can lead to long-term and irreversible hearing loss,” said OSHA Cleveland Area Office Director Howard Eberts. “Employers are required to take appropriate precautions to keep employees safe from well-known hazards.”

The company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Ohio Recycling Company for Safety Violations

COLUMBUS – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Sewing Collection Inc. – a coat hanger recycling company – for serious and repeat safety violations. The Columbus, Ohio-based company faces proposed penalties totaling $190,247.

An inspection in April 2018 found that the company exposed employees to fall, machine guarding, and electrical hazards; failed to train forklift operators; and did not have proper emergency exit signage.

“Employers have a responsibility to conduct workplace hazard assessments regularly to determine appropriate measures at protecting workers’ safety and health,” said OSHA Columbus Area Office Director Larry Johnson. “This company’s failure to comply with federal safety requirements needlessly exposed employees to workplace injuries.”

The company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

Wilmington Man Sentenced to Prison for Fence Scam

August 2, 2018

(CINCINNATI)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine today announced that a Wilmington man has been sentenced to prison and ordered to pay restitution for running a fence scam affecting southwest Ohio consumers.

Phillip R. Sholler Jr., 42, pleaded guilty today to six felony counts of theft, including three counts of theft from the elderly. He was sentenced in the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas to one year in prison and ordered to pay $48,466.50 in restitution.

“We’re committed to protecting Ohio families, and we target scams aggressively,” Attorney General DeWine said. “In this case, people paid thousands of dollars for services they never received. Our goal was to help them and to hold the defendant accountable.”

Sholler, who did business as Shollers Fence LLC, was accused of stealing from six homeowners between July and December 2017. According to investigators, he took cash or checks from the homeowners but never installed the fencing and never delivered any materials.

The case was investigated by the Attorney General’s Economic Crimes Unit and the Evendale Police Department. An attorney with the Economic Crimes Unit was appointed by the Hamilton County Prosecutor to handle the case as a special prosecutor.

Consumers who suspect a scam or unfair sales practice should contact the Ohio Attorney General’s Office at www.OhioProtects.org or 800-282-0515.

Ohio Man Sentenced to Prison for Rape of Juveniles

August 2, 2018

(CAMBRIDGE, Ohio)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced today that a Guernsey County man has been sentenced to spend a decade in prison after pleading guilty to raping two juveniles.

John M. Dugan, 43, of Cambridge pleaded guilty yesterday to two counts of rape and one count of pandering obscenity involving a minor. Guernsey County Common Pleas Judge Daniel Padden sentenced Dugan today to ten years in prison.

Dugan was also classified as a Tier III sex offender.

“We work each day in the Ohio Attorney General’s Office to stand up for children and hold predators accountable,” said Attorney General DeWine. “In addition to prison, this defendant will also be on the sex offender registry for the rest of his life.”

The case was investigated by authorities with the Cambridge Police Department.

The investigation found that Dugan assaulted the victims on separate occasions in 2013 and 2017. Authorities also discovered images of child pornography on the defendant’s cell phone.

The case was prosecuted by attorneys with the Ohio Attorney General’s Special Prosecutions Section as part of Attorney General DeWine’s Crimes Against Children Initiative.

Ohio State wins $3.3 million grant to study kindergarten transition practices

Aug. 3, 2018

Crane Center researchers will gauge impact on child, family, and teacher outcomes

COLUMBUS – The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has awarded a $3.3 million 5-year grant to Ohio State’s Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy to examine the impacts of the Kindergarten-Transition Intervention (KTI), a program focused on 24 specific practices designed to build connections between families and schools.

Crane researchers will use a cluster randomized trial to examine KTI’s effects on children over several years, beginning with their academic and social-behavioral development during preschool. Later, they will examine the children’s adjustments to kindergarten and their trajectories through the end of first grade.

“We are eager to learn more about how well key interventions prepare children for schooling and life—and how we can better support early childhood educators, whose work is already so challenging,” noted Laura Justice, Crane Center’s Executive Director and principal investigator on the study.

“The study is also timely, given the gap in research literature on kindergarten transition practices even while these programs proliferate.”

The study will focus on children in 100 center-based preschools (and their transitions into public school kindergarten programs), facilitated by a partnership with Dayton Preschool Promise and Cleveland-area programs. Crane researchers will follow more than 1,000 children from preschool sites throughout these sites from preschool to the end of their kindergarten year.

The investigators will also conduct a cost study.

“Every child comes to kindergarten with varying levels of academic and social-emotional skills. If we can pinpoint what type of practices can help some of our most at-risk children to arrive at the door better equipped, teachers and parents can make immediate adjustments to help their kids, and policy makers will know what types of programs to invest in,” said Kelly Purtell, assistant professor of human sciences and one of the co-investigators on the project.

“We want to understand if home visits, visits to the kindergarten facility, monthly communication with parents, one-on-one dialogue, and other strategies seem to make a differential impact on children starting kindergarten fully ready,” said Robyn Lightcap, Executive Director of Preschool Promise, Inc.

“We are eager learn what strategies work to help teachers and families give their children a strong start to their public school education.”

Ohio police chief overdosed on drugs taken from evidence room, investigators say

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/ohio-police-chief-overdosed-on-drugs-taken-from-evidence-room-investigators-say/ar-BBLnIXp?ocid=sf

Charges Against Ohio Man for Sexual Assault, Abduction

August 3, 2018

(DEFIANCE, Ohio)— Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced today that a Hicksville man is now facing charges related to the sexual assault and abduction of a pregnant woman.

A Defiance County grand jury indicted Bruce E. Guilford, 63, on felony charges of rape, sexual battery, abduction, and gross sexual imposition. He was arraigned in Defiance County Common Pleas Court this morning.

An investigation by the Ohio Attorney General’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation found that Guilford allegedly assaulted the woman in 2017 when she was seven months pregnant.

“The allegations in this case are terrible,” said Attorney General DeWine. “My office works diligently to stand up for victims of sexual assault, and those who commit these heinous crimes will be held accountable.”

The case is being prosecuted by attorneys with Attorney General DeWine’s Special Prosecutions Section.

Bill Launched by Attorney General’s CyberOhio Initiative Signed into Law

August 3, 2018

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine today released the following statement regarding Senate Bill 220, the Data Protection Act sponsored by State Senators Bob Hackett (R-London) and Kevin Bacon (R-Westerville), being signed into law:

“I congratulate Senator Hackett and Senator Bacon for working with their Senate and House colleagues to pass this important bill and send it to the governor’s desk and commend the governor for signing it into law,” said Attorney General DeWine. “By encouraging Ohio business owners to take appropriate and proven steps to enhance their cybersecurity, Ohioans can be confident that their personal information will be better protected. Companies have even more incentive to invest in strong cyber security controls.”

The Data Protection Act is the first piece of legislation introduced as a result of Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s CyberOhio Initiative. The measure encourages businesses to voluntarily adopt strong cybersecurity controls to protect consumer data. The legislation identifies ten different industry-recognized cybersecurity frameworks on which businesses can base their security programs. The bill previously passed the Ohio Senate on May 16, 2018. The House passed their version of the measure on June 27, 2018 and the Senate voted to concur.

“The Data Protection Act provides an incentive for small business owners to protect themselves from a data breach,” said Allen Perk, CEO of XLN SYSTEMS and member of the CyberOhio Advisory Board. “By completing predominately non-technical tasks along with just a few technical implementations, generally provided by a local computer engineer, small businesses can protect their reputation, their livelihood, and their data from being compromised and do so with only a minor investment of time and money. It’s a win-win for Ohioans and for thousands of Ohio’s small businesses.”

“Greater Cleveland Partnership member companies have increasingly identified cybersecurity as a critical issue and significant challenge,” said Tim Opsitnick, Vice President and General Counsel at Technology Concepts & Design, Inc, Vice Chair of the Greater Cleveland Partnership Government Affairs Council, and Chair of the COSE Small Business Caucus. “We applaud this legislation because it is a voluntary action that recognizes the difficulty businesses have in protecting their ventures, their workforce, and those with whom they do business. In addition, provisions in the bill clearly begin to signal Ohio is ‘open for business’ with blockchain technologies.” Opsitnick is also a member of the CyberOhio Advisory Board.

Launched in September 2016, the goal of CyberOhio is to help foster a legal, technical, and collaborative cybersecurity environment to help Ohio businesses thrive. In addition to promoting legislation, other parts of the initiative include training opportunities for businesses, development of cybersecurity workforce personnel, and expansion of the Ohio Attorney General’s Identity Theft Unit.

The text of the Data Protection Act is available at www.legislature.ohio.gov. More information about the Attorney General’s CyberOhio initiative can be found on www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov.

Hemingway story from 1956 published for first time

By HILLEL ITALIE

AP National Writer

Thursday, August 2

NEW YORK (AP) — The themes and trappings are familiar for an Ernest Hemingway narrative: Paris, wartime, talk of books and wine and the scars of battle.

But the story itself has been little known beyond the scholarly community for decades: “A Room on the Garden Side,” written in 1956, is being published for the first time. The brief, World War II-era fiction appears this week in the summer edition of The Strand Magazine, a literary quarterly which has released obscure works by Raymond Chandler, John Steinbeck and others.

“Hemingway’s deep love for his favorite city as it is just emerging from Nazi occupation is on full display, as are the hallmarks of his prose,” Strand Managing Editor Andrew F. Gulli wrote in an editorial note.

Kirk Curnutt, a board member of The Hemingway Society, contributed an afterword for the Strand, saying that “the story contains all the trademark elements readers love in Hemingway.”

“Steeped in talk of Marcel Proust, Victor Hugo, and Alexandre Dumas, and featuring a long excerpt in French from Charles Baudelaire’s ‘Les Fleurs du Mal,’ the story implicitly wonders whether the heritage of Parisian culture can recover from the dark taint of fascism,” Curnutt wrote.

War was a longtime muse for Hemingway. He served as an ambulance driver during World War I, drawing upon his experiences for his classic novel “A Farewell to Arms.” The Spanish Civil War inspired his novel “For Whom the Bell Tolls.” He was both soldier and correspondent during World War II and was on hand in Paris in August 1944 for the liberation from Nazi occupation, described by the author in reports published soon after by Collier’s magazine.

“A Room on the Garden Side” takes place in the Ritz hotel (Hemingway liked to say that he liberated the Ritz bar) and is narrated by a Hemingway stand-in called Robert who shares the author’s own nickname — Papa. Robert and his entourage drink wine, quote from Baudelaire and debate “the dirty trade of war.”

“I did it to save the lives of people who had not hired out to fight,” the narrator explains. “There was that and the fact that I had learned to know and love an infantry division and wished to serve it in any useful way I could.

“I also loved France and Spain next to my own country. I loved other countries too but the debt was paid and I thought that the account was closed, not knowing the accounts are never closed.”

Hemingway left numerous works unpublished at the time of his suicide, in 1961. “A Moveable Feast,” his celebrated memoir on Paris in the 1920s, came out three years after his death. Other posthumous Hemingway books include the novels “The Garden of Eden” and “Islands in the Stream, and “The Dangerous Summer,” a nonfiction account of bullfighting.

Hemingway wrote other World War II stories over the last decade of his life. In August 1956, he told publisher Charles Scribner Jr. that he had completed five: “A Room on the Garden Side,” ”The Cross Roads,” ”Indian Country and the White Army,” ”The Monument,” and “The Bubble Reputation.” Until now, only “The Cross Roads” had been widely seen.

“I suppose they (the stories) are a little shocking since they deal with irregular troops and combat and with people who actually kill people,” Hemingway told Scribner. “Anyway, you can always publish them after I’m dead.”

On the Internet: www.strandmag.com

FILE – In this July 24, 1969, file photo, the Apollo 11 command module lands in the Pacific Ocean and the crew waits to be picked up by U.S. Navy personnel after an eight day mission to the moon. A solid-gold replica of the Apollo 11 lunar module stolen in July 2017 from an Ohio museum honoring the late astronaut Neil Armstrong has yet to be recovered, a year later. (AP Photo/File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/08/web1_121073761-b1cea5f72d77491aae86792554eca652-1.jpgFILE – In this July 24, 1969, file photo, the Apollo 11 command module lands in the Pacific Ocean and the crew waits to be picked up by U.S. Navy personnel after an eight day mission to the moon. A solid-gold replica of the Apollo 11 lunar module stolen in July 2017 from an Ohio museum honoring the late astronaut Neil Armstrong has yet to be recovered, a year later. (AP Photo/File)

Staff & Wire Reports