Fugitive sought in Ohio


Staff & Wire Reports



This undated image released by the U.S. Marshals Service shows Shawn Richard Christy, who authorities say is accused of threatening President Donald Trump and law enforcement officials. He is being sought in Ohio, where he is believed to have abandoned a stolen truck. (U.S. Marshals Service via AP)

This undated image released by the U.S. Marshals Service shows Shawn Richard Christy, who authorities say is accused of threatening President Donald Trump and law enforcement officials. He is being sought in Ohio, where he is believed to have abandoned a stolen truck. (U.S. Marshals Service via AP)


Man accused of threatening Trump is being sought in Ohio

Monday, September 17

MANSFIELD, Ohio (AP) — Authorities say a Pennsylvania man accused of threatening President Donald Trump and law enforcement officials is being sought in Ohio, where he is believed to have abandoned a stolen truck.

The U.S. Marshals Service says Shawn Richard Christy stole a truck Sunday from the area of McAdoo, Pennsylvania, and fled after abandoning it around 5 p.m. Sunday on Interstate 71 in the Mansfield area of northern Ohio.

Authorities say a federal warrant was issued June 19 for the 27-year-old McAdoo man in connection to Facebook posts threatening to shoot Trump and a district attorney in Pennsylvania. Officials say he also threatened a police chief.

Pennsylvania warrants issued for Christy allege burglary, probation violation and failure to appear for an aggravated assault case.

Authorities say Christy should be considered armed and dangerous.

Murderer due for release next year is captured after escape

By PATRICK WHITTLE

Associated Press

Tuesday, September 18

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A convicted murderer who escaped for a third time from prison has been captured, law enforcement authorities said Tuesday.

A sheriff’s deputy found 65-year-old Arnold Nash walking along a road Tuesday morning in Dover-Foxcroft, in Piscataquis County, state police spokesman Steve McCausland said. He was last seen Thursday evening at the minimum-security unit at Mountain View Correctional Facility in Charleston, several miles down the road from where he was found.

Nash was serving a 45-year sentence for killing his former neighbor in 1991. He was due to be released last year and had previously escaped from Maine Correctional Center in Windham in 1973 and from the Maine State Prison in 1981.

Nash was taken to Piscataquis County Jail, McCausland said. The Maine Department of Corrections will attempt to determine where Nash has been since Thursday night, he said.

“The corrections officials can learn where he has been, and whether our search efforts were close. They were extensive over the weekend,” McCausland said, adding that bloodhounds were used to try to find Nash. “Having that information would be helpful as we prepare for future searches and manhunts.”

Nash has been charged with escape, which is a felony, said Piscataquis County Sheriff Robert Young. He has been transferred to the custody of the Department of Corrections, said Young.

It was unclear on Tuesday morning what Nash’s next stop would be or whether he was represented by a lawyer, he said.

Corrections Commissioner Joseph Fitzpatrick floated the theory on Monday that Nash had spent much of his life in prison and that his escape may have been his way of ensuring he would go back to prison.

But Young said on Tuesday that Nash “wasn’t trying to run, but he wasn’t trying to be caught,” and that the apprehension was a case of a deputy “being in the right place at the right time.”

Fitzpatrick had called on the public to offer any tips they had about Nash’s whereabouts, and stressed that “we do consider Mr. Nash dangerous.”

Nash was due to be released in December 2019, thanks to credits for time served in jail and good behavior. He was convicted of killing the neighbor in North Sullivan, a small community about 145 miles northwest of Portland.

Ohio doctor groups divided over governor’s race endorsement

By JULIE CARR SMYTH

Associated Press

Monday, September 17

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Doctors in Ohio sparred Monday over which candidate in the state’s fall governor’s race is best for health care.

In July, Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine landed the coveted endorsement of the Ohio State Medical Association, the state’s largest and oldest physician group.

In a letter sent Monday, nearly 200 doctors and medical students affiliated with the liberal Physicians Action Network objected to that decision, calling Democrat Richard Cordray the better choice.

“We find it disappointing that the Ohio State Medical Association would reject so many of their own positions and endorse a politician whose career opposes what the association and we as physicians value,” the Cordray backers wrote.

Their letter cited DeWine’s opposition to the federal Affordable Care Act and an earlier statement that the Medicaid expansion would be “unsustainable.” DeWine later clarified that he would preserve the expansion, but with improvements, if elected. That key shift helped secure the medical association’s endorsement.

“While Mike DeWine may have genuinely had a change of heart regarding Medicaid and pre-existing conditions, the importance of the OSMA’s advocacy for doctors and our patients, as well as the fickle nature of politics, requires caution and healthy skepticism,” the network’s doctors wrote.

The dispute comes two days before DeWine and Cordray are set to face off in the first of three gubernatorial debates. The event Wednesday will take place in Dayton, with subsequent debates in Marietta on Oct. 1 and in Cleveland on Oct. 8.

The medical association’s endorsement of DeWine noted DeWine’s long record of public service and the government experience held by his running mate, Secretary of State Jon Husted. It also cited DeWine’s support for increasing treatment options for opioid addiction, lowering prescription drug costs and reducing physicians’ administrative burdens.

Association spokesman Reggie Fields said that group’s PAC is a “deeply diverse” group that found DeWine the superior choice.

“(The PAC’s board) interviewed both major party candidates for governor and discussed with them issues most relevant to the practice of medicine and for assuring access to quality medical care for patients,” Fields said in an email. “The PAC Board believed that Mike DeWine provided clear responses to our questions and outlined an agenda that, if elected, will protect those values.”

Secretary Husted Highlights Efforts to Ensure Security and Integrity of Ohio Elections Ahead of November General

COLUMBUS – Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is reminding voters that Ohio’s election system remains secure heading into the November General Election.

“With another important election on the horizon, the issue of election security will again be on the national agenda,” said Secretary Husted. “However, election security is on our minds 365 days a year as we work with local, state, and federal officials to make sure every available security precaution is in place well in advance of Election Day.”

In June, Secretary Husted announced a $12.2 million dollar investment focused on security improvements and technological advancements. Made possible through funds stemming from the Help America Vote Act (HAVA), the plan includes multiple initiatives to update the Statewide Voter Registration System Database, provide county boards of elections with enhanced cybersecurity safeguards, and conduct post-election audits.

The Secretary of State’s Office recently facilitated five regional security training sessions for election officials across Ohio. Modeled after similar exercises conducted by the Kennedy School of Government’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, the workshops provided boards of elections staff with an opportunity to evaluate their readiness to deal with cyber threats, while also assessing their ability to perform tasks critical to procedural standards.

An additional safeguard in place is that voting machines and tabulation equipment used in Ohio are prohibited from having an internet or network connection. Under state law, all voting equipment must be certified by the federal Election Assistance Commission and the Ohio Board of Voting Machine Examiners. All voting machines undergo pre-election testing and post-election audits are conducted statewide. These practices ensure all voting equipment is ready for use on Election Day and, once an election concludes, ensures election officials that machines performed as expected.

Also worth noting is the fact that Ohio’s 88 county boards of elections are run by bipartisan teams of two democrats and two republicans. These officials work together to administer fair elections at the local level. Additionally, each polling place in Ohio is staffed by an equal number of republicans and democrats. Once polls have closed, cast ballots and memory cards must be returned to the board of elections by both a democrat and republican election official traveling in the same vehicle.

Election Day is Tuesday, November 6.

Preserving Election Integrity – By the Numbers

  • 38,000 Ohioans have registered to vote using the Secretary of State’s website.
  • More than 552,000 voters have updated their registration online.
  • Removed more than 686,000 deceased Ohioans from voter rolls.
  • Now have complete information on 90 percent of voters – up from just 20 percent in 2011.
  • Contacted roughly 2.3 million voters to update information by mail.
  • Secretary Husted has reached out to more than 2.2 million Ohioans who are unregistered, but eligible to vote.
  • Resolved more than 1.9 million duplicate registrations.

This undated image released by the U.S. Marshals Service shows Shawn Richard Christy, who authorities say is accused of threatening President Donald Trump and law enforcement officials. He is being sought in Ohio, where he is believed to have abandoned a stolen truck. (U.S. Marshals Service via AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121386184-d0819db759474465bbf09fe6619ab478.jpgThis undated image released by the U.S. Marshals Service shows Shawn Richard Christy, who authorities say is accused of threatening President Donald Trump and law enforcement officials. He is being sought in Ohio, where he is believed to have abandoned a stolen truck. (U.S. Marshals Service via AP)

Staff & Wire Reports