Gubernatorial candidates healthy


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FILE - In this Sept. 19, 2018, file photo, gubernatorial candidate, Republican Mike DeWine, speaks during a debate with his opponent Democrat Richard Cordray at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. Letters from the physicians of DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray were produced at the request of The Associated Press. The two are in a close, expensive race this fall to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich, who's term-limited. (Ty Greenless/Dayton Daily News via AP, File)

FILE - In this Sept. 19, 2018, file photo, gubernatorial candidate, Republican Mike DeWine, speaks during a debate with his opponent Democrat Richard Cordray at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. Letters from the physicians of DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray were produced at the request of The Associated Press. The two are in a close, expensive race this fall to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich, who's term-limited. (Ty Greenless/Dayton Daily News via AP, File)


FILE - In this Sept. 19, 2018, file photo, gubernatorial candidate, Democrat Richard Cordray, speaks during a debate with Republican Mike DeWine at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. Letters from the physicians of Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine and Cordray were produced at the request of The Associated Press. The two are in a close, expensive race this fall to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich, who's term-limited. (Ty Greenless/Dayton Daily News via AP, File)


Doctors: Ohio governor rivals DeWine, Cordray in good health

By JULIE CARR SMYTH

Associated Press

Tuesday, September 25

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Their doctors say both major-party candidates for Ohio governor are in good health.

Letters from the physicians of Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray were produced at the request of The Associated Press. The two candidates are locked in a close, expensive race this fall to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich, who’s term-limited.

DeWine would be the oldest man elected governor in Ohio, turning 72 a few days before inauguration day in January. Cordray, the former federal consumer watchdog, made a veiled reference to DeWine’s age when calling out the older candidate’s “42 years in politics” in last week’s debate at the University of Dayton. Cordray is 59.

However, DeWine’s doctor, Kevin Sharrett of Xenia, said DeWine “maintains a very healthy lifestyle” and is in “very good” health.

“Mike exercises regularly, spends time with his family, and regularly attends his church — all of which help him manage his stress levels,” Sharrett wrote. “Additionally, Mike has never smoked and does not drink alcohol.”

DeWine publicly disclosed he gets occasional bouts of vertigo after one such incident caused him to cancel a speaking engagement in Cincinnati in 2014. His campaign said he has not had one in years.

Cordray’s doctor, David M. Kennedy of Steward Health Care in Austintown, said the candidate is in “excellent health.” Kennedy said Cordray experiences seasonal allergies and uses a CPAP to control nighttime sleep apnea.

“He takes no medications, but does use a daily multi vitamin,” Kennedy wrote. “He is a well-developed, well-nourished, middle-aged male in no acute distress.”

Both doctors said DeWine and Cordray, respectively, would have no need for activity restrictions if elected.

The AP requested on July 27 that the two candidates’ campaigns produced doctors’ letters containing information on their overall health by Aug. 31. DeWine met the deadline, while Cordray missed it by almost a month. His campaign, which produced its letter Friday, said Cordray was having trouble finding time to get to the doctor.

An AP review of historical information found that DeWine would be the oldest governor in state history and Cordray would be the 10th oldest. Kasich was 58 when he took office in 2011.

The two oldest Ohio governors took office at age 70: William Allen in 1874, who, like DeWine, was a former congressman and U.S. senator; and Civil War hero Andrew Lintner Harris, known as the farmer-statesman, in 1906. The average life expectancy for white males in 1900 was about 47 years, compared to almost 79 years in 2015.

FORMER U.S. ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF EDUCATION DIANE RAVITCH SUPPORTS LOUISE VALENTINE FOR STATE SENATE

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education Diane Ravitch has officially announced her support for Louise Valentine for State Senate and donated $100 to the Valentine for Ohio campaign.

“I’m proud to have the support of renowned education policy expert and public servant Diane Ravitch,” said Louise Valentine. “I am running for State Senate to build a better future for our children, and the foundation of that future is good public education. I’ll never stop fighting for our children and their right to education.”

Ravitch was appointed to public office by Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton and served as Assistant Secretary of Education under Secretary Lamar Alexander. Currently, Ravitch runs her own education blog and helped found The Network for Public Education. She is a graduate of Wellesley College and has an Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Voting Rights Groups Announce Reform Agenda for Ohio

Priorities include voter registration, early voting, use of technology

COLUMBUS — A coalition of Ohio voting rights organizations released a blueprint to protect and expand access to the ballot and modernize the state’s election process. Voting rights advocates released this proactive voting agenda to state policy makers and advocates at a press conference in Columbus.

Under the umbrella of the Ohio Voter Rights Coalition, advocates are encouraging voters and policy makers to consider reforms that will improve access to voting.

“Voting is the foundation of our democracy,” said Mike Brickner, Ohio State Director for All Voting is Local. “It is the right upon which all of our other rights depend. Unfortunately, far too many Ohioans continue to experience barriers to the ballot box, but we have the power to solve this problem. By leveraging technology to make the system more fair and accessible, Ohio officials can strengthen our democracy and ensure everyone can participate.”

During the 2016 election, more than 16 million Americans encountered problems at their polling place — problems that blocked 1.2 million Americans from casting a ballot.

“With November elections on the horizon, it’s imperative that everyone who has the right to vote can exercise that right,” said Camille Wimbish, election administration director, Ohio Voter Rights Coalition. “We’re helping communities, especially communities of color, identify and remedy barriers to the ballot box.”

Ohio ranked behind 20 other states according to a recent Election Performance Index. Advocates aim to improve Ohio’s standing by focusing on the following reforms:

Automated Voter Registration (or agency verification and registration)

Increased early voting opportunities

Improved online voter registration

“We need to take steps now to create an election system that works for all Ohioans,” said Jennifer Miller, executive director, League of Women Voters of Ohio. “We are ready to work with legislators, local election officials, and the Secretary of State’s office to make these reform ideas a reality.”

“Young people are the future of our democracy, and we need to foster their passion and engagement on voting,” said Dylan Sellers, Ohio state coordinator, Campus Vote Project. “Ohio needs to step into the 21st century and adopt reforms that make it easier for all youth to register and cast their ballots.”

To learn more about the agenda, please see the full document and one-page synopsis. These materials can be found by visiting All Voting is Local’s Ohio page at: www.allvotingislocal.org/state/ohio

About the Ohio Voter Rights Coalition

The Ohio Voting Rights Coalition (OVRC) is a non-partisan network of local, state, and national voting advocates. Members supporting this proposal include: All Voting is Local, American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio, Campus Vote Project, Common Cause Ohio, Fair Elections Center, Northeast Ohio Voter Advocates, Ohio Conference NAACP, Ohio Student Association, Policy Matters Ohio, ProgressOhio and The League of Women Voters of Ohio.

All Voting is Local fights for the right to vote through a unique combination of data-driven organizing, advocacy and communications. It is a collaborative campaign housed at The Leadership Conference Education Fund, in conjunction with Access Democracy; the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation; the American Constitution Society; the Campaign Legal Center; and the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

CALENDAR LISTING

CAPA presents AILEY II

Tuesday, November 6, 8 pm

Davidson Theatre (77 S. High St.)

Now touring as part of the “Ailey Ascending” 60th anniversary celebration, the world-renowned dance company Ailey II presents a one-night-only Columbus performance. The critically acclaimed, 12-member ensemble will inspire audiences with performances of Darrell Grand Moultrie’s Road To One; a new commission by South African-born choreographer Bradley Shelver, Where There Are Tongues; and Alvin Ailey’s signature masterpiece, Revelations. Tickets are $21.50-$40 at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.capa.com

Toledo Public Schools’ Mona Al-Hayani Named

2019 Ohio Teacher of the Year

Her passion to nurture and expand the minds and hearts of students helped Mona Al-Hayani become a standout teacher at Toledo Early College High School — and now, she’s earned the title of Ohio’s 2019 Teacher of the Year. In an assembly today, State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria announced the award and surprised Toledo Early College High School students and staff.

“Mona challenges, prepares and empowers her students to become engaged and active members of society — and our cities, our state and our nation are better for it,” said Superintendent DeMaria. “I love the Ohio Teacher of the Year program because it recognizes exceptional teachers like Mona and emphasizes that Ohio is lucky to have so many talented individuals who work hard each day to support our students in their acquisition of knowledge and skills.”

Known by her students as “Ms. Al,” Al-Hayani not only teaches history, but she also advises the National Honor Society and Young Women for Change, a student-led group at her school. A two-time U.S. Department of Education Fulbright-Hays awardee, Al-Hayani traveled around the globe as a teacher leader and researcher.

As the daughter of parents from Iraq and Lebanon, Al-Hayani believes that being an active participant in the democratic process is a responsibility; one that ensures equal rights and an informed citizenry.

Dr. Romules Durant, Superintendent for Toledo Public Schools respects the work that Ms. Al-Hayani has done to educate teachers about human trafficking. “Her training focuses on teaching school practitioners about human trafficking, while the curriculum focuses on the risk factors and teaches youth about human trafficking awareness, social media safety and positive body and mental image,” Durant explained. “Ms. Al-Hayani has trained more than 10,000 individuals on this important topic – a topic that is very relevant in today’s world. She is to be commended for her dedication,” Durant said.

In August, Al-Hayani received the State Board District 2 Teacher of the Year award. She will represent Ohio in the 2019 National Teacher of the Year selection sponsored by the Council of Chief State School Officers.

A native of Toledo, she earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology and a master’s degree in secondary education from the University of Toledo. She also earned her National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification.

About the Ohio Department of Education

The Ohio Department of Education oversees the state’s public education system, which includes public school districts, joint vocational school districts and charter schools. The Department also monitors educational service centers, other regional education providers, early learning and child care programs, and private schools. The Department’s tasks include administering the school funding system, collecting school fiscal and performance data, developing academic standards and model curricula, administering the state achievement tests, issuing district and school report cards, administering Ohio’s voucher programs, providing professional development, and licensing teachers, administrators, treasurers, superintendents and other education personnel. The Department is governed by the State Board of Education with administration of the Department the responsibility of the superintendent of public instruction.

LCVVF Names #OHSEN Candidate Jim Renacci to 2018 Dirty Dozen

Columbus, Ohio — LCV Victory Fund today (Sept. 26) announced that Ohio Senate candidate Jim Renacci will take the fourth spot this year on its signature 2018 Senate Dirty Dozen list for consistently putting polluters ahead of the people in Ohio. Since 1996, the Dirty Dozen has featured some of the most anti-environment candidates running for office across the country in an effort to elect a Congress that will enact pro-environmental and health policies.

Renacci took over $300,000 in oil and gas contributions while repeatedly voting to slash funding to protect clean drinking water, supporting cuts to the EPA that would weaken its ability to enforce clean air, water and public health safeguards, and opposing efforts to restore funding to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. His consistently poor record on the environment as Congressman earned him a three percent lifetime score on LCV’s National Environmental Scorecard.

“Jim Renacci’s votes against protections for clean air, water and public health are proof positive that he cares more about the polluters who fund his campaign than the people of Ohio,” said Pete Maysmith, LCV Victory Fund Senior Vice President for Campaigns. “We are naming Renacci to our Dirty Dozen list to ensure that every Ohio voter who goes to the polls on Election Day knows about his record of putting polluters over people.”

“Ohio has a bipartisan tradition of conservation that Jim Renacci has consistently failed to live up to,” said Aryeh Alex from Conservation Ohio. “The local threats to our water, air and public health are higher than ever — and we need a senator who will stand up to polluters, not carry their water.”

As part of ongoing efforts to defeat Renacci, LCV Victory Fund and USW Works are running a field program that will reach 58,500 voters through canvassing and direct mail in Cincinnati and surrounding Hamilton County. That effort is through the joint New American Jobs Fund.

LCV Action Fund endorsed Senator Sherrod Brown in March, praising him for leading efforts to create clean energy jobs and protect our air and water, including the Great Lakes.

Ohio Cities with the Best Income Equality

The team at HomeArea.com created the Ohio Cities with the Best Income Equality (Graphic). based on the newly released Census Bureau data of cities with a population of 60,000 or more.

Income inequality is measured on a scale from 0 to 100 using the Gini Coefficient. Lower values indicate that household income is more evenly distributed on a pre-tax basis. In the U.S., it typically falls in the range of 30-65. Other countries range from high inequality like in Brazil (50s) to high equality like in Sweden (30s).

Here is the list of cities from best income equality to worst:

1. Parma, OH 38.1

2. Columbus, OH 43.7

3. Toledo, OH 45.9

4. Lorain, OH 48.2

5. Canton, OH 49.2

6. Akron, OH 49.3

7. Dayton, OH 49.7

8. Youngstown, OH 49.7

9. Cleveland, OH 50.5

10. Cincinnati, OH 53.4

Columbus Sailor Returns Home after Middle East Deployment

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jerry Jimenez, Navy Office of Community Outreach

MAYPORT, Fla. – A 2015 Central Crossing High School graduate and Columbus, Ohio, native is one of 1,200 sailors who recently returned to Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment aboard USS Iwo Jima.

Seaman Casey Davis is a Navy operations specialist aboard the Iwo Jima, an amphibious assault ship, who recently deployed to the Middle East and Mediterranean areas of operation. For more than half of the sailors aboard Iwo Jima, the six-month journey served as their first deployment, according to Navy officials.

New Study Shows Alternative Medicine Helps Patients Undergoing Cancer Treatment

Cancer treatment is known to have many side effects on the patient including significant discomfort, pain and anxiety that can make it difficult for patients to tolerate. Brachytherapy, a form of treatment that delivers radiation straight to the tumor inside of the body is proven very effective for several types of cancer but is no exception when it comes to side effects.

To ease the burden of side effects on patients, researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center found that aromatherapy and reflexology are an effective way to reduce pain and anxiety that does not involve another pill or procedure.

In a recent study published in the journal of Oncology Nurse Advisor, cervical cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy received essential oil aromatherapy and 30 minutes of foot reflexology prior to their treatment sessions.

Preliminary results show :

Patient-reported pain levels were reduced by 60% and anxiety decreased by 20%.

Patients required about 40% less pain medication during the procedure than those who didn’t receive these therapies.

These integrative therapy sessions have virtually no side effects.

Crash Reduction Effort Underway In Columbus

COLUMBUS – The Columbus Division of Police, the Ohio Department of Transportation and the Ohio State Highway Patrol have launched a cooperative program to raise traffic safety awareness and reduce crashes in the Columbus metropolitan region.

In the first eight months of 2018, 65 fatal crashes claimed 68 lives in Franklin County. During the same time, 15,616 traffic crashes occurred in Columbus including 4,219 injury and 48 fatal crashes. Many of these crashes occur in high-density traffic areas, such as intersections, interstates and construction zones. Increased visibility and enforcement will focus on crash-causing violations in these identified areas.

Excessive speed remains a leading factor in work zone-related crashes. In addition to enforcement, ODOT will utilize overhead message boards to remind Columbus drivers to slow down.

Impaired driving continues to play a significant role in deadly crashes, accounting for one in four fatal crashes in the region. Other crash-causing violations include failure to yield, following too closely, and improper lane changes or passing and distracted driving.

Roadway safety is a shared responsibility. Everyone can contribute to safer roads by following traffic laws, always wearing seatbelts and never driving while impaired.

Ohio State awards highest philanthropic honors

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Two families who have distinguished themselves as generous and committed Ohio State supporters were recognized last week with the university’s highest awards for philanthropy and volunteerism.

The Crane family received the Everett D. Reese Medal, the university’s highest honor in recognition of exceptional service in private philanthropy. Thekla “Teckie” and Don Shackelford received the John B. Gerlach Sr. Development Volunteer Award, which rewards those who show the utmost dedication and personal investment in university fundraising efforts.

“The impact of the Cranes and Shackelfords reaches each and every part of our university community,” said President Michael V. Drake. “Ohio State would not be complete without these families.”

The Cranes are well-known in central Ohio as selfless and strategic community partners. In addition to providing financial support, the family gives generously of their time, offering countless hours of personal leadership and service on numerous nonprofit and civic boards. This community support is also embraced by members of Crane Group, the family’s 70-year-old private holding and management company based in Columbus.

The Cranes’ Buckeye-laden family tree is still growing. There are at least 11 alumni among its branches, including Loann Crane ’47 and the late Robert S. Crane ’46; Jameson Crane ’47, a former Ohio State football player and chairman emeritus of Crane Group; Tanny Crane ’78, current president and CEO of Crane Group; Mike Crane, JD ’78, executive vice president of Crane Group; and Rob Crane, MD, an associate professor of family medicine at Ohio State; and there are two family members currently attending.

Notably, 30 individuals representing three generations of the family pledged $13.5 million to Ohio State in 2013 to establish the Jameson Crane Sports Medicine Institute, fund the Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, and create the Loann Crane Advanced Language Institute.

Teckie Shackelford and her husband, Don, are passionate about their pets, and incredibly generous in their support of Ohio State. The Shackelfords became clients of the Veterinary Medical Center in 1989 and made their first gift to the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1996. Their philanthropic contributions include the creation of the Teckie R. and Don B. Shackelford Professorship (and now Chair) in Canine Medicine, and The Jane, Lily, and Bubba Shackelford Lobby of the Veterinary Medical Center Hummel and Trueman Hospital for Companion Animals. Don and Teckie named the emergency and community practice lobby in honor of their dogs.

Teckie’s connection to Ohio State has deep roots, with her father, Everett D. Reese, establishing the President’s Club in 1963. The Reese Medal is named for him. Teckie served as a director of Ohio State’s Foundation Board from 1994 to 2009, and remains the only female chair in its history. Her service has previously been honored with the Alumni Association Citizenship Award in 1991, the Reese Medal in 2000 and The Ohio State University Distinguished Service Award in 2001. Don Shackelford delivered Ohio State’s Summer Commencement address in 1998.

“The Cranes and Shackelfords represent the very best of the Buckeye spirit of paying forward. Their selfless contributions have changed so many lives for the better,” said Michael C. Eicher, senior vice president for advancement and president of The Ohio State University Foundation. “Ohio State is proud to call them friends and family, and honored that they have chosen us to help carry out their mission to improve our world.”

FILE – In this Sept. 19, 2018, file photo, gubernatorial candidate, Republican Mike DeWine, speaks during a debate with his opponent Democrat Richard Cordray at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. Letters from the physicians of DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray were produced at the request of The Associated Press. The two are in a close, expensive race this fall to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich, who’s term-limited. (Ty Greenless/Dayton Daily News via AP, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121440948-e01b8dfbf47b4033a3442d0789e4397d.jpgFILE – In this Sept. 19, 2018, file photo, gubernatorial candidate, Republican Mike DeWine, speaks during a debate with his opponent Democrat Richard Cordray at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. Letters from the physicians of DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray were produced at the request of The Associated Press. The two are in a close, expensive race this fall to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich, who’s term-limited. (Ty Greenless/Dayton Daily News via AP, File)

FILE – In this Sept. 19, 2018, file photo, gubernatorial candidate, Democrat Richard Cordray, speaks during a debate with Republican Mike DeWine at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. Letters from the physicians of Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine and Cordray were produced at the request of The Associated Press. The two are in a close, expensive race this fall to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich, who’s term-limited. (Ty Greenless/Dayton Daily News via AP, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121440948-5bf01b52fbe04cfe9a7a179e69b44c15.jpgFILE – In this Sept. 19, 2018, file photo, gubernatorial candidate, Democrat Richard Cordray, speaks during a debate with Republican Mike DeWine at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. Letters from the physicians of Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine and Cordray were produced at the request of The Associated Press. The two are in a close, expensive race this fall to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich, who’s term-limited. (Ty Greenless/Dayton Daily News via AP, File)
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