Ky. Kroger shooting


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A Kroger employee wipes away tears following a shooting that left two people dead, and the subject in custody, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Jeffersontown, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

A Kroger employee wipes away tears following a shooting that left two people dead, and the subject in custody, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Jeffersontown, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)


Members of the Louisville Metro Police Department talk inside a Kroger grocery in Jeffersontown, Ky., following a shooting that left two people dead, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)


Jeffersontown Police Chief Sam Rogers speaks to the media during a press conference, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Jeffersontown, Ky. A shooting at a Kroger grocery left two people dead, and the suspect in custody. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)


Police: Shooting suspect tried to access black church

By DYLAN LOVAN

Associated Press

Friday, October 26

JEFFERSONTOWN, Ky. (AP) — A white man with a history of violence and mental illness was recorded on surveillance video apparently trying to get inside a predominantly black church in Kentucky before he went to a grocery store and fatally shot two African-Americans, police said.

After releasing a photo of the suspect, authorities received a tip from an employee of the city of Jeffersontown who said he thought he saw Gregory Bush outside the First Baptist church prior to Wednesday’s shooting, city police chief Sam Rogers said. The video confirmed Bush’s presence, Rogers said. The church is headed by a black pastor and has a large African-American membership.

Bush “appeared to try to gain access to the church,” Rogers said.

The information came as news media outlets reported that Bush made a racial comment after the deadly shooting at a Kroger in Jeffersontown, a city of about 26,600 people on the outskirts of Louisville.

Rogers said it was too soon, however, to say whether the shooting was racially motivated.

“I can’t speculate on motive at this time,” the chief said at a news conference Thursday. “We are pursuing all avenues of the investigation no matter where that takes us or what it involves.”

The FBI announced that it “is evaluating the evidence to determine if there were any violations of federal law.” Hate crimes are prosecuted under federal law.

Rogers also said Bush apparently does have a history of mental illness, as news outlets have reported.

An arrest report says Bush walked into the Kroger, pulled a gun from his waist and shot a man in the back of the head, then kept shooting him multiple times “as he was down on the floor.” The report says Bush then reholstered his gun, walked outside and killed a woman in the parking lot. Each victim died of multiple gunshot wounds, Rogers said.

A man carrying a concealed weapon who happened to be in the parking lot challenged Bush, and police say the suspect then “began firing wildly” at him, putting other shoppers in the parking lot in danger. Neither man was hurt in that confrontation, Rogers said.

Bystander video shows a white man in a distinctive neon-yellow shirt trying to drive away while an officer chases after him on foot. Many more officers converged on the scene and made the arrest just a few hundred yards (meters) from the store on Wednesday afternoon.

Bush was jailed on $5 million bond Thursday on two counts of murder and 10 counts of felony wanton endangerment.

Ed Harrell was quoted by the Courier Journal of Louisville as saying he was waiting on his wife in the parking lot when he heard gunshots and grabbed his revolver. As he crouched down, he said he saw the gunman walk “nonchalantly” by with a gun by his side. Harrell said he called out to ask what was going on, and the gunman replied: “Don’t shoot me. I won’t shoot you. Whites don’t shoot whites.”

Rogers said police “are aware of that statement and are evaluating any factors that may come into play with” it.

He said he had “no direct knowledge” of whether there was more than one armed bystander at the scene.

The local coroner’s office identified the victims as Maurice Stallard, 69, and Vicki Lee Jones, 67. Police said there didn’t appear to be any connection between Bush and the victims, or any link between Bush and the Kroger store.

Stallard’s 12-year-old grandson was shopping with him in the store when he was gunned down, Jeffersontown Mayor Bill Dieruf said Thursday. The boy was physically unharmed, but most certainly traumatized, the mayor said, adding, “He was there and cannot unsee what he has seen.”

Stallard was the father of Kellie Watson, the chief racial equity officer for Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer.

The mayor shared his outrage Thursday over what he called an “epidemic of gun violence” that “hit close to home.”

“People getting shot at a grocery store, a school, outside a church. Can’t we all agree that that is unacceptable?” said Fischer, a Democrat running for re-election.

Authorities removed computers and cellphones from the house where Bush lived with his parents.

Bush’s criminal record shows he threatened his ex-wife and punched a deputy sheriff during a family court hearing years ago. He also was charged with assaulting his elderly parents in January 2009.

An arrest citation said Bush’s parents were punched and choked, and they told police they were “terrified of (his) unpredictable behavior.”

BBB Center for Character Ethics Announces the 2018 Torch Awards for Ethics Recipients

Columbus, Ohio (October 26, 2018) – Better Business Bureau (BBB) Center for Character Ethics will celebrate its Torch Awards for Ethics annual program by recognizing three outstanding organizations that have been selected as the 2018 recipients. The recipients will be honored at a luncheon event held at The Ohio State University on Tuesday, November 13.

“These businesses and nonprofit organization have all stood out as being very intentional about exceeding marketplace standards for ethics. Additionally, they have all conveyed the importance of the application process and evaluating themselves against the six Principles of Trust,” said Kip Morse, President & CEO of BBB Serving Central Ohio.

Recipients of the 2018 Torch Awards include:

  • E.E. Ward Moving & Storage Co.: The oldest African-American owned business in the United States, E.E. Ward has evolved into an award-winning moving corporation that fosters growth and innovation.
  • Westerville Area Chamber of Commerce: A professional organization that advocates for pro-business issues in the community, the Westerville Area Chamber of commerce has worked toward enhancing the economic, civil and cultural growth of the Westerville Area for over 50 years.
  • Home Care Assistance: Offering a specialized approach to home care and a focus on creating an expert team, Home Care Assistance provides premier in-home senior care.
  • Ten Students of Integrity Scholarship Recipients from high schools throughout Central Ohio and the 2018 Spark Award recipients will also be recognized at the luncheon.

Founded in 1994, the national award-winning “educate & recognize” program is the premier public recognition of organizations that intentionally pursue the six TRUST! Principles. The award embodies BBB’s mission of advancing marketplace trust by honoring companies whose leaders demonstrate a high level of personal character and ensure that the organization’s practices meet the highest standards of ethics, and consequently generate trust. These companies generate a high level of trust among their employees, customers and their communities.

This luncheon will feature a keynote from two-time Heisman trophy winner, Archie Griffin.

Visit bbb.torchaward.com to register for this year’s BBB Torch Awards for Ethics Luncheon and learn what it takes to rise above the rest and become a Champion of Trust.

For more information, follow your BBB on Facebook, Twitter, and at bbb.org.

About BBB

For more than 100 years, Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands and charities they can trust. In 2017, people turned to BBB more than 160 million times for BBB Business Profiles on more than 5.2 million businesses and 11,000 Charity Reports, all available for free at bbb.org. There are local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada and Mexico, including BBB Serving Central Ohio, which serves 21 counties.

About BBB Center for Character Ethics

BBB’s Center for Character Ethics’ mission is to provide character ethics assessment, training and recognition to for-profit and nonprofit leaders. The Center also provides K-12 character development opportunities through the its Future Leaders Program.

Opinion: Fighting Pain and Addiction for Veterans

By Robert Wilkie

InsideSources.com

Last year, more than 130 Americans died each day from a drug overdose involving an opioid. Veterans are twice as likely to die of the same. But there is some good news: The Department of Veterans Affairs is a recognized leader in pain management and opioid safety, and its success in reducing the use of opioids can be emulated by other health systems through VA’s proven strategies.

Severe pain is 40 percent more common in veterans compared to non-veterans. Nearly 60 percent of veterans who have served in the Middle East and more than 50 percent of older veterans live with some form of chronic pain.

I saw the effects of severe, chronic pain on my father when he returned from Vietnam severely wounded and still recovering after a year in military hospitals. Many veterans like my father suffer chronic pain for the rest of their lives, and the risk of suicide is particularly high among veterans and others who face chronic pain.

Fortunately, VA has taken a multi-faceted approach called the Opioid Safety Initiative to reduce the need for opioids. Since its launch, the program managed a 45 percent reduction in veteran patients receiving opioids from July 2012 to June 2018. That’s more than 300,000 fewer veterans on opioids. The same program in the same months reduced veterans on long-term opioid therapy by 51 percent and veterans on high-dose opioid therapy by 66 percent.

In addition to systemwide oversight of prescribing of opioids, the initiative has brought pharmacists and prescribers together to educate one another on the problem of identifying the best treatment for each veteran in pain.

Opioids have a place among treatment options. They are powerful drugs that can be used to alleviate pain, and any reduction in their use must be done carefully. Otherwise, patients could be driven to crisis by both the effects of withdrawal and ineffective pain management.

Decisions on the use of opioids must therefore take a whole health approach to care, with the aim of not just reducing opioids but also improving functioning by patients. It takes time and attention from providers to have meaningful conversations with patients about what their life goals are, and provide education about what they can reasonably expect from treatment.

This approach uses the stepped care model based on a continuum of care and incorporating professional support and self-management through counseling and participation in groups like Narcotics Anonymous. It also includes non-pharmacological pain treatment options like stress reduction, yoga, tai chi, mindfulness, chiropractic care, nutrition, acupuncture and health coaching, which may reduce reliance on opioids without increasing pain or causing other health problems.

Virtually all VA facilities have reduced prescriptions for opioids. VA facilities in El Paso, Texas, and Fayetteville, N.C., have managed the greatest reductions, cutting rates by 71 percent in El Paso and 69 percent in Fayetteville.

Rates for other VA facilities can be viewed online since January, when VA became the first hospital system in the country to begin posting its opioid prescribing rates online, updating them twice yearly in January and July.

We expect even better management of pain medications for veterans when VA and the Department of Defense roll out their new integrated electronic health records. The new records system will give health care providers a full picture of patient medical history, enabling better treatment and better clinical outcomes. It will also help us better identify veterans at higher risk for opioid addiction and suicide, so health care providers can intervene earlier and save lives.

We have also issued the lifesaving drug Naloxone to more than 100,000 veterans to help prevent tragedies and instituted patient risk assessments for overdose and suicide, bringing the power of big-data analytics to bear through VA’s Stratification Tool for Opioid Risk Mitigation, which puts predictive analytics in the hands of providers and allows effective collaboration of medical and mental care of veterans at risk.

There is still more to learn and more to do, and a national solution will require national collaboration. But President Trump has said, “We can be the generation that ends the opioid epidemic.” He is right about that. We can end the epidemic, and VA is helping lead the way.

ABOUT THE WRITER

Robert Wilkie is the secretary of Veterans Affairs. He wrote this for InsideSources.com.

The Conversation

Alzheimer’s disease: mounting evidence that herpes virus is a cause

October 19, 2018

Author: Ruth Itzhaki, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Neurobiology, University of Manchester

Disclosure statement: Ruth Itzhaki does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners: University of Manchester provides funding as a member of The Conversation UK.

More than 30 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer’s disease – the most common form of dementia. Unfortunately, there is no cure, only drugs to ease the symptoms. However, my latest review, suggests a way to treat the disease. I found the strongest evidence yet that the herpes virus is a cause of Alzheimer’s, suggesting that effective and safe antiviral drugs might be able to treat the disease. We might even be able to vaccinate our children against it.

The virus implicated in Alzheimer’s disease, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), is better known for causing cold sores. It infects most people in infancy and then remains dormant in the peripheral nervous system (the part of the nervous system that isn’t the brain and the spinal cord). Occasionally, if a person is stressed, the virus becomes activated and, in some people, it causes cold sores.

We discovered in 1991 that in many elderly people HSV1 is also present in the brain. And in 1997 we showed that it confers a strong risk of Alzheimer’s disease when present in the brain of people who have a specific gene known as APOE4.

The virus can become active in the brain, perhaps repeatedly, and this probably causes cumulative damage. The likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s disease is 12 times greater for APOE4 carriers who have HSV1 in the brain than for those with neither factor.

Later, we and others found that HSV1 infection of cell cultures causes beta-amyloid and abnormal tau proteins to accumulate. An accumulation of these proteins in the brain is characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.

We believe that HSV1 is a major contributory factor for Alzheimer’s disease and that it enters the brains of elderly people as their immune system declines with age. It then establishes a latent (dormant) infection, from which it is reactivated by events such as stress, a reduced immune system and brain inflammation induced by infection by other microbes.

Reactivation leads to direct viral damage in infected cells and to viral-induced inflammation. We suggest that repeated activation causes cumulative damage, leading eventually to Alzheimer’s disease in people with the APOE4 gene.

Presumably, in APOE4 carriers, Alzheimer’s disease develops in the brain because of greater HSV1-induced formation of toxic products, or less repair of damage.

New treatments?

The data suggest that antiviral agents might be used for treating Alzheimer’s disease. The main antiviral agents, which are safe, prevent new viruses from forming, thereby limiting viral damage.

In an earlier study, we found that the anti-herpes antiviral drug, acyclovir, blocks HSV1 DNA replication, and reduces levels of beta-amyloid and tau caused by HSV1 infection of cell cultures.

It’s important to note that all studies, including our own, only show an association between the herpes virus and Alzheimer’s – they don’t prove that the virus is an actual cause. Probably the only way to prove that a microbe is a cause of a disease is to show that an occurrence of the disease is greatly reduced either by targeting the microbe with a specific anti-microbial agent or by specific vaccination against the microbe.

Excitingly, successful prevention of Alzheimer’s disease by use of specific anti-herpes agents has now been demonstrated in a large-scale population study in Taiwan. Hopefully, information in other countries, if available, will yield similar results.

The Conversation

Why there may be thousands of stink bugs hiding under your sofa

October 28, 2018

Author: Rosa da Silva, Assistant Professor, McMaster University

Disclosure statement: Rosa da Silva does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners: McMaster University provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation CA.

It’s that time of the year when mornings are met with crisp autumn air, when scarlet and amber leaves crunch beneath your feet and when restaurant menus are filled with everything pumpkin spice.

We may welcome the pitter-patter of trick-or-treaters knocking at our doors, but there are also unexpected and unappreciated guests sneaking into our homes: stink bugs, ladybugs and other insects.

What draws these creepy crawlers into our attics and kitchen cupboards, and to the space beneath our furniture?

Not only are outdoor temperatures becoming colder, but days are getting shorter. Insects detect and respond to these temperature and light cues in preparation for winter. It’s an essential adaptive response since these insects are not able to cope with the cold.

Insects take on some of the most creative survival strategies. As the leader of the Stink Bug Project, I’ve seen how the invasive brown marmorated stink bug has overcome the challenges of our colder climate. Moving indoors during the winter has helped it spread across North America.

Head south or stick it out

Some insects, like monarch butterflies, pack up and migrate to warmer climates. Others stick around and brave it through the winter.

Those that can survive outdoors may enter a type of hibernation referred to as diapause. These insects burrow into leaf litter, under loose bark and in some cases at the bottom of ponds or lakes that do not completely freeze over.

The bodies of these insects will engage in biochemical changes. For example, some of these outdoor-dwelling insects may be able to resist freezing to death by producing special antifreeze proteins in their blood that prevent ice crystals from forming in their bodies and, by the end of a winter season, prevent tissue damage as a whole.

Remarkably, some insects such as the woolly bear caterpillar are able to freeze solid during the winter as they tolerate the formation of ice crystals in their body. They accomplish this feat by using alcohol-based molecules to control where and how fast ice crystals form in their bodies. This strategy causes minimal damage to their cell membranes and cells as a whole.

Then there are the insects like the brown marmorated stink bug that adapt to cold temperatures by seeking shelter in human-made structures. This can include hiding in our garages, sheds and, perhaps most disturbing, in our very own homes.

Insect roommates

It’s not uncommon to find an occasional insect or spider crawling around in our homes. Towards the fall, it becomes increasingly likely that you will be awash in unwanted guests sneaking into your home through openings you might not know about. As winter sets in, these insects tend to stay put and remain inside.

Western conifer seed bugs, box elder bugs, ladybugs, cluster flies, stink bugs and many others like to move into our homes for the winter. As they do, they often secrete chemical signals called pheromones to attract more of their counterparts to the hibernation house party.

It can be quite scary for home owners to come across a large mass of insects that have set up shop for the winter. I once visited a home where there were thousands of hibernating stink bugs tucked away under a sofa in the sun porch.

While these insects are unlikely to cause a problem during the winter months (they mostly remain out of plain sight), you might start to notice them on warm sunny winter days and, as spring approaches, when temperature and sunlight cues break the insect’s diapause.

That’s when insects start trying to get outdoors to continue their life cycle in the more pleasant spring and summer seasons. As a result, it’s pretty typical to see insects clinging to your windows, looking for a way out of your house.

No vacancy

As we head toward winter, homeowners can minimize the number of fall invaders by engaging in a few proactive home checks.

One of the most important things that a homeowner can do is to be sure that any cracks or crevices on the exterior are filled. Check for spaces along the roof, doors, windows and siding panels, around any wire or cable openings that extend indoors, and install insect screening on attic vents.

While it may still be possible that some of these cold-avoiding insects will make it indoors, these preventative measures should significantly cut down on the number of unwanted insect house guests.

Insects, however, are incredible organisms. They deal with oncoming changes in the winter season by engaging in many overwintering strategies that include, in the simplest of ways, seeking refuge in a cozy home.

While increased vigilance might minimize the number of insects in our homes, it is certainly quite possible that our winter roommates are here to stay.

And remember the next time you are home on a chilly autumn night, it’s unlikely that you are ever alone!

Comments

Joseph Hutter, logged in via Google: Thank you for the piece you wrote on stinkbugs. I live in Central Pennsylvania in farm country but very close to the woods. I experienced tomato damage from these pests and they swarm the house trying to get in at the end of summer. I did seal up all I could and only a couple dozen got in this year. Guess I have to be more vigilant in protecting my tomato plants and such. I can’t stand these bugs! Good luck to you

Oh, I forgot to say that I think I have 2 kinds of these bugs. Mostly brown ones and the occasional green. Thanks

A Kroger employee wipes away tears following a shooting that left two people dead, and the subject in custody, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Jeffersontown, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121650444-30aabde68f4341509df0f93fe3439225.jpgA Kroger employee wipes away tears following a shooting that left two people dead, and the subject in custody, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Jeffersontown, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Members of the Louisville Metro Police Department talk inside a Kroger grocery in Jeffersontown, Ky., following a shooting that left two people dead, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121650444-91a42c98079842ce8fd9eef014895008.jpgMembers of the Louisville Metro Police Department talk inside a Kroger grocery in Jeffersontown, Ky., following a shooting that left two people dead, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Jeffersontown Police Chief Sam Rogers speaks to the media during a press conference, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Jeffersontown, Ky. A shooting at a Kroger grocery left two people dead, and the suspect in custody. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121650444-413c56d988aa4cefbe8c1dfc07c66754.jpgJeffersontown Police Chief Sam Rogers speaks to the media during a press conference, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Jeffersontown, Ky. A shooting at a Kroger grocery left two people dead, and the suspect in custody. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
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