Knife attack at Lucasville


OHIO NEWS

STAFF & WIRE REPORTS



In this screenshot taken from a Southern Ohio Correction Facility security camera video four inmates, handcuffed to a table, are attacked by a fellow prisoner who slipped his handcuffs and brandished a knife, Sunday, June 4, 2017, at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, Ohio. (Southern Ohio Correction Facility via AP)

In this screenshot taken from a Southern Ohio Correction Facility security camera video four inmates, handcuffed to a table, are attacked by a fellow prisoner who slipped his handcuffs and brandished a knife, Sunday, June 4, 2017, at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, Ohio. (Southern Ohio Correction Facility via AP)


In this Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 photo, fences line the exterior of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility, in Lucasville, Ohio. A newly released video of a 2017 attack between inmates at the facility obtained by The Associated Press reveals for the first time the extent of the victims' injuries and raises questions about how the bloody attack happened inside one of Ohio's most secure prisons. A fellow inmate slipped out of his cuffs and allegedly stabbed Shamieke Pugh and three other inmates multiple times as they sat handcuffed to a table and were unable to defend themselves. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)


In this Monday, Dec. 31, 2018 photo, Shamieke Pugh discusses injuries he suffered in 2017 when a fellow inmate at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville slipped out of his cuffs and allegedly stabbed Pugh and three other inmates multiple times as they sat handcuffed to a table and were unable to defend themselves, in Delaware, Ohio. A recently released video of the attack obtained by The Associated Press reveals for the first time the extent of the victims' injuries and raises questions about how the bloody attack happened inside one of Ohio's most secure prisons. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)


Video shows brutality of knife attack on helpless inmates

By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS

Associated Press

Friday, January 25

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A newly released video shows the brutality of an Ohio inmate’s knife attack on four other prisoners who were handcuffed to a table and unable to defend themselves.

The video obtained by The Associated Press reveals for the first time the extent of the victims’ injuries and raises questions about how the bloody attack happened inside the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, one of Ohio’s most secure prisons. Additional security concerns were raised months later when the same prisoner was allegedly involved in a knife attack that left a guard severely injured and hospitalized for months.

Shamieke Pugh was one of the four inmates in the first attack on June 4, 2017.

“He was trying to kill us, for sure,” said Pugh, who is now out of prison and recovering from multiple stab wounds in his arm, chest and back. The four prisoners were playing cards during an out-of-cell recreation period.

Pugh, 28, believes guards set up the attack, something the prison system, the guards’ union and the prosecutor who brought charges against the attacker strongly deny.

Consistent national data on inmate-on-inmate assaults is difficult to come by, but prisons can be dangerous places, with one in five inmates reporting attacks. In Ohio, a 2016 legislative prison inspection committee found that the Lucasville prison has traditionally had high assault statistics in part because of gang-affiliated prisoners.

In the video, inmate Greg Reinke, the alleged attacker, is seen stabbing Pugh and three other prisoners multiple times during the assault that could have been even worse had one of the victims not freed himself and fought back. Reinke hid two homemade knives on himself and used one of them — a 7-inch shank — in the assault.

Just under a minute passes before the first guard appears at the end of a long hallway and charges toward the attacker in the video obtained by the AP through an open records request. More than three minutes pass before guards free the last of the inmates from their cuffs chained to a blood-drenched table.

Reinke “stated that he just felt like killing someone,” according to a prison report after the attack.

The following day, authorities declined to prosecute Reinke, arguing that he was already serving a life sentence. Reinke was convicted of aggravated murder in a 2004 shooting in Cleveland.

Then, just over eight months later on Feb. 20, Reinke and a second inmate were accused of assaulting guard Matthew Matthias in the prison infirmary. Mathias suffered 32 stab wounds and numerous internal injuries in that attack and has still not returned to work.

Newly elected Scioto County prosecutor Shane Tieman changed course and charged Reinke with both prison attacks. Reinke has pleaded not guilty.

Tieman called the video “quite disturbing” and said he was bothered by the delay in the guards’ response. But Tieman said he wasn’t going to second-guess the actions of the guards that day. He also saw no evidence of a setup.

The point of bringing charges against Reinke was to send a message that such crimes won’t be tolerated, and hopefully to draw attention to security issues in the prisons. The inmates who were stabbed, though offenders themselves, deserve justice, Tieman said.

“These victims deserve their day in court too,” Tieman said. “To say, ‘This was done to me,’ and for us to stand up and say, ‘It is not right, what was done to these victims.’”

Authorities haven’t determined a motive for the attack on the prisoners, and Tieman said there was no evidence of a racial element. Reinke is white and the four inmates are black. Reinke’s attorney declined comment on the video.

Prison officials won’t say how Reinke slipped his cuffs and how he was able to smuggle two shanks out of his cell. The delay in freeing the inmates after the attack happened because their restraints “became entangled when inmates were moving around during the attack,” prisons spokeswoman JoEllen Smith said.

Lucasville ended the practice of shackling multiple inmates seated at a table after the incident, according to the union that represents Ohio’s prison guards. The union reached an agreement with the Lucasville prison in April requiring increased security requirements for moving dangerous inmates.

The union continues to talk with officials about improving security. But no system can prevent opportunities for violence, said Christopher Mabe, president of the Ohio Civil Service Employees Association.

“There’s no such thing as an inmate being locked in a cell, no matter what the security status is, for 24 hours, seven days a week,” he said. “That’s not what we do.”

No guards involved in the incident were disciplined.

Reinke, 38, is now housed in the state’s supermax, high-security prison in Youngstown.

The other inmate involved in the attack on the guard, Casey Pigge, was also transferred to Youngstown.

Pigge is a three-time convicted killer who had boasted about strangling a fellow inmate on a prison van while they were being transported. He also is serving time for killing a cellmate with a brick in 2016 and killing his girlfriend’s mother in 2008.

Andrew Welsh-Huggins can be reached on Twitter at https://twitter.com/awhcolumbus.

Ohio governor delays execution, orders look at other drugs

By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS

Associated Press

Friday, January 25

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Gov. Mike DeWine on Friday delayed next month’s execution of a condemned Ohio man and ordered the prison system to look at alternative lethal injection drugs.

The announcement by the Republican governor followed a federal judge’s ruling this month that said Ohio’s current execution protocol could cause the inmate “severe pain and needless suffering.”

Warren Keith Henness was scheduled to die by lethal injection Feb. 13 at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville.

Henness was convicted of killing 51-year-old Richard Myers in Columbus in 1992. Authorities say Myers had been helping Henness find a drug treatment for his wife.

DeWine’s order raises new questions about Ohio’s troubled death penalty system, including the possibility of an additional round of delays lasting months or years.

It took Ohio more than three years to establish its current three-drug lethal injection protocol, in part because of the difficulty many states have had finding drugs. The state carried out the first execution under the current system in 2017.

The drug scarcity occurred over the past decade as multiple manufacturers and distributors put their drugs off limits for executions.

The first drug in Ohio’s system, the sedative midazolam, has also been subject to lawsuits that argue it exposes inmates to the possibility of severe pain because it doesn’t render them deeply enough unconscious.

Because of Ohio’s use of midazolam, federal Judge Michael Merz called the constitutionality of the state’s system into question in a Jan. 14 ruling and said inmates could suffer an experience similar to waterboarding.

However, Merz did not stop the execution. Instead, he said that under a test created by a previous U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Henness couldn’t demonstrate that a feasible execution alternative exists, and thus the execution could proceed.

Merz’s ruling is likely headed to a federal appeals court, which has previously upheld the use of midazolam in Ohio.

Three additional executions are scheduled before September. It’s likely attorneys in all those cases will ask for similar delays.

Henness’ lawyers, who had asked DeWine on Thursday for the delay, were pleased with the decision.

“We commend Governor DeWine for his leadership and for ensuring the justice system operates humanely in Ohio,” said David Stebbins, a federal public defender, in an emailed statement.

The announcement was DeWine’s first as governor regarding a death penalty case.

Myers was a lab technician at a veterans hospital in Chillicothe in southern Ohio and frequently volunteered with Alcoholics Anonymous.

Prosecutors said Henness kidnapped Myers, bound and then shot him at an abandoned water treatment plant, and then stole his credit cards, checks and car.

Henness, 55; his wife, Tabatha Henness; and friend Ronald Fair drove around in Myers’ car for several days afterward, forging the checks and using the credit cards, according to prosecutors.

Henness’ wife and their friend pleaded guilty to minor charges of forgery and then testified against Henness at trial.

Henness’ attorneys have argued he deserves mercy because of lingering questions about the others’ involvement in the killing.

Prosecutors say Henness has a history of lying and refusing to take responsibility for the killing.

Myers’ widow and son “are extremely disappointed that after almost 27 years from the vicious execution style murder of their loved one that there is further delay in carrying out the court’s lawful sentence,” Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O’Brien said in an emailed statement.

The Ohio Parole Board unanimously rejected Henness’ plea for mercy this month.

Man who spent days with girlfriend’s corpse convicted

CINCINNATI (AP) — A man who Cincinnati police say killed his girlfriend and then spent three days in a home with her corpse has been found guilty of murder.

Prosecutors say 54-year-old Thomas Walker was in a rage when he shot 41-year-old Necole Craig-Jones in the head at their Cincinnati home in May 2016. The Cincinnati Enquirer reports a Hamilton County jury reached its verdict Thursday, finding Walker guilty of charges that also included gross abuse of a corpse and tampering with evidence.

Walker’s attorneys argued the shooting was a tragic accident. Prosecutors countered that Walker planned behavior after the shooting in an attempt “to get himself out of trouble.”

Walker is scheduled to be sentenced Feb. 14.

Information from: The Cincinnati Enquirer, http://www.enquirer.com

Icy blast reminds of 2014 ‘polar vortex,’ with worst to come

By DAVE KOLPACK and BLAKE NICHOLSON

Associated Press

Friday, January 25

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — An arctic blast spread painful cold across the Midwest on Friday, closing schools, opening warming centers and even intimidating ice fishermen in a taste of the even more dangerous weather expected next week.

Forecasters called it a replay of the “polar vortex” that bludgeoned the U.S. in 2014 — and maybe even colder, with wind chills by midweek as much as 45 below in Chicago.

“We’re going to be feeling it big time,” Jeff Masters, meteorology director at the private Weather Underground, said. “It’s going to be the coldest air in five years.”

For much of middle America, the leading edge was bad enough. Cold weather advisories were in effect Friday from North Dakota to Ohio, with dangerously cold wind chills that could dip to as low as 45 below zero (negative 42 Celsius) in northern Wisconsin and Minnesota and to 35 below (negative 37 Celsius) in parts of northern Illinois and Iowa.

When the polar vortex plunges into the U.S., it will be warmer in parts of the Arctic — Greenland, northern Canada and Alaska — than in Chicago and Minneapolis, meteorologists said.

Schools in Milwaukee canceled classes Friday, when the expected high was just 2 (minus 16.7 Celsius). So did schools in western Michigan, eastern Iowa and northern Illinois. In northern Michigan, residents of islands in the river connecting Lake Superior and Lake Huron were warned to stock up on supplies in case ferry service was cut off. In Chicago, warming centers opened.

Kenny Blackwell and his son, Corey, moved from Virginia to North Dakota to help build low-income housing projects. Outside their current project on Friday, they chuckled at a cellphone showing the temperature at minus-10 and said it felt more like Alaska.

“The money here is great but the weather here is so nasty it made my dad’s hair freeze,” Corey Blackwell said. “We had to go out and buy some North Dakota clothes!”

Masters said the cold snap is due to the polar vortex, the gigantic circular upper air weather pattern in the Arctic region enveloping the North Pole, splitting into three pieces in late December because of an occasional weather condition called “sudden stratospheric warming.”

One chunk of that trapped cold air went to Siberia, another to Scandinavia, and the third piece is heading through Canada. On Wednesday, it will be over northern Michigan somewhere, he said.

It’s a system some forecasters have dubbed “Barney” because computer forecast models show the cold air as chubby purple blobs, said Ryan Maue, a meteorologist with the private forecasting company weather.us.

The polar vortex rarely plunges as far south as the U.S., maybe every few years or more, Maue said. The last big plunge was Jan. 6, 2014, when Chicago’s temperature dipped to minus-16.

Ice fishing guide Bryan Lang acknowledged that extreme cold was part of his job in northern North Dakota, but he said he felt lucky to have taken Friday off work: the morning temperature was negative 21 degrees (negative 29 Celsius) with a wind chill of minus 42 (negative 41 Celsius).

“I’m glad to be in the house drinking coffee,” he laughed.

The deep freeze caused organizers of the Winter Carnival in Minnesota to cancel several events, including Thursday night’s parade through downtown St. Paul.

The low temperatures also forced the cancellation of events in the Fargo Frostival, a celebration of winter activities in North Dakota’s largest city. Organizer Charley Johnson joked that the Undie Run will go on Saturday as scheduled, but that long underwear was encouraged.

“We’re going to persevere no matter what with most of these events,” Johnson said. “We know they’ll be smart about it. The people will bundle up and not stay outside too long.”

Nicholson reported from Bismarck, North Dakota. AP Science Writer Seth Borenstein in Washington and AP reporters David Runk in Detroit, Gretchen Ehlke in Milwaukee and Nelson Lampe in Omaha, Nebraska, contributed to this report. For the latest developments on this story: https://bit.ly/2Wk7CzO

Prosecutors: Man accused of illegal slaughterhouse charged

Sunday, January 27

CLEVELAND (AP) — An Ohio man accused of operating an illegal slaughterhouse has been charged with conspiracy to launder money and other counts, federal prosecutors said.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office says Amin Salem, 59, of Westlake, secretly owned several Cleveland-area gas stations and accepted food stamps at those stations, despite prior convictions for food stamp fraud. Federal authorities also accuse Salem of illegally slaughtering lambs and goats on his property in Elyria — polluting a stream with lamb and goat blood.

Salem sold the meat, which wasn’t inspected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and allowed people to pay for it with food stamps in violation of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program regulations, authorities said.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said in a release that Salem also is charged with engaging in real estate transactions using laundered funds, making unpermitted discharges into a waterway, distribution of adulterated, misbranded or uninspected meat and being a felon in possession of firearms.

Salem’s slaughtering of the animals caused the illegal discharge of blood and other bodily fluids to flow into Engle Ditch, which flows into the Black River and eventually Lake Erie, authorities said.

Salem has pleaded not guilty. His attorney, John Sammon, said in an email Sunday that they intend to prove at the trial in Youngstown that Salem is not guilty of the charges.

Money from the illegal meat sales and food stamp transactions was deposited into gas station accounts, which were then sent to accounts controlled by the Salem family, according to prosecutors.

Authorities said Salem’s son, Mohamed Salem, sold the meat illegally slaughtered at his father’s property and allowed people to pay for it using food stamps in violation of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program regulations. Mohamed Salem has pleaded not guilty to charges including money laundering conspiracy and trafficking in counterfeit goods.

Phone and email messages left Sunday for Mohamed Salem’s attorney, Steven Bradley, weren’t immediately returned.

NEW REINSTATEMENT FEE AMNESTY INITIATIVE

Effective January 31, 2019

COLUMBUS —House Bill 336, the Reinstatement Fee Amnesty Initiative, created a six-month program for driver license reinstatement fee reduction and waiver for offenders whose driver licenses have been suspended for specific violations. The initiative only applies to a driver license or permit suspension; it does not apply to a commercial driver license or commercial permit suspension.

The Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) will determine an applicant’s eligibility based on the defined permissible qualifying offenses contained in Ohio Revised Code.

In order to be eligible for reinstatement fee reduction:

Applicants must have completed all court-ordered sanctions related to the eligible offense other than the payment of reinstatement fees.

At least 18 months must have passed since the end of the period of the suspension ordered by the court. Those able to provide proof of indigence will qualify for a complete amnesty of reinstatement fees.

Effective January 31, 2019, to apply, complete BMV form 2829, a BMV Reinstatement Fee Amnesty Application. You may obtain the form at your local Deputy Registrar, online at www.bmv.ohio.gov or it can be mailed to you by calling 614-752-7500.

As stated in HB336, “indigent” means a person who is a participant in the supplemental nutrition assistance program administered by the department of job and family services pursuant to section 5101.54 of the Revised Code.

Columbus Region’s Irene Alvarez and Justin Bickle Win 40 Under 40 Awards in Economic Development

Fort Lauderdale, Florida – Irene Alvarez, vice president of brand marketing and communications at the Columbus Partnership, and Justin Bickle, director of project management at Columbus 2020, have been selected as winners in the economic development profession’s 40 Under 40 awards, the only award of its kind recognizing young talent in the economic development industry.

An independent five-member selection committee chose the winners based on their exceptional contributions to the economic development industry. The awards program was managed by Development Counsellors International (DCI), a New York-based firm that specializes in economic development marketing, and Jorgenson Consulting, a leading national executive search firm serving organizations in economic and community development industries.

“We are delighted to see Irene recognized for her innovative work in the economic development profession,” said Alex Fischer, president and CEO at the Columbus Partnership. “Irene’s continuous efforts to market the Columbus Region on local, national and global platforms have been instrumental to our community’s success.”

In her role, Irene leads initiatives across various sectors to meet Columbus Region marketing objectives and drives efforts to build the Columbus brand and global identity. Additionally, Irene aligns marketing activity among the Columbus Partnership and its teams at Columbus 2020 and Smart Columbus.

“Justin’s strong management skills and tireless efforts on behalf of the projects he oversees have made a sizeable impact on residents throughout the Columbus Region,” said Kenny McDonald, president and CEO at Columbus 2020. “This recognition highlights the role young, talented minds play in growing vibrant places.”

In his role, Justin leads Columbus 2020’s project management team activities and active pipeline of expansion projects, placing an emphasis on the strategic qualification of growth opportunities and best-in-class client service. Justin consults clients through the site location process to help them take advantage of the Columbus Region’s business resources.

The Econ Dev 40 Under 40 award is designed to discover the economic development profession’s rising stars.

“These young economic development professionals represent the future of our industry,” said Julie Curtin, president of DCI’s economic development practice. “The selection committee had a challenge of selecting only forty, but we are delighted by the smarts, initiative and game changing mindsets represented in these finalists. Economic development is in good hands with these young leaders, and Irene Alvarez and Justin Bickle are certainly no exception,” Curtin added.

DCI and Jorgenson officially announced the winners last night at an awards reception during the International Economic Development Council Leadership Summit in Fort Lauderdale and will feature profiles of each on the awards website.

“The awardees this year embodied passion for the profession and a commitment to excellence, innovation and place-making,” says Chris Camacho, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council and 40 Under 40 selection committee member. “The field of economic development is evolving and we’re seeing many people rise up to assure this profession is on the edge and inclusive. Congrats to the new class of 40 Under 40.”

For more information on the Econ Dev 40 Under 40 winners, visit econdev40under40.com.

About Columbus 2020

As the economic development organization for the Columbus Region, Columbus 2020’s mission is to generate opportunity and build capacity for economic growth across 11 Central Ohio counties. In 2010, hundreds of business and community leaders developed the Columbus 2020 Regional Growth Strategy, and the Columbus Region is now experiencing the strongest decade of growth in its history. The Columbus 2020 team conducts business outreach, promotes the Columbus

Region to market-leading companies around the world, conducts customized research to better understand the Columbus Region’s competitiveness, and works to leverage public, private and institutional partnerships. Funding is received from more than 300 private organizations, local governments, academic institutions and JobsOhio. Learn more at ColumbusRegion.com.

About DCI

Considered the leader in marketing places, Development Counsellors International (DCI) specializes in economic development and tourism marketing. The agency has worked for more than 500 cities, regions, states and countries since it was established in New York City in 1960. Learn more at aboutdci.com.

About Jorgenson Consulting

Jorgenson Consulting has worked diligently over the past 25 years to establish itself as a premier national executive search firm. With a focus on the fields of non-profit, economic and community development, they partner with clients to help them identify and secure the highest caliber of executive talent. Learn more at jci-inc.net.

The Columbus Symphony to Perform Its Fiery Spanish Flamenco Festival at the Newly Renovated Palace Theatre March 1 & 2

In a concert inspired by adventure and Spanish exoticism, the Columbus Symphony will perform the Spanish Flamenco Festival at the newly renovated Palace Theatre on March 1 and 2. The auditorium of the 1926 historic venue received a six-month, $2.5 million facelift, and was reopened to the public in November 2018. Guest conducted by John Axelrod, musical director of the Royal Seville Symphony Orchestra, the program will feature local flamenco star Griset Damas and the Flamenco Company of Columbus. The full program includes Turina’s Danzas fantasticas, Falla’s La Vida Breve: Danse Espagnole No. 1, and concludes with the enchanting, rhythmic vitality of Dvořák’s richly melodic New World Symphony (Symphony No. 9).

The Columbus Symphony presents the Spanish Flamenco Festival: From Seville to the New World at the Palace Theatre (34 W. Broad St.) on Friday and Saturday, March 1 and 2, at 8pm. Tickets start at $10 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.columbussymphony.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. The CAPA Ticket Center will also be open two hours prior to each performance.

Prelude – Patrons are invited to attend a 30-minute, pre-concert discussion with John Axelrod and Ohio Dominican University Professor of English Jeremy Glazier.

Postlude – Directly following the performance, patrons may enjoy a flamenco demonstration by featured dancer Griset Damas and a sangria tasting.

About guest conductor John Axelrod

With an extraordinarily diverse repertoire, innovative programming and charismatic performance style, John Axelrod is widely recognized as one of today’s leading conductors and is sought after by orchestras throughout the world. Axelrod became artistic and musical director of the Real Orquesta Sinfónica de Sevilla (ROSS) in 2014, and his contract has been unanimously extended through the 2019-20 season. In 2017, he was also appointed the general director of ROSS, a unique position in the orchestra’s history. Other positions include principal guest conductor of Orchestra Sinfonica di Milano “Giuseppe” Verdi (2001-17), music director of the l’Orchestre National des Pays de la Loire (2009-13), music director and chief conductor of the Lucerne Symphony Orchestra and Theater (2004-09), and music director of “Hollywood in Vienna” with the ORF Vienna Radio Orchestra (2009-11).

About featured dance artist Griset Damas

Born in Havana, Griset Damas began a ballet career at the age of eight with Escuela Alejo Carpentier and then in the Escuela Nacional de Arte before being selected by the Ballet Español de Cuba in a new career as a flamenco and classical Spanish dancer. In 2014, during a vacation to the US, Damas was invited by Columbus-based Flamenco del Corazon to teach a flamenco workshop. Damas decided to stay and began teaching regular flamenco and ballet classes. She was hired by Powell Dance Academy as a ballet and pointe teacher and invited to teach intensive flamenco courses by the Dublin Dance Center and Gymnastics and BalletMet.

About Flamenco Company of Columbus

Created by Griset Damas in 2015, Flamenco Company of Columbus is the only group performing flamenco music and dance in the state of Ohio. Composed of guitarist Karl Wohlwend, percussionist Michael Yonchak, vocalist Maria Dolores Ramirez, and dancer Griset Damas, the group is dedicated to the study and development of this world-renowned genre, which in 2010, was added to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). www.uwilldance.com

About composer Joaquín Turina Pérez (1882–1949)

Turina was a Spanish composer of classical music. Much of his work shows the influence of traditional Andalusian music, and often conveys a feeling of rapture or exaltation. His Danzas fantásticas (Fantasy Dances or Fantastic Dances) was inspired by the novel La orgía by José Mas, and quotations from the novel were printed on the score at the start of each dance. The work was originally written for piano solo in August 1919. Turina then orchestrated the work between September 15-December 30, 1919. The orchestral version was first heard on February 13, 1920, in the Teatro Price in Madrid with the Orquesta Filarmonica de Madrid. The composer himself first presented the piano solo version on June 15, 1920, at the Málaga Sociedad Filarmonica.

About composer Manuel de Falla y Matheu (1876–1946)

Composer Falla was one of Spain’s most important musicians of the first half of the 20th century. His image appeared on Spain’s 1970 100-pesetas banknote. His La vida breve (Spanish Life is Short or The Brief Life) is an opera in two acts and four scenes written between August 1904 and March 1905, but not produced until 1913. The first performance was given (in a French translation) at the Casino Municipal in Nice on April1, 1913. Paris and Madrid performances followed, later in 1913 and in 1914 respectively. Debussy influenced Falla to transform it from the number opera it was at its Nice premiere to an opera with a more continuous musical texture and more mature orchestration. This revision was first heard at the Paris premiere at the Opéra-Comique in December 1913, and is the standard version.

About composer Antonín Dvořák (1841–1904)

Czech composer Antonín Dvořák’s Romantic-era nationalist style frequently employed rhythms and other aspects of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia in his work. His Symphony No. 9, “From the New World” (popularly known as the New World Symphony), was composed in 1893 while he was the director of the National Conservatory of Music of America (1892-95). It is by far his most popular symphony, and one of the most popular of all symphonies. In 1969, astronaut Neil Armstrong took a recording of the New World Symphony on the Apollo 11 mission for the first moon landing.

www.columbussymphony.com

CALENDAR LISTING

The Columbus Symphony presents SPANISH FLAMENCO FESTIVAL: FROM SEVILLE TO THE NEW WORLD

Friday & Saturday, March 1 & 2, 8 pm

Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.)

In a concert inspired by adventure and Spanish exoticism, the Columbus Symphony will perform the Spanish Flamenco Festival at the newly renovated Palace Theatre. Guest conducted by John Axelrod, musical director of the Royal Seville Symphony Orchestra, the program will feature local flamenco star Griset Damas and the Flamenco Company of Columbus. The full program includes Turina’s Danzas fantasticas, Falla’s La Vida Breve: Danse Espagnole No. 1, and concludes with the enchanting, rhythmic vitality of Dvořák’s richly melodic New World Symphony (Symphony No. 9). Tickets start at $10 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.columbussymphony.com, or by phone at (614) 228-8600 or (800) 745-3000.

The 2018-19 season is made possible in part by state tax dollars allocated by the Ohio Legislature to the Ohio Arts Council (OAC). The OAC is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally, and economically. The CSO also appreciates the support of the Greater Columbus Arts Council, supporting the city’s artists and arts organizations since 1973, and the Kenneth L. Coe and Jack Barrow, and Mr. and Mrs. Derrol R. Johnson funds of The Columbus Foundation, assisting donors and others in strengthening our community for the benefit of all its citizens.

About the Columbus Symphony Orchestra

Founded in 1951, the Columbus Symphony is the only full-time, professional symphony in central Ohio. Through an array of innovative artistic, educational, and community outreach programming, the Columbus Symphony is reaching an expanding, more diverse audience each year. This season, the Columbus Symphony will share classical music with more than 200,000 people in central Ohio through concerts, radio broadcasts, and special programming. For more information, visit www.columbussymphony.com.

In this screenshot taken from a Southern Ohio Correction Facility security camera video four inmates, handcuffed to a table, are attacked by a fellow prisoner who slipped his handcuffs and brandished a knife, Sunday, June 4, 2017, at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, Ohio. (Southern Ohio Correction Facility via AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122205552-34a66593aa09480299765a504c8ee40f.jpgIn this screenshot taken from a Southern Ohio Correction Facility security camera video four inmates, handcuffed to a table, are attacked by a fellow prisoner who slipped his handcuffs and brandished a knife, Sunday, June 4, 2017, at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, Ohio. (Southern Ohio Correction Facility via AP)

In this Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 photo, fences line the exterior of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility, in Lucasville, Ohio. A newly released video of a 2017 attack between inmates at the facility obtained by The Associated Press reveals for the first time the extent of the victims’ injuries and raises questions about how the bloody attack happened inside one of Ohio’s most secure prisons. A fellow inmate slipped out of his cuffs and allegedly stabbed Shamieke Pugh and three other inmates multiple times as they sat handcuffed to a table and were unable to defend themselves. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122205552-fc13437db38541399f1dd3f41a1717fc.jpgIn this Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 photo, fences line the exterior of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility, in Lucasville, Ohio. A newly released video of a 2017 attack between inmates at the facility obtained by The Associated Press reveals for the first time the extent of the victims’ injuries and raises questions about how the bloody attack happened inside one of Ohio’s most secure prisons. A fellow inmate slipped out of his cuffs and allegedly stabbed Shamieke Pugh and three other inmates multiple times as they sat handcuffed to a table and were unable to defend themselves. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

In this Monday, Dec. 31, 2018 photo, Shamieke Pugh discusses injuries he suffered in 2017 when a fellow inmate at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville slipped out of his cuffs and allegedly stabbed Pugh and three other inmates multiple times as they sat handcuffed to a table and were unable to defend themselves, in Delaware, Ohio. A recently released video of the attack obtained by The Associated Press reveals for the first time the extent of the victims’ injuries and raises questions about how the bloody attack happened inside one of Ohio’s most secure prisons. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122205552-6a7f2e01494847fb98e17fe6d73db5df.jpgIn this Monday, Dec. 31, 2018 photo, Shamieke Pugh discusses injuries he suffered in 2017 when a fellow inmate at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville slipped out of his cuffs and allegedly stabbed Pugh and three other inmates multiple times as they sat handcuffed to a table and were unable to defend themselves, in Delaware, Ohio. A recently released video of the attack obtained by The Associated Press reveals for the first time the extent of the victims’ injuries and raises questions about how the bloody attack happened inside one of Ohio’s most secure prisons. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)
OHIO NEWS

STAFF & WIRE REPORTS