Wind ices Lake Erie


Staff & Wire Reports



Mounds of ice collect along the Lake Erie shore at Hoover Beach, in Hamburg, NY, Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. High winds howled through much of the nation's eastern half for a second day Monday, cutting power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, closing schools, and pushing dramatic mountains of ice onto the shores of Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)

Mounds of ice collect along the Lake Erie shore at Hoover Beach, in Hamburg, NY, Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. High winds howled through much of the nation's eastern half for a second day Monday, cutting power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, closing schools, and pushing dramatic mountains of ice onto the shores of Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)


Rose Hirschbeck, of Hamburg, NY, photographs mounds of ice collected along the Lake Erie shore at Hoover Beach, in Hamburg, N.Y., Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. High winds howled through much of the nation's eastern half for a second day Monday, cutting power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, closing schools, and pushing dramatic mountains of ice onto the shores of Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)


A family walks near a massive build up of ice that was pushed onto the shore of Mather Park in Fort Erie, Ont., Monday, February 25, 2019. A windstorm Sunday broke an ice boom in Lake Erie and allowed the ice, which was floating on the water at the mouth of the Niagara River, to shove over the retaining wall and onto the shore and the roadway above. (Tara Walton/The Canadian Press via AP)


High winds cut power, inundate Lake Erie shoreline with ice

By CAROLYN THOMPSON

Associated Press

Tuesday, February 26

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — High winds howled through much of the eastern U.S. for a second day Monday, cutting power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, closing schools, and pushing dramatic mounds of ice onto the shores of Lake Erie.

Wind gusts of hurricane force — 74 mph (119 kph) — or higher were reported around the region, including West Virginia and New York. While atop Mount Washington, the Northeast’s highest peak of 6,288 feet (1,916 meters) in New Hampshire, a gust of 144 mph (231 kph) was recorded.

Toppled trees and power poles, easy targets for strong winds that uprooted them from ground saturated by rain and snowmelt, plunged homes and businesses into darkness, though in most places power was expected back quickly as winds died down by the end of Monday. Hundreds of schools were delayed or canceled in New York alone.

The wind peeled off roofs in places. In Syracuse, New York, scaffolding blown off a building knocked down power lines.

Wind advisories and warnings were in effect through Monday in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast up to northern New England. In Maine, police say a trucker blamed wind for causing his tractor-trailer loaded with bananas to swerve and overturn on the Maine Turnpike. While in Sandusky, Ohio, a motorist captured video of a tractor-trailer flipping over on a bridge .

Giant chunks of ice spilled over the banks of the Niagara River across from Buffalo on Sunday, creating a jagged, frosty barrier between the river and a scenic road.

Dramatic footage captured by park police in Ontario showed the massive chunks roiling onto shore. High winds had raised water levels on the eastern end of Lake Erie in a phenomenon known as a seiche and then, according to the New York Power Authority, driven ice over a boom upstream from the river.

Ice mounds 25 to 30 feet (8 to 9 meters) high also came ashore farther south, piling up on several lakefront properties in suburban Hamburg.

“We’ve had storms in the past, but nothing like this,” resident Dave Schultz told WGRZ. “We’ve never had the ice pushed up against the walls and right up onto our patios. … It’s in my patio, the neighbor’s patio, and the patio after that.”

A voluntary evacuation for the area was issued Sunday.

Empty tractor-trailers and empty tandem trucks have been banned on some highways. Trucks were also banned on some bridges in New York City, where the winds sent litter swirling in the canyons between skyscrapers and rocked sidewalk food carts precariously.

STORM AND OUTAGE UPDATE: WINTER STORM QUIANA – 11:30 A.M.

Update: 11:30 AM, 2/27/2019

GAHANNA, Ohio, Feb. 27, 2019 – About 800 AEP Ohio customers remain without power in the hard hit areas of Steubenville, Canton and New Philadelphia after Sunday’s windstorm took down trees, power lines and almost 150 poles across the company’s service territory. At the height of the event, 76,000 customers lost power.

Status of Restoration Efforts

As restoration work was completed in other parts of the state, additional crews were moved into these areas yesterday. Outages that restore the greatest numbers of customers have been completed. Outages that restore fewer or single customers often take crews more time to complete. While difficult terrain and single outages have slowed the restoration process in the remaining areas, all customers are expected to be restored by end of day. Today’s restoration times by area are as follows:

Canton North – 3 p.m.

Canton South – 6 p.m.

New Philadelphia – 11 p.m.

Steubenville – 8 p.m.

Safety Messages

Never touch a downed utility wire, no matter how harmless it looks. It can be difficult to distinguish between a power line and a cable or telephone line. All downed lines should be considered energized and dangerous. And don’t touch anything in contact with the line, such as trees, fences or puddles of water, since they can conduct electricity. Keep children and pets away from this potential hazard. Call AEP Ohio to report any downed lines or equipment.

In the event of a major power interruption, life-support customers are encouraged to contact AEP Ohio’s toll-free customer service number to advise our representatives of their situation. Due to the nature of restoration activity, AEP Ohio cannot assure priority restoration for life-support customers. Life-support customers are advised to take precautionary measures to protect themselves in the event of a power loss. Contact relatives or friends for assistance or temporary accommodations in the event of a prolonged outage. Keep emergency phone numbers (physicians, hospitals, safety services, utilities) posted near your telephone.

Customer Information

Customers are reminded that during storm restoration situations, AEP Ohio tree crews clear rights of way of trees and move on to the next location. AEP Ohio does not return to remove the cut trees. Property owners are responsible for brush removal.

Residents without power are asked not to stop crew trucks as this will only slow down repairs. AEP Ohio asks for your patience and understanding during the restoration process. In many areas, crews must rebuild significant portions of electric facilities to restore power.

AEP Ohio cannot connect power to any home or business where there is damage to the service entrance. The service entrance is the area located 1) at the meter, 2) between the meter and the home’s electrical panel, or 3) the location where AEP Ohio’s cable connects to the home/business owner’s cable. Customers need to have a qualified electrician repair this damage before power can be restored to the home or business.

Next Update

This is the last update on this storm.

Customers can report outages and check the latest restoration information for their account via AEPOhio.com/Outages or by loading the AEP Ohio app. Restoration information is also posted on Facebook (Facebook.com/AEPOhio) and Twitter (Twitter.com/AEPOhio).

Prior Updates

2/26/2019, 2:00 PM ET

2/25/2019, 5:30 PM ET

2/25/2019, 11:30 AM ET

2/24/2019, 7:45 PM ET

Customer Calls

Customer Solutions Center

(800) 672-2231

About AEP Ohio

AEP Ohio is based in Gahanna, Ohio, and is a unit of American Electric Power. AEP Ohio provides electricity to nearly 1.5 million customers. News and information about AEP Ohio can be found at AEPOhio.com.

American Electric Power based in Columbus, Ohio, is focused on building a smarter energy infrastructure and delivering new technologies and custom energy solutions to our customers. AEP’s more than 17,000 employees operate and maintain the nation’s largest electricity transmission system and more than 219,000 miles of distribution lines to efficiently deliver safe, reliable power to nearly 5.4 million regulated customers in 11 states. AEP also is one of the nation’s largest electricity producers with approximately 32,000 megawatts of diverse generating capacity, including 4,300 megawatts of renewable energy. AEP’s family of companies includes utilities AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia and West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service Company of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas). AEP also owns AEP Energy, AEP Energy Partners, AEP OnSite Partners and AEP Renewables, which provide innovative competitive energy solutions nationwide.

Shipping container cabin adds to unconventional lodging options in Ohio’s Hocking Hills

Yurts, tipis, cozy cottages or sparkling new Sleep Inn offer diversity

LOGAN, Ohio – Not only does Ohio’s Hocking Hills region offer breathtaking scenery and unforgettable experiences, it also boasts a host of lodging options that are truly one-of-a-kind, with these wildly diverse offerings making it easy for an entire family, a couple or a group of friends to escape into the woods for some uninterrupted time together. Travelers can book lodging and find out about this unique area via ExploreHockingHills.com.

New this year, a beautiful, comfortable oasis was crafted from three 40-foot-long steel shipping containers. The Box Hop is a family getaway and rental cabin built by Seth and Emily Britt, a realization of a college dream that had stuck with Seth for years. The structure is set on 18 lush acres in the midst of the Hocking Hills. It features a full kitchen, two bathrooms, three bedrooms and sleeps eight. A gas fireplace, rooftop patio and six-person hot tub are among other amenities. This unusual 900-square-foot cabin rents through Airbnb with detailed information and images found at TheBoxHop.com.

As a complete juxtaposition to the area’s prolific woodland cottages, cabins and quirky lodging offerings, the brand new Sleep Inn offers relaxing accommodations with easy access to a variety of local attractions, including Columbus Washboard Company, the last washboard factory in the U.S. still making the boards, Stuart’s Opera House, Hocking Hills State Park, High Rock Adventures, Hocking Hills Canopy Tours and Rockbridge State Nature Preserve.

A number of truly unconventional places in the Hocking Hills allow visitors to rest their heads after an unforgettable day in the hills. Travelers can spend the night in a historic train caboose, an authentic 1920s general store, and a vintage salt and pepper shaker museum. The authentic Native American tipis of At Boulder’s Edge allow visitors to experience first-hand just how special a visit to southeast Ohio’s Hocking Hills as they learn about the region’s rich native American history. Ravenwood Castle’s Medieval Village, castle rooms and Fairytale Village Cottages offer beautiful surroundings, wooded paths and one-of-a-kind Medieval-themed accommodations. A traditional Scottish hamlet, complete with Old World-style crofts and cottages, is part of the charm of The Glenlaurel Scottish Inn, which transports guests back to Medieval Europe, yet retains today’s modern conveniences. Glenlaurel’s fine dining and authentic Scottish Links Golf help visitors truly immerse themselves in a historical Scottish experience.

At the Inn & Spa at Cedar Falls, three fully-loaded high-end Mongolian yurts, complete with luxury amenities such as tiled showers and skylights, offer yet another option for visitors seeking to sleep in the unusual. In addition, Salt Creek Retreats offers rustic cabins and a yurt on 60 secluded acres near miles of private trails, a fishing pond, scenic overlook and a river for swimming. Dog friendly and fully stocked with dishes, utensils, pillows, chairs, heater and a grill, the yurt sleeps up to six. Complete accommodation booking and visitor information is found at ExploreHockingHills.com.

Beyond the quirky, a number of Hocking Hills lodging operators have taken luxury to a wild, new level. Majestic Oaks Lodge is one of the dozens deluxe lodges in the Hocking Hills that are fully loaded with far more comforts than most homes. With space for a whopping 44 guests, this stunner boasts 9,000 square feet of indoor living space; 4,800 square feet of gorgeous outdoor decks with two eight-person hot tubs; a heated, indoor pool; eight full baths; a dazzling gourmet kitchen and 18 acres of woodlands and trails.

Located 40 miles southeast of Columbus, Ohio, Hocking Hills offers once-in-a-lifetime experiences that make every day feel like Saturday, with plenty of Admission: FREE activities, such as the new John Glenn Astronomy Park. The region boasts a wide variety of affordable lodging, from camping, cabins, cottages and yurts to treehouses, country inns and traditional hotels. In addition to hiking trails, parks and forests, the Hocking Hills is the Canopy Tour Capital of the Midwest, with 55 ziplines being offered via three distinct guide services. Unique gift and antique shops, canoeing, horseback riding, bird watching, fishing, spas and more add to the allure of the Hocking Hills as the perfect place to unplug. Complete traveler information is available at ExploreHockingHills.com or 1-800-Hocking (800-462-5464).

“The Dollop” Podcast Tour Stops at the Davidson March 30

In 2014, history buff and comedian Dave Anthony decided to begin a new podcast wherein he would write up an unknown story from American history and read it to a different comedian each week, garnering a spontaneous reaction he hoped would be hilarious. His first guest comedian was Gareth Reynolds. The pair clicked immediately, and fans agreed, flooding social media with their approval. “The Dollop” quickly shot up the charts, drawing fans of both comedy and history to Dave’s wild stories of history and Gareth’s quick improv skills. Now with millions of downloads, “The Dollop” has become a regular presence at the top of the podcast charts, as well as selling out shows in both the US and Australia.

CAPA presents “The Dollop” at the Davidson Theatre (77 S. High St.) on Saturday, March 30, at 8 pm. Tickets are $25.50-$54 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

About Dave Anthony

Stand-up comedian, actor, and writer Dave Anthony has performed stand-up comedy in every state in the US, except Alaska, which he barely considers to be a state. He has appeared at the

Montreal Comedy Festival, the Vancouver Comedy Festival, the Melbourne Comedy Festival and the Bridgetown Comedy Festival. He has performed on “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” “The Late, Late Show,” and Comedy Central. Anthony has a recurring role on IFC’s “Maron” and has made guest appearances on “The Office,” “Arrested Development,” and “Hello, Ladies.” He was also co-host of the critically acclaimed “Walking the Room” podcast, a regular on Australia’s TOFOP with Wil Anderson, and a founder of the Los Angeles Podcast Festival.

About Gareth Reynolds

Gareth starred in NBC’s “The Real Wedding Crashers” which was as creatively stimulating as it was successful. Through that show, he began producing and writing his own material, eventually making shows at Comedy Central, the Travel Channel, and MTV. In 2015, he began doing an American history podcast called “The Dollop” which currently gets more than 5 million downloads every month and takes him all over the world to do live episodes. Between his podcast and touring the country doing stand-up, he has taken the lead on the ABC show “Hail Mary,” has been seen on IFC’s “Maron,” has written for Netflix original series “Flaked” and is currently writing on “Arrested Development.”

www.DollopPodcast.com

CALENDAR LISTING

CAPA presents THE DOLLOP

Saturday, March 30, 8 pm

Davidson Theatre (77 S. High St.)

In 2014, history buff and comedian Dave Anthony decided to begin a new podcast wherein he would write up an unknown story from American history and read it to a different comedian each week, garnering a spontaneous reaction he hoped would be hilarious. His first guest comedian was Gareth Reynolds. The pair clicked immediately, and fans agreed, flooding social media with their approval. “The Dollop” quickly shot up the charts, drawing fans of both comedy and history to Dave’s wild stories of history and Gareth’s quick improv skills. Now with millions of downloads, “The Dollop” has become a regular presence at the top of the podcast charts, as well as selling out shows in both the US and Australia. Tickets are $25.50-$54 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.capa.com

The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, education excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. CAPA also appreciates the generous support of the Barbara B. Coons and Robert Bartels Funds of The Columbus Foundation and the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

About CAPA

Owner/operator of downtown Columbus’ magnificent historic theatres (Ohio Theatre, Palace Theatre, Southern Theatre) and manager of the Riffe Center Theatre Complex, Lincoln Theatre, Drexel Theatre, Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts (New Albany, OH), and the Shubert Theater (New Haven, CT), CAPA is a non-profit, award-winning presenter of national and international performing arts and entertainment. For more information, visit www.capa.com.

Camp Kesem at The Ohio State University Announces Plans for Spring Benefit

Ohio State

Camp Kesem at The Ohio State University, a chapter part of a nationwide community driven by passionate college student leaders that supports children through and beyond their parent’s cancer, is pleased to announce plans for its spring fundraiser, Make the Magic. Make the Magic, which will be held on March 23, 2019, from 5:00-8:00 pm at Columbus Marriott Northwest in Dublin, Ohio. Tickets for the event are $65 and are available at https://donate.kesem.org/event/camp-kesem-at-the-ohio-state-university-make-the-magic-fy-2019/e213922 .

At this year’s Make the Magic, guests will enjoy a cocktail hour, hors-d’oeuvres, dinner, and an auction-style event, while you connect with our cause through engaging activities and conversations with our incredible student leaders, alumni, and even some campers! Funds raised during this annual fundraising night of dinner, philanthropy, and entertainment will help provide year-long peer support and send 190 kids to camp. Each ticket also includes a drink ticket, dinner, and a dessert.

In the summer of 2017, over 7,200 children attended free summer camps during over 100 week-long sessions of Camp Kesem held at fun and exciting sites from coast-to-coast. Camp Kesem is organized locally in Columbus, Ohio by dedicated students from The Ohio State University. In summer 2019, Camp Kesem at The Ohio State University will host 190 campers from June 30-July 5 and July 6-12 at Camp Kern in Oregonia, Ohio.

Over 5 million children have been impacted by a parent’s cancer and Camp Kesem is the largest national organization dedicated to this unique population. This camp experience and Kesem’s year-round support has a lasting impact on children by providing them a peer-support network that understands their unique needs, builds confidence, and strengthens their communication skills.

Children attending Camp Kesem at The Ohio State University will participate in a host of fun activities including camp fires, the Empowerment Ceremony, Messy Games, and the fashion show! Nightly “Cabin Chats” allow campers to open up to their peers and counselors.

Camp Kesem at The Ohio State University is organized by dedicated students at The Ohio State University who work year long to plan and fundraise for an impactful week of camp. Student volunteers and counselors experience leadership development and undergo extensive training prior to camp. Camp Kesem is provided free of charge to all participating families and is therefore supported by private donations and community support.

ABOUT CAMP KESEM

Camp Kesem is a nationwide community, driven by passionate college student leaders, that supports children through and beyond their parent’s cancer. Camp Kesem operates over 100 free summer camps in 40 states for children ages 6 to 18 who have been impacted by a parent’s cancer. This camping experience and Kesem’s year-long programs have a lasting impact on children by providing them a peer-support network that understands their unique needs, builds confidence and strengthens their communication skills. In 2017, Camp Kesem served over 7,200 children coast-to-coast, all funded by generous donations from individuals and corporate support. For more information on Camp Kesem, please visit www.kesem.org, Facebook.com/CampKesem, and @CampKesem on Twitter & Instagram.

ABOUT CAMP KESEM AT THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Camp Kesem at The Ohio State University was founded in 2011 and supports children in the Columbus community by providing two, one-week long summer camp experience and year-long peer support. Camp Kesem at The Ohio State University is operated by 120 student volunteers and serves approximately 168 campers ages 6 to 18 per year. For more information about Camp Kesem at The Ohio State University, please visit www.campkesem.org/ohio-state or Facebook.com/CampKesematOSU.

Mounds of ice collect along the Lake Erie shore at Hoover Beach, in Hamburg, NY, Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. High winds howled through much of the nation’s eastern half for a second day Monday, cutting power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, closing schools, and pushing dramatic mountains of ice onto the shores of Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122404029-bc7963a3da764701b352bc6ec6b42079.jpgMounds of ice collect along the Lake Erie shore at Hoover Beach, in Hamburg, NY, Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. High winds howled through much of the nation’s eastern half for a second day Monday, cutting power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, closing schools, and pushing dramatic mountains of ice onto the shores of Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)

Rose Hirschbeck, of Hamburg, NY, photographs mounds of ice collected along the Lake Erie shore at Hoover Beach, in Hamburg, N.Y., Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. High winds howled through much of the nation’s eastern half for a second day Monday, cutting power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, closing schools, and pushing dramatic mountains of ice onto the shores of Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122404029-0bdc8bb7247a4b4ba1257fa57a3726bf.jpgRose Hirschbeck, of Hamburg, NY, photographs mounds of ice collected along the Lake Erie shore at Hoover Beach, in Hamburg, N.Y., Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. High winds howled through much of the nation’s eastern half for a second day Monday, cutting power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, closing schools, and pushing dramatic mountains of ice onto the shores of Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)

A family walks near a massive build up of ice that was pushed onto the shore of Mather Park in Fort Erie, Ont., Monday, February 25, 2019. A windstorm Sunday broke an ice boom in Lake Erie and allowed the ice, which was floating on the water at the mouth of the Niagara River, to shove over the retaining wall and onto the shore and the roadway above. (Tara Walton/The Canadian Press via AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122404029-d43e584b002d4cb0bcdf0a5e9464399b.jpgA family walks near a massive build up of ice that was pushed onto the shore of Mather Park in Fort Erie, Ont., Monday, February 25, 2019. A windstorm Sunday broke an ice boom in Lake Erie and allowed the ice, which was floating on the water at the mouth of the Niagara River, to shove over the retaining wall and onto the shore and the roadway above. (Tara Walton/The Canadian Press via AP)

Staff & Wire Reports