Fish from Cuyahoga now safe


OHIO NEWS

Staff & Wire Reports



FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland.  Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat.
The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga  River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)

FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)


FILE – In this July 12, 2011, file photo, two rowers paddle along the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)


Fish in river that famously caught fire now OK’d for dinner

By JULIE CARR SMYTH

Associated Press

Tuesday, March 19

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in the Cuyahoga River, which became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say.

The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as an important step toward ultimately delisting the river altogether as an area of concern. Seven impairments remain to be addressed before that can happen.

“This is an example of the progress that can be achieved when you collaborate and dedicate resources to improving the quality of water in our state,” DeWine said in a statement. “We need to continue to invest in our water resources so that we can see additional improvements.”

The announcement came as DeWine is pushing a state budget that includes nearly $1 billion for water quality projects aimed at cleaning up toxic algae in Lake Erie and protecting other lakes and rivers in the state.

The Cuyahoga River was already one of the most polluted rivers in the country at the time of the fire on June 22, 1969, close to where the river empties into Lake Erie, according to the Ohio History Connection. The fire was neither the first nor the worst the river had experienced.

But the 1969 fire on the river, where industrial waste and sewage were regularly dumped, drew national media attention that made it an instant poster child for water pollution at a time when the country was becoming more environmentally aware.

“As we approach the 50th anniversary of the most infamous Cuyahoga River fire, we reflect on the progress that has been made,” said Kyle Dreyfuss-Wells, CEO of the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, whose creation was inspired by the Cuyahoga River fire, gave the thumbs-up to easing the fish consumption restrictions.

Regional administrator Cathy Stepp called it “a huge step” in the agency’s work to improve water quality.

The U.S. EPA agreed with Ohio EPA’s recommendation that restrictions on fish consumption be eased from Gorge Dam near Akron to Lake Erie in Cleveland. State regulators proposed the change last year judging by improvements observed through fish tissue sampling.

Ohio EPA Director Laurie Stevenson said in a statement, “If you safely can eat the fish, we know that’s a great indication that water quality is improving.”

WWI VETERANS IN COLUMBUS

Historian Julie Mujic, Ph.D., to Discuss Their Postwar Lives April 8 at Ohio Wesleyan

DELAWARE, Ohio – Historian Julie Mujic will present “‘A Vast Change Had Come Over the Streets’: The Postwar Lives of World War I Veterans in Columbus, Ohio” at 7:30 p.m. April 8 at Ohio Wesleyan University.

Mujic, Ph.D., of Paramount Historical Consulting, will speak in Benes Room B of Ohio Wesleyan’s Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave., Delaware. Admission is free.

More than a century after the end of the Great War, Mujic will discuss how WWI veterans and residents in Columbus responded to victory and how the men adjusted to lives as veterans in a community quite changed by the international conflict. She also will explore what has been done to honor and memorialize their sacrifice in the past century.

Mujic researches and writes about 19th and 20th century American history “in order to investigate mysteries about the past and uncover patterns and trends in history.”

In addition to operating Columbus-based Paramount Historical Consulting, Mujic also is a visiting assistant professor in the Global Commerce Department at Denison University.

She also serves on the Board of Trustees for the Columbus Historical Society, where she has helped to coordinate a World War I program, “We Shall Remember Them,” that runs through April 30. The theme of the exhibit and its related programming is the construction of memory in Columbus regarding World War I in the 100 years since it ended.

Mujic’s presentation represents Ohio Wesleyan’s 35th annual Joseph and Edith Vogel Lecture sponsored by the Department of History.

The Vogel Lecture is made possible by a generous gift from their son, Ezra F. Vogel, Ph.D., a 1950 Ohio Wesleyan graduate, native of Delaware, and retired professor of East Asian Studies at Harvard University. Ezra Vogel also is the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China.”

Learn more about Mujic at https://juliemujic.com and more about the Vogel Lecture Series and the OWU Department of History at www.owu.edu/history.

Founded in 1842, Ohio Wesleyan University is one of the nation’s premier liberal arts universities. Located in Delaware, Ohio, the private university offers more than 90 undergraduate majors and competes in 25 NCAA Division III varsity sports. Through Ohio Wesleyan’s signature OWU Connection program, students integrate knowledge across disciplines, build a diverse and global perspective, and apply their knowledge in real-world settings. Ohio Wesleyan is featured in the book “Colleges That Change Lives” and included in the U.S. News & World Report and Princeton Review “best colleges” lists. Learn more at www.owu.edu.

Upcoming Weekend Closure on West Side

Ohio Department of Transportation

Thu 3/21/2019 8:18 AM

Work to repair Wilson Rd. bridge over I-70

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TRAFFIC ADVISORY

Work to replace the damaged beams on the Wilson Rd. bridge over I-70 began earlier this week and will continue this weekend and next, weather permitting.

Two beams were damaged in September when a truck with its boom raised struck the bridge. Since then, the right lane of SB Wilson Rd. has been closed to keep drivers safe since the damaged beams cannot support the full load of traffic.

The majority of the repairs will be completed in two weekends with restrictions beginning at 7 PM Friday and lasting until Monday morning. Here’s how traffic will be impacted starting tomorrow night.

FRIDAY, MARCH 22 – MONDAY, MARCH 25

Wilson Rd. over I-70

11 PM FRIDAY: SB Wilson Rd. will close for the weekend.

Traffic can turn left onto I-70 WB, but won’t be able to continue further.

Detour: Wilson Rd. to Trabue Rd. to Hague Ave. to Fisher Rd. to Wilson Rd.

5 AM MONDAY: All lanes open, except the right lane of SB Wilson Rd.

I-70 between I-270 and Wilson Rd.

7 PM FRIDAY: I-70 EB will be reduced to three lanes

11 PM FRIDAY: I-70 EB will be reduced to two lanes and the ramp from I-270 SB to I-70 EB will be reduced to one lane.

11 PM FRIDAY: The ramp from I-70 EB to Wilson Rd. will close.

Detour: I-70 EB to I-670 EB to Grandview Ave. to I-670 WB to Wilson Rd.

12 MIDNIGHT FRIDAY: The ramp from I-270 NB to I-70 EB will close.

Detour: I-270 NB to I-70 WB to Hilliard-Rome Rd. SB to I-70 EB.

5 AM MONDAY: All lanes and ramps open.

All work is weather dependent; it may be postponed or cancelled without prior notice.

Zakir Hussain and Masters of Percussion Return to the Southern April 17

Appreciated both in the field of percussion and in the music world at large as an international phenomenon and one of the greatest musicians of our time, Zakir Hussain is a classical tabla virtuoso of the highest order. In Masters of Percussion, the Grammy-winning Hussain leads a mesmerizing ensemble of masters in Indian classical music including the astonishing Niladri Kumar on sitar, the peerless Eric Harland on Western drums, and the Kerala Drummers from the southwestern coast of India.

CAPA presents Zakir Hussain and Masters of Percussion at the Southern Theatre (21 E. Main St.) on Wednesday, April 17, at 8 pm. Tickets are $28.50-$48.50 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

About Zakir Hussain

Hussain is the pre-eminent classical tabla virtuoso of our time and is appreciated both in the field of percussion and in the music world at large as an international phenomenon. A national treasure in his native India, he is one of the world’s most esteemed and influential musicians, renowned for his genre-defying collaborations, including Shakti, the Diga Rhythm Band, Planet Drum, Tabla Beat Science, Celtic Connection, Sangam with Charles Lloyd and Eric Harland, in trio with Béla Fleck and Edgar Meyer and, most recently, with Herbie Hancock.

The foremost disciple of his father, the legendary Ustad Allarakha, Hussain was a child prodigy who began his professional career at 12, accompanying India’s greatest classical musicians and dancers, and touring internationally with great success by the age of 18.

As a composer, he has scored music for numerous feature films and major events and has composed three concertos. The most recent enjoys the distinction of being the first-ever concerto for tabla and orchestra and was premiered in India in September 2015, in Europe and the UK in 2016, and in the United States in April 2017, by the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center.

A multiple Grammy Award winner, Hussain is the recipient of countless awards and honors, including Padma Bhushan, National Heritage Fellowship and Officier in France’s Order of Arts and Letters. In 2015, he was voted “Best Percussionist” by both the DownBeat Critics’ Poll and Modern Drummer’s Reader’s Poll. He has taught at Princeton, Stanford, and the University of California at Berkeley, and is the founder and president of Moment! Records, an independent record label presenting rare live concert recordings of Indian classical music and world music. Hussain was resident artistic director at SF Jazz (2013-16) and was presented with their Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017 in recognition of his “unparalleled contribution to the world of music.”

About Masters of Percussion

Masters of Percussion grew from Hussain’s duet tours with his late father, the legendary Ustad Allarakha, and began biennial appearances in1996 to provide a platform for rarely heard rhythm traditions from India. Over time, the ensemble expanded to include great drummers and percussionists from many world traditions, including jazz, as well as the occasional stringed instrument. 2019 will be the centennial year of Allarakha’s birth, so this will be a very special MOP tour.

About Niladri Kumar

Blessed with a lineage of five generations of sitar players, Kumar is a world renowned and global icon to reckon with. Under the guidance and numerous years of training from his father and guru Pandit Kartick Kumar, Kumar went on to revolutionize sitar playing and further invent his own Instrument, the red electric sitar, which he coined as the Zitar. He is hailed as one of the serious exponents of Indian music and has an uncanny, prodigious style in making this music appealing to the youth and the masses at large. Critics state that he has an unmatchable, effortless mastery over the instrument, and it is indeed a unique treat to witness his swift, agile, and magical fingers produce soul-stirring, brilliant compositions. He has inspired many to learn the sitar, and through his illustrious career, has emerged as a one-of-a-kind cause for national pride. He has released more than 10 albums and been bestowed and recognized with several prestigious awards and valued titles. In addition, Kumar has contributed immensely to the Indian film industry. His live performances are known to transpose audiences to another world.

About Eric Harland

Harland is the most “in-demand” drummer of his generation primarily, but not exclusively, in the world of jazz. He has worked on more than 400 recordings and film scores and shared the stage with masters on the order of Betty Carter, Joe Henderson, McCoy Tyner, Michael Brecker, Terence Blanchard, Branford and Wynton Marsalis, Wayne Shorter, Savion Glover, and the SF Jazz Collective. He’s also played with virtually all the current rising stars, including Esperanza Spalding, Jane Monheit, Taylor Eigsti, Julian Lage, Stacie Orrico, and Robert Glasper. Harland currently works in multiple groups, including James Farm with Joshua Redman, Prism with Dave Holland and Kevin Eubanks, Sangam with Charles Lloyd and Zakir Hussain, Overtone with Dave Holland, Jason Moran, and Chris Potter, and his own Voyager. Outside jazz, he’s also collaborated with Les Claypool’s Primus, John Mayer, Mariah Carey, Steve Miller, and Spike Lee. Harland was resident artistic director at the SF Jazz Center for the 2014-16 seasons and the artist in residence at the 2014 Monterey Jazz Festival. After his extensive travels, he has come to realize that “The deepest secret is that life is not a process of discovery, but a process of creation.” That depth of understanding makes him a perfect member of Masters of Percussion.

About Mattannur Sankarankutty Marar and Group: The Drummers of Kerala

In the Indian tradition, Marar’s first teacher was his father, and from an early age he began his studies of Thayambaka, a call-and-response style of drumming using the South Indian chenda, a cylindrical instrument. This art is often associated with the story-play style of Kathakali, a classical South Indian dance form. Eventually, Marar was assigned the role of “Mela Pramani,” and performed it in Temple Festivals across southern India. In duet form, he has played with such greats as Ustad Allarakha and Padmashree Umayalpuaram Sivaraman. He was awarded the Padmasree by the President of India in 2009.

The group includes Marar’s sons, V. M. Sreekanth and V. M. Sreeraj, and their fellow Keralan Vellinezhi Anand. All three have progressed through lifelong training in Thayambaka and temple rituals, and have played with outstanding Indian artists including the legendary vocalist Hariharan, both in India and all over the world, from Europe to Hong Kong and most stops in between.

Prenatal allergies prompt sexual changes in offspring

Female rats born to exposed moms act like males, study finds

COLUMBUS, Ohio – A single allergic reaction during pregnancy prompts sexual-development changes in the brains of offspring that last a lifetime, new research suggests.

Female rats born to mothers exposed to an allergen during pregnancy acted more characteristically “male” – mounting other female rodents, for instance – and had brains and nervous systems that looked more like those seen in typical male animals.

The male offspring also showed a tendency toward more female characteristics and behaviors, though the changes were not as significant.

“The study shows for the first time that an allergic reaction in a mother could alter the sexual development of its offspring,” said Kathryn Lenz, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor of psychology at The Ohio State University. The research appears online in the journal Scientific Reports.

“This allergic response is enough to make the female brain look like a male’s brain, and that’s something that endures throughout its entire life.”

Previous research has shown that insults to the immune system, including stress, infection and malnutrition, can change brain development. This new research highlights the important role allergies could play, Lenz said.

She compared the allergic reaction in the study to an asthma attack – something that prompts a more-robust immune response than low-grade seasonal allergies but less severe than an allergic attack that would require a person to use an EpiPen or go to the emergency department.

Sexual development occurs on a spectrum and, in and of themselves, these shifts in sexual behavior after allergy exposure are not particularly troubling, Lenz said. They do help researchers understand the interplay between allergens and brain development, however, and highlight that early life immune activation could be a source of normal variations in female behavior, which haven’t been as well-studied.

And these types of brain changes as a response to an allergen could mean changes in other areas of concern, such as cognitive development.

“It’s possible these changes could also contribute to things like impaired decision-making, attention and hyperactivity,” she said.

The study builds on Lenz’s previous work, which found changes in immune cells called microglia and mast cells in an area of the brain called the preoptic area, a region of the hypothalamus involved in sexual behavior.

“We wanted to see if an allergic exposure that activated these cells would also change typical development,” said Lenz.

Mother animals in the study were either exposed once to an allergen derived from eggs or unexposed.

Then, the research team studied their pups into adulthood. Females born to mothers that had an allergic reaction during pregnancy exhibited higher levels of behavior normally attributed to males. They mounted other females more often and were as quick to mount another female as typical male rats. They also were drawn to bedding that smelled like other females.

Furthermore, they had increases in brain cells called mast cells and microglia and evidence of more synapses in the brain – changes that looked more like what the researchers would expect in a male rat.

Males born to the allergy-exposed mothers behaved less like typical male rats. They had less interest in mounting and less interest in female bedding. The researchers also saw less activation of microglia and fewer synapses – both of which point to a change in the rats as a result of the allergen exposure that made them more like females, Lenz said.

“Most of the scientific literature on immune activation during pregnancy and outcomes in offspring has focused on autism and schizophrenia. This is the first time we’re seeing this kind of connection with altered sexual development,” Lenz said.

“Interestingly, there’s some research out there to show an increase in gender variance and gender-identity differences in people with autism. It suggests that something about sexual development is different in people with autism.”

Lenz said she was especially interested in the profound changes seen in female brain development, because that’s an area that hasn’t been as well-studied in neuroscience.

“Oftentimes, we are focused on male animals because they appear to be more sensitive to environment changes and also have a higher incidence of conditions such as ADHD and autism. We often frame what we understand about the female brain and female behavior in relation to males. We need to move past that,” Lenz said.

“Study of female sexual development has just really been neglected. Even though we know there’s wide variety in girls’ and women’s behavior, we don’t really understand what contributes to those variations.”

Though it’s too soon to draw connections between what has been seen in the rats and human development, it may be worthwhile to explore further how medications and other factors during pregnancy may contribute to developmental changes in the fetus, Lenz said.

Other researchers who worked on the study were Anabel Galan of Ohio State and Margaret McCarthy, Lindsay Pickett and Christopher Wright of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

URL : http://news.osu.edu/prenatal-allergies-prompt-sexual-changes-in-offspring/

Deer Creek Shooting Range Closed for Two Weeks Beginning March 25

COLUMBUS, OH – The Class A shooting range at Deer Creek Wildlife Area will be closed from Monday, March 25 to Wednesday, April 10, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife.

The range will be closed for scheduled maintenance on the shooting lanes. The work was originally scheduled for January but was delayed because of winter conditions.

For questions, call Division of Wildlife District One office at (614) 644-3925.

Deer Creek Wildlife Area hosts thousands of shooters annually at its Class A shooting range. Class A, B, and C ranges require a shooting range permit for all persons 18 years and older. Range permits are available at all hunting and fishing license outlets and online at wildohio.gov. Permits are not sold at the ranges and must be purchased before arriving. Visitors can purchase one of two permits to use the ranges; a $24 annual shooting range permit allows the permit holder to access any of the five Division of Wildlife owned Class A, B, and C ranges throughout the year, or a $5 one-day shooting range permit. For more information about shooting ranges in Ohio, visit wildohio.gov.

The mission of the Division of Wildlife is to conserve and improve fish and wildlife resources and their habitats for sustainable use and appreciation by all. Visit wildohio.gov to find out more.

FILE – In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat.
The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/03/web1_122533480-33d6a74b916045aab5b72ab9a8bf2ae9.jpgFILE – In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat.
The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)

FILE – In this July 12, 2011, file photo, two rowers paddle along the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/03/web1_122533480-923a52f0231e45bebde12ea8882c4dbc.jpgFILE – In this July 12, 2011, file photo, two rowers paddle along the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
OHIO NEWS

Staff & Wire Reports