Gas-tax goes to Ohio house


Staff & Wire Reports



Senate Transportation Committee Chairman Rob McColley, a Republican from Napoleon, explains the state Senate’s decision to lower Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18-cent per gallon tax increase to 6 cents per gallon, on Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Columbus, Ohio. McColley says the Senate’s 6 cents proposal, approved Thursday, would take care of existing roads and bridges in the state. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)

Senate Transportation Committee Chairman Rob McColley, a Republican from Napoleon, explains the state Senate’s decision to lower Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18-cent per gallon tax increase to 6 cents per gallon, on Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Columbus, Ohio. McColley says the Senate’s 6 cents proposal, approved Thursday, would take care of existing roads and bridges in the state. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)


Ohio Senate proposes 6-cent increase to state gas tax

Thursday, March 21

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Senate on Thursday voted in favor of a proposal to increase the state’s gas tax by 6 cents a gallon, down from the House’s planned increase of 10.7 cents a gallon and well below the governor’s proposed 18-cents a gallon to maintain roads and bridges.

The Senate’s transportation committee unveiled its tax plan Thursday for an increase of 6 cents a gallon for gas and for diesel fuel in a substitute version of Ohio’s transportation budget that passed the committee 6-5. The full Senate voted 24-to-6 later in the day to approve the bill. It now heads back to the House for almost certain rejection, which would call for a House-Senate conference committee to convene for an attempt at a compromise.

Republican Gov. Mike DeWine proposes raising Ohio’s current tax of 28 cents per gallon on gas by 18 cents beginning July 1, and adjusting it annually for inflation. The tax on diesel fuel under his plan also would go up by 18 cents.

The House proposes an increase of 10.7 cents a gallon over three years beginning Oct. 1. The House proposal would increase the current 28-cents-per-gallon diesel-fuel tax by 20 cents a gallon, with that increase also phased in over a three-year period.

The House plan, which would not index the increase to inflation, would raise about $872 million per year, compared with about $1.2 billion from DeWine’s plan. The Senate proposal, which also does not set the tax to automatically rise with inflation, would raise about $400 million per year.

DeWine, who has already said that the increase proposed by the House wasn’t enough, said again Wednesday that his proposal was the “bare minimum” to keep up with needed repairs of poorly rated bridges, dangerous intersections and some new construction. A message seeking comment on Thursday’s vote was left with a spokesman for DeWine.

House GOP members had indicated their plan would lessen the impact of a tax increase on consumers while still meeting road-maintenance needs. Republican Rep. Scott Oelslager, chairman of the House Finance Committee, has described the House plan as a “more equitable” distribution of the tax burden.

Senate Transportation Chairman Rob McColley voted against the Senate version Thursday because it doesn’t contain a corresponding tax cut to off-set the 6-cent increase. McColley said, however, that he was comfortable after an “extensive analysis” that the 6-cent proposal is enough to fund existing road maintenance with some extra construction on top.

“Our policy, number one, should be taking care of existing roads and bridges, and this budget definitely does that,” said McColley, a Republican from Napoleon in northwestern Ohio.

The Senate committee’s proposed transportation budget also would reinstate the requirement for Ohioans to have both front and back license plates on their vehicles. The House has proposed eliminating the front license.

Reminder: Weekend Closure on West Side

Ohio Department of Transportation

Fri 3/22/2019 9:01 AM

Work to repair Wilson Rd. bridge over I-70

TRAFFIC ADVISORY

Work to replace the damaged beams on the Wilson Rd. bridge over I-70 began earlier this week and will continue this weekend and next, weather permitting.

Two beams were damaged in September when a truck with its boom raised struck the bridge. Since then, the right lane of SB Wilson Rd. has been closed to keep drivers safe since the damaged beams cannot support the full load of traffic.

The majority of the repairs will be completed in two weekends with restrictions beginning at 7 PM Friday and lasting until Monday morning. Here’s how traffic will be impacted starting tonight (times updated since yesterday’s release).

FRIDAY, MARCH 22 – MONDAY, MARCH 25

Wilson Rd. over I-70

10 PM FRIDAY: SB Wilson Rd. will close for the weekend.

Traffic can turn left onto I-70 WB, but won’t be able to continue further.

Detour: Wilson Rd. to Trabue Rd. to Hague Ave. to Fisher Rd. to Wilson Rd.

5 AM MONDAY: All lanes open, except the right lane of SB Wilson Rd.

I-70 between I-270 and Wilson Rd.

7 PM FRIDAY: I-70 EB will be reduced to three lanes

10 PM FRIDAY: I-70 EB will be reduced to two lanes and the ramp from I-270 SB to I-70 EB will be reduced to one lane.

10 PM FRIDAY: The following ramps will close:

I-70 EB to Wilson Rd.

Detour: I-70 EB to I-670 EB to Grandview Ave. to I-670 WB to Wilson Rd.

I-270 NB to I-70 EB

Detour: I-270 NB to I-70 WB to Hilliard-Rome Rd. SB to I-70 EB.

5 AM MONDAY: All lanes and ramps open.

Overnight Closures of I-270 at I-670

I-270 will close in both directions Friday and Saturday night from midnight to 6 AM so crews can remove the deck of the closed portion of the I-670 EB bridge over I-270.

Here’s the full list of impacts:

FRIDAY, MARCH 22

I-270 Southbound

8 PM: I-270 SB will be reduced to two lanes between Morse Rd. and Easton Way and reduced to three lanes between Easton Way and I-670

8 PM: The ramp from US 62 WB to I-270 SB will close.

Detour: US 62 WB to I-670 WB to 5th Ave. to I-670 EB to I-270 SB

10 PM: I-270 SB will be reduced to two lanes between I-670 and Johnstown Rd.

11 PM: I-270 SB will be reduced to one lane between I-670 and Johnstown Rd.

12 MIDNIGHT: I-270 SB will close between I-670 and Johnstown Rd.

Detour: I-270 SB to I-670 WB to I-71 SB to I-70 EB to I-270

12 MIDNIGHT: The ramp from I-270 SB to US 62 EB will close.

Detour: I-270 SB to I-670 WB to 5th Ave. to I-670 EB to US 62 EB

6 AM: All lanes and ramps open

I-270 Northbound

9 PM: I-270 NB will be reduced to three lanes between Hamilton Rd. and Johnstown Rd. and reduced to two lanes between Hamilton Rd. and I-670.

11 PM: I-270 NB will be reduced to one lane between Johnstown Rd. and I-670

12 MIDNIGHT: I-270 NB will close between Johnstown Rd. and I-670

Detour: I-270 NB to I-670 WB to I-71 NB to I-270

6 AM: All lanes open

SATURDAY, MARCH 23

I-270 Southbound

7 PM: I-270 SB will be reduced to two lanes between Morse Rd. and Easton Way and reduced to three lanes between Easton Way and I-670

8 PM: The ramp from US 62 WB to I-270 SB will close.

Detour: US 62 WB to I-670 WB to 5th Ave. to I-670 EB to I-270 SB

9 PM: I-270 SB will be reduced to two lanes between I-670 and Johnstown Rd.

10 PM: I-270 SB will be reduced to one lane between I-670 and Johnstown Rd.

12 MIDNIGHT: I-270 SB will close between I-670 and Johnstown Rd.

Detour: I-270 SB to I-670 WB to I-71 SB to I-70 EB to I-270

12 MIDNIGHT: The ramp from I-270 SB to US 62 EB will close.

Detour: I-270 SB to I-670 WB to 5th Ave. to I-670 EB to US 62 EB

6 AM: All lanes and ramps open

I-270 Northbound

6 PM: I-270 NB will be reduced to three lanes between Hamilton Rd. and Johnstown Rd.

7 PM: I-270 NB will be reduced to two lanes between Hamilton Rd. and I-670.

10 PM: I-270 NB will be reduced to one lane between Johnstown Rd. and I-670

12 MIDNIGHT: I-270 NB will close between Johnstown Rd. and I-670

Detour: I-270 NB to I-670 WB to I-71 NB to I-270

6 AM: All lanes open

All work is weather dependent; it may be postponed or cancelled without prior notice.

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ACCEPTING 2019 SPECIALTY CROP BLOCK GRANT PROPOSALS

Assistance available to promote fruits, vegetables, flowers and nut crops in Ohio

REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio (March 22, 2019)-The Ohio Department of Agriculture is now accepting proposals for the 2019 Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, which will provide funding for projects to enhance the competitiveness of crops such as fruits, vegetables, nuts and nursery crops.

Grant funding is provided by the USDA Agriculture Marketing Service. The deadline for on-line grant proposal submissions is Friday, May 3, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. Grants will range from a minimum of $25,000 to a maximum of $150,000. In addition, all applicants must provide a minimum match of 25 percent of the requested grant amount.

Project proposals are sought that will advance the long-term economic viability of the state’s specialty crop industry, while increasing the marketability of specialty crops. Higher rankings will be given to projects that demonstrate profit potential for growers and that could boost employment opportunities in the specialty crop industry.

Food and agricultural non-profit organizations, associations or commodity groups, universities and research institutions are eligible to submit specialty crop proposals. To view SCBG projects previously funded by USDA visit https://www.ams.usda.gov/services/grants/scbgp/awards.

For more information on the 2019 program, available forms, or a copy of the request for proposal, visit the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s website at www.agri.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/oda/divisions/markets/resources/SCBG.

ODNR Provides more than $52,000 to Help Support Ohio Rural Fire Departments

Ohio Department of Natural Resources

COLUMBUS, OH – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) supports Ohio’s rural fire departments and the communities they serve. Through the Community Wildfire Risk Reduction (CWRR) grant program, the ODNR Division of Forestry recently approved grant funding for 25 projects totaling $52,106 for fire departments in rural areas of eastern and southern Ohio.

“Rural fire departments are the front line for wildfires in Ohio,” said Dan Balser, chief of the Division of Forestry. “We strive to help local firefighters be prepared to guard the safety of the communities they serve. These grants will assist those departments in their challenging task of wildfire prevention and suppression.”

CWRR grant projects are focused on supporting wildfire hazard mitigation, public education and firefighter training for rural fire departments. Items purchased through these grants include dry hydrants, computers, tablets, GPS units, outdoor signs, and training room equipment and materials. One unique CWRR project was the cooperative effort between the divisions of Forestry and Parks and Watercraft and local fire departments to install dry hydrants near state park lodge facilities. These additional water supply locations will allow local fire departments to provide faster and more effective fire suppression response to their protection areas. In this project, ODNR provided the cost share, further alleviating financial strain on the local fire departments.

Many rural fire departments in Ohio have very tight budgets, and the majority of their limited resources must be focused on absolute essentials to keep emergency services up and running. The Division of Forestry’s CWRR grant program allows for cost sharing to help make important ancillary programs, like community outreach, risk reduction and safety campaigns, possible.

CWRR grant funding was provided to the Division of Forestry through a competitive process via the U.S. Forest Service.

The Division of Forestry works to promote the wise use and sustainable management of Ohio’s public and private woodlands. To learn more about Ohio’s woodlands, visit forestry.ohiodnr.gov. Follow us on Instagram at @odnrforestry (instagram.com/odnrforestry).

15 Ohio State graduate programs ranked in top 10 by U.S. News & World Report

Three specialties are rated nation’s best

COLUMBUS, Ohio – According to the U.S. News & World Report 2020 edition of America’s Best Graduate Schools, The Ohio State University offers a vast array of top graduate and professional programs, with 15 ranked in the top 10 and three ranked best in the nation.

Top-10 graduate and professional programs include legal dispute resolution (1), student counseling/personnel services (1), technical/vocational education (1), veterinary medicine (4), business supply chain/logistics (6), clinical nurse leader (7), health care management (7), nursing master’s (8), education curriculum/instruction (8), elementary teacher education (9), secondary teacher education, (9), biological/agricultural engineering and business production/operations (9), accounting (10) and public management and leadership (10).

Ohio State has a graduate and professional enrollment of more than 14,000 students in 94 doctoral and 97 master’s programs.

“As a top public research university, graduate education is at the core of what we do,” said executive vice president and provost Bruce McPheron. “This recognition of our outstanding graduate programs reflects the excellence and tremendous depth and breadth of Ohio State’s graduate educational offerings.”

U.S. News’ rankings of graduate and professional programs cover just a small portion of the programs offered at Ohio State. This year, in addition to annual rankings in business, education, engineering, law, medicine and nursing, the magazine offers new rankings for programs in selected health specialties and public affairs.

Below are details from U.S. News & World Report’s 2020 rankings of Ohio State graduate programs, by category.

College of Education and Human Ecology: ranked best in Ohio and 26 nationally out of 392 graduate education programs. The specialty programs in vocational/technical education and student counseling and personnel services ranked 1, curriculum/instruction ranked 8, elementary teacher education and secondary teacher education ranked 9, educational administration/supervision and educational psychology ranked 11 and higher education administration ranked 12.

Fisher College of Business: ranked best in Ohio and 31 nationally among 475 institutions with MBA programs. The specialty program in supply chain/logistics ranked 6, production/operations ranked 9, accounting ranked 10, the part-time MBA program ranked 14, finance ranked 25 and management ranked 26.

College of Engineering: ranked best in Ohio and 27 nationally out of 214 engineering programs that grant doctoral degrees. The specialty program in industrial/manufacturing systems engineering and nuclear engineering ranked 13, materials engineering ranked 14 and aerospace/aeronautical/astronautical engineering ranked 17.

College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences: under engineering programs, biological/agricultural engineering ranked 9.

Moritz College of Law: ranked best in Ohio and 34 in the nation out of 192 accredited law schools. The specialty program in dispute resolution is ranked 1.

College of Medicine: ranked 30 among all research medical schools and 39 in primary care training among 185 accredited medical schools. Specialty programs in pediatrics ranked 21 and obstetrics and gynecology ranked 23.

Health specialties: The graduate program in veterinary medicine ranked 4, health care management ranked 7 and public health ranked 23.

College of Nursing: U.S. News surveyed 584 nursing schools with master’s or doctoral programs. The clinical nurse leader program ranked 7, nursing master’s graduate program ranked 8, doctor of nursing practice ranked 19, family nursing ranked 11 and adult/gerontology, acute care ranked 13.

Glenn College of Public Affairs: ranked best in Ohio and 14 nationally out of 285 master’s programs in public affairs and administration. The specialty program in public management and leadership ranked 10, nonprofit management ranked 12 and public policy analysis ranked 25.

College of Social Work: under health specialties, the college ranked 13.

A number of Ohio State programs earned high marks in previous years and the magazine reprints rankings from previous years in some fields.

American neighbors connect via newspapers

By Melissa Martin

Contributing Columnist

What’s happening in the 50 states of the United States of America? What’s going on in small towns in America? What’s the latest information between the East Coast and the West Coast? North, South, East, West—what’s the news?

Via the Internet by way of online newspapers Americans can reach out and read about each other.

Snow or sun? Quiet or chaos? Births or funerals? Weddings or divorces? Politicians, pastors, or police—what’s the story? Saints and sinners—what’s the scoop? From youngsters to oldsters—what’s the headlines?

Peruse an online newspaper and find out what Americans are doing in beach cities, in rural farmland regions, and in metropolitan places.

Alabama. Alaska. Arizona. Arkansas. What’s up?

California. Colorado. Connecticut. What’s ground-breaking?

Idaho. Illinois. Indiana. Iowa. How are you?

Kansas. Kentucky. What’s shaking?

Maine. Maryland. Massachusetts. Michigan. Minnesota. Mississippi. Missouri. Montana. Any hubbub?

Ohio. Oklahoma. Oregon. What’s the hullabaloo?

Nebraska. Nevada. New Hampshire. New Jersey. New Mexico. New York. North Carolina. North Dakota. How’s it going?

Washington. West Virginia. Wisconsin. Wyoming. What are you up to?

South Carolina. South Dakota. What’s the latest?

Tennessee. Texas. What’s the deal?

Vermont. Virginia. How’s life?

Delaware. Florida. Georgia. Hawaii. Louisiana. Pennsylvania. Rhode Island. Utah. Word?

Read the DeQueen Bee in DeQueen, Arkansas. Scan The Monroe County Buzz, owned by Bee Publishers, in Madisonville, Tennessee. Or explore the Alpine Avalanche in Avalanche, Texas. Learn more about Appalachian Ohio citizens in the Portsmouth Daily Times or the News Watchman. Check out the Gila Herald in Arizona or the Katy News in Texas.

The United States of American is a fascinating nation. “O beautiful for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain. For purple mountain majesties, above the fruited plain. America, America, God shed His grace on thee. And crown thy good with brotherhood, from sea to shining sea.” (Lyrics to America the Beautiful.) From sea to sea, you can read American stories in online newspapers.

Newspapers contain snapshots of the day—national news and local news. People information. Human interest accounts. Every person is a story and has a story; narratives composed of happenings and memories in seconds, minutes, hours, weeks, months, years. Moments that blend in and moments that stand out. What happens between birth and death is my unique story and yours as well. Humans are living calendars.

Events are captured in newspapers—individual time capsules of words. Newspapers are records of humanity’s triumphs and tragedies; successes and failures; tales of the best of times and tales of the worst of times. History is remembered in newspapers.

Connect with your American neighbors via online newspapers. And put National Newspaper Week on your calendar for October 6, 2019. Freedom of the press in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

“He who is without a newspaper is cut off from his species,” declared P. T. Barnum.

Let’s celebrate women in history!

By Melissa Martin

Contributing Columnist

March is National Women’s History Month. Call your gal pals and go out to dinner to honor and remember the fabulous females of the past and present.

The 2019 Women’s History Month theme is “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace & Nonviolence.” The theme honors “women who have led efforts to end war, violence, and injustice and pioneered the use of nonviolence to change society.”

In February 1980, President Jimmy Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th 1980 as National Women’s History Week. www.womenshistory.org/.

History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.” Since 1995, Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.” www.womenshistorymonth.gov/.

The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in commemorating the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.

The 19th Amendment passed in 1920 giving women the right to vote. Organized efforts began in 1848 at the Seneca Falls Convention in New York. Organized by activists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, the convention started the women’s suffrage movement.

The Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative illuminates women’s pivotal roles in building and sustaining our country and will expand what we know of our shared history. www.womenshistory.si.edu/.

Women have made valuable contributions during wartime, both in the civilian and military realm. No matter what the role—military personnel, pilots, nurses, journalists, or factory workers—women’s experience of war remains an important and sometimes overlooked aspect of U.S. history. www.edsitement.neh.gov/.

“Women’s history is full of amazing stories of both ordinary and extraordinary people. Instead of revealing a singular “womanhood,” women’s history makes the diversity of the American experience more visible. While women often faced social constraints and could be restricted by conventional ideas about gender roles, the realities of women’s lives have never been neatly confined to the “domestic” spaces of the home. They have been active participants in American society—as political activists, intellectuals, innovators, entrepreneurs, laborers, and educators.” www.nps.gov/.

Ohio’s Women

A round of applause for the women in Ohio’s history.

General Assembly: 133 Recognizing Women’s History Month in Ohio, March 2019 (S. R. No. 56) adopted by the Ohio Senate. www.ohiosenate.gov/.

A panel of women veterans who served our country will tell their stories in a panel discussion sponsored by the Ohio Department of Veterans Services in honor of Women’s History Month on March 22, 2019 in the Ohio History Center auditorium in Columbus, Ohio. More than 67,000 women veterans reside in Ohio. They have served with distinction in every war in a variety of capacities and became casualties or prisoners of war. www.ohiohistory.org/.

Internationally famous was Newark, Ohio native Jerrie Mock, the first woman to fly solo around the world. Beginning and ending her ground-breaking 1964 flight in Columbus, Ohio, Mock piloted a single-engine Cessna 180 named the “Spirit of Columbus” and logged 22,860 miles in 29 days. During that global journey, she became the first woman pilot to solo over the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and when Mock winged her way from Honolulu to Columbus in 1966, she set the record for the longest nonstop flight by a woman. www.ohio.org/.

Born in Lorain, Ohio, Toni Morrison is a renowned American novelist most known for her award-winning tale, Beloved. This true story of an enslaved black woman won Morrison the Pulitzer prize and the American Book Award in 1988. She also later won the Nobel Prize in Literature and was presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama. www.ohio.org/.

The following poem I wrote is dedicated to the pioneer women of history:

Women of Resiliency

Steel mind,

Bend me

And I straighten.

Iron spirit,

Melt me

And I solidify.

Granite soul,

Chip me

And I reconstruct.

Diamond nerves,

Crush me

And I radiate.

Ruby heart,

Pierce me

And I revive.

Copper body,

Tarnish me

And I glisten.

Golden voice,

Silence me

And I speak louder.

Melissa Martin, Ph.D., is an author, columnist, and educator. She lives in Southern County.

AFL Transactions-#14-2019

Thu 3/21/2019 6:39 PM

BALTIMORE

TRADED TO COLUMBUS

OL Nathan Isles 6’6 340 1.4.1992 North Carolina A&T R

TRADED FROM COLUMBUS

Claim Order Position #1

COLUMBUS

TRADED TO BALTIMORE

Claim Order Position #1

TRADED FROM BALTIMORE

OL Nathan Isles 6’6 340 1.4.1992 North Carolina A&T R

Senate Transportation Committee Chairman Rob McColley, a Republican from Napoleon, explains the state Senate’s decision to lower Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18-cent per gallon tax increase to 6 cents per gallon, on Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Columbus, Ohio. McColley says the Senate’s 6 cents proposal, approved Thursday, would take care of existing roads and bridges in the state. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/03/web1_122549379-6a7eadaa0d3c45e9a6d48b088bf4b8c5.jpgSenate Transportation Committee Chairman Rob McColley, a Republican from Napoleon, explains the state Senate’s decision to lower Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18-cent per gallon tax increase to 6 cents per gallon, on Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Columbus, Ohio. McColley says the Senate’s 6 cents proposal, approved Thursday, would take care of existing roads and bridges in the state. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)

Staff & Wire Reports