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FILE - In a Tuesday, May 8, 2018 file photo, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray speaks to a crowd of supporters during an election night event, in Columbus, Ohio. Cordray says Ohio’s opioid crisis is ravaging families and communities across the state. Cordray faults Republicans including opponent Attorney General Mike DeWine for not doing enough, and says he would treat the issue as a state of emergency and pull together federal, state and local resources. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)

FILE - In a Tuesday, May 8, 2018 file photo, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray speaks to a crowd of supporters during an election night event, in Columbus, Ohio. Cordray says Ohio’s opioid crisis is ravaging families and communities across the state. Cordray faults Republicans including opponent Attorney General Mike DeWine for not doing enough, and says he would treat the issue as a state of emergency and pull together federal, state and local resources. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)


FILE - IN A Tuesday, May 8, 2018 file photo, Ohio Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine addresses supporters after winning the primary election, in Columbus, Ohio. DeWine has said fighting the opioid crisis will be a top priority as governor. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston, File)


Democrat running for governor focuses on Ohio opioid crisis

By DAN SEWELL

Associated Press

Monday, June 4

CINCINNATI (AP) — The Democratic nominee for governor said Monday that Ohio deadly opioid crisis impacts people throughout the state.

“Everybody’s been touched by this,” Richard Cordray said. “It’s ravaged our families, it’s ravaged our communities; Ohio’s one of the worst states in the nation for this crisis.”

He said the drug issue’s effects show up on jobs, families and schools. Cordray focused on opioids and other health issues such as infant mortality in discussions with local authorities and health officials and advocates at Springfield Regional Hospital in western Ohio and the Cincinnati firefighters’ union hall.

The Hamilton County coroner in Cincinnati has said overdose deaths in the county jumped by 31 percent in 2017, to 529 deaths. Ohio has been among states with the highest overdose death rates.

Cordray faults Republicans, including GOP gubernatorial candidate and current Attorney General Mike DeWine, for not doing enough as overdose death rates climbed in the state. Cordray, who served as Barack Obama’s federal consumer protection chief, has been emphasizing differences on issues as he takes on one of the state’s best-known politicians. DeWine defeated Cordray for attorney general in 2010, and Republicans have dominated statewide races in recent years including Donald Trump’s decisive 2016 Ohio presidential race victory.

Cordray says he’d treat the opioid issue as a state of emergency and pull together federal, state and local resources with community-based efforts, while protecting Medicaid expansion and increasing funding of treatment and services.

DeWine has said fighting the opioid crisis will be a top priority if he’s elected governor, and he plans to create a cabinet-level position to coordinate the anti-opioid effort, expand drug courts, treatment and drug prevention education.

His campaign says he worked aggressively to close “pill mills” in southern Ohio and arrest drug traffickers. Ohio also is among the states that have sued drugmakers.

Follow Dan Sewell at http://www.twitter.com/dansewell

Final WCOL Celeste Center Concert announced + three “Big Free Concerts” added

Final concert announcement: Lee Brice

Ohio State Fair officials have added the final WCOL Celeste Center Concert, country musician Lee Brice, to perform on Friday, August 3. Tickets go on sale this Friday, June 8 at 10 am.

Lee Brice – tickets go on sale Friday, June 8 at 10 am

Big Free Concerts: Sister Hazel, Love and Theft, Welshly Arms

In addition, for the first time, the Ohio State Fair is adding big-name artists to the roster of talented musicians performing at its free Main Street Stage. Traditionally featuring Ohio-born musicians and up-and-coming performers from around the country, the Fair has added nationally-recognized groups including Sister Hazel, Love and Theft and Welshly Arms to its line-up of free entertainment.

Sister Hazel’s most successful single, “All for You,” hit No. 11 on the Billboard Hot 100. The group has continued to produce their alternative blend of country, southern rock and pop for more than 20 years.

As duo Love and Theft, Stephen Barker Liles and Eric Gunderson launched their career with the No. 1 country smash hit “Angel Eyes” and Top 10 hit “Runaway.”

Cleveland’s Welshly Arms recently released their 2018 full-length debut No Place is Home. Between stops at some of the country’s greatest music festivals including Summerfest, Firefly and Lollapalooza, Welshly Arms will perform in their home state at the Ohio State Fair.

WCOL Celeste Center Concerts

The Beach Boys

TLC / En Vogue

Trevor Noah

Lee Brice – tickets go on sale Friday, June 8 at 10 am

WCOL Celeste Center – Free Shows

All-Ohio State Fair Band & Youth Choir

The Rat Pack is Back

Sale of Champions

List of acts

WCOL Celeste Center

The Beach Boys Wed., July 25, 2018, 7 pm $30

Reba McEntire Thurs., July 26, 2018, 7 pm $55, $65 Sold out

TLC / En Vogue Fri., July 27, 2018, 7 pm $30, $25

The Commodores Sat., July 28, 2018, 7 pm $25

Trevor Noah Sun., July 29, 2018, 7:30 pm $35

All-Ohio State Fair Band & Youth Choir Concert* Sun., July 29, 2018, 1 pm Free (no tickets required)

Casting Crowns Mon., July 30, 2018, 7 pm $25

The Rat Pack is Back* Tues., July 31, 2018, 12:30 pm Free (no tickets required)

KIDZ BOP LIVE 2018 Tues., July 31, 2018, 6:30 pm $15

Brothers Osborne Wed., August 1, 2018, 7 pm $25, $35

Jeff Dunham Thurs., August 2, 2018, 7 pm $40

Just announced: Lee Brice Fri., Aug. 3, 7 pm $25, $35, $50 Tickets on sale Friday, June 8 at 10 am

Styx / Cheap Trick Sat., August 4, 2018, 7 pm $35, $45

Sale of Champions Livestock Auction* Sun., August 5, 2018, 2 pm Free (no tickets required)

Just announced: Big Free Concerts at Main Street Stage

Sister Hazel* Sat., July 28, 2018, 8:30 pm Free (no tickets required)

Welshly Arms* Wed., August 1, 2018, 8 pm Free (no tickets required)

Love and Theft* Thurs., August 2, 2018, 8:30 pm Free (no tickets required)

* Tickets are not required for these shows

The following options are available to purchase tickets:

Ticketmaster online – Visit www.ticketmaster.com/OhioStateFair

Ticketmaster phone centers – Call 1-800-745-3000

Concert tickets purchased before arriving at the Fair include Fair admission. Unless otherwise noted, there is a limit of eight tickets per person, per show on the first day of sale. Please note that Ticketmaster no longer offers retail outlets.

The Ohio Expo Center is proud to host the Ohio State Fair. With big-name entertainment, educational activities, hundreds of exhibits and one of the largest junior livestock shows in the nation, the 2018 Ohio State Fair will run July 25 – Aug. 5.

The following options are available to purchase tickets:

Ticketmaster online – Visit www.ticketmaster.com/OhioStateFair

Ticketmaster phone centers – Call 1-800-745-3000

Coffee helps teams work together, study suggests

Ohio State University

Caffeine makes people more positive by making them more alert

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Good teamwork begins with a cup of coffee for everyone, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that people gave more positive reviews for their group’s performance on a task – and their own contribution – if they drank caffeinated coffee beforehand.

A second study showed that people talked more in a group setting under the influence of caffeinated coffee – but they also were more on-topic than those who drank decaf.

Coffee seems to work its magic in teams by making people more alert, said Amit Singh, co-author of the study and a doctoral student in marketing at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business.

“We found that increased alertness was what led to the positive results for team performance,” Singh said.

“Not surprisingly, people who drank caffeinated coffee tended to be more alert.”

Singh conducted the study with Vasu Unnava and H. Rao Unnava, both formerly at Ohio State and now with the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Davis. The study appears online in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

While many studies have looked at how caffeine affects individual performance, this is the first to examine the impact it has on teams, Singh said.

The first study involved 72 undergraduate students who said they were coffee drinkers. They were instructed not to drink coffee before the experiment.

Half of them first participated in what they were told was a coffee-tasting task. They were split into groups of five. After drinking a cup of coffee and rating its flavor, they were given 30 minutes of filler tasks to give the caffeine a chance to kick in. The other half of the participants did the coffee tasting at the end of the experiment.

Each group then read about and were asked to discuss a controversial topic – the Occupy movement, a liberal movement that highlighted social and economic inequality. After a 15-minute discussion, group members evaluated themselves and the other group members.

Results showed that those who drank the coffee before the discussion rated themselves and their fellow team members more positively than did those who drank coffee after the discussion, Singh said.

The second study was similar, except that 61 students all drank coffee at the beginning of the study. However, half drank decaf and the others drank caffeinated brew.

Those who drank caffeinated coffee rated themselves and their fellow group members more positively than those who drank decaf.

It had to do with alertness.

All participants rated how alert they felt at the end of the study, and those who drank the caffeinated coffee rated themselves as more alert than the others.

A key finding was that people who rated themselves as more alert – whether they drank caffeinated coffee or not – also tended to give higher marks to themselves and their fellow group members.

This suggests that any intervention that increases alertness (such as exercise) may also produce similar results, which the authors propose in the paper as a future research topic.

“We suspect that when people are more alert they see themselves and the other group members contributing more, and that gives them a more positive attitude,” Singh said.

But the caffeine does more than just increase good feelings. The researchers did an analysis of the group discussion in the second study, rating how much each group member talked and stayed on topic.

Results showed that people tended to talk more after drinking caffeine, but they also tended to stay more on topic.

“They’re talking about more relevant things after drinking caffeinated coffee,” he said.

One might think that if people are talking more about a controversial topic like the Occupy movement, that may cause friction in the group. But that’s not what the study suggests.

People who drank caffeinated coffee were more likely than those who drank decaf to say they would be willing to work with their group again.

“Even though they are talking more, agreeing and disagreeing, they still want to work with them again,” Singh said.

“Coffee didn’t seem to make group discussions too uncomfortable and disagreeable.”

FILE – In a Tuesday, May 8, 2018 file photo, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray speaks to a crowd of supporters during an election night event, in Columbus, Ohio. Cordray says Ohio’s opioid crisis is ravaging families and communities across the state. Cordray faults Republicans including opponent Attorney General Mike DeWine for not doing enough, and says he would treat the issue as a state of emergency and pull together federal, state and local resources. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/06/web1_120683990-ad4d530907fb44918edf1ac6086bb839.jpgFILE – In a Tuesday, May 8, 2018 file photo, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray speaks to a crowd of supporters during an election night event, in Columbus, Ohio. Cordray says Ohio’s opioid crisis is ravaging families and communities across the state. Cordray faults Republicans including opponent Attorney General Mike DeWine for not doing enough, and says he would treat the issue as a state of emergency and pull together federal, state and local resources. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)

FILE – IN A Tuesday, May 8, 2018 file photo, Ohio Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine addresses supporters after winning the primary election, in Columbus, Ohio. DeWine has said fighting the opioid crisis will be a top priority as governor. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/06/web1_120683990-643359d0fd5b4e69a596ad39b84868ef.jpgFILE – IN A Tuesday, May 8, 2018 file photo, Ohio Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine addresses supporters after winning the primary election, in Columbus, Ohio. DeWine has said fighting the opioid crisis will be a top priority as governor. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston, File)

Staff & Wire Reports