Pence responds to Critics


Staff & Wire Reports



Vice President Mike Pence speaks at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), at ICE headquarters, Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. Pence is defending federal immigration authorities charged with detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants and accusing Democrats of making opposition to the agency the "center" of their party. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Vice President Mike Pence speaks at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), at ICE headquarters, Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. Pence is defending federal immigration authorities charged with detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants and accusing Democrats of making opposition to the agency the "center" of their party. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)


Vice President Mike Pence, right, shakes hands with Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, next to Acting Director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Ronald Vitiello, as Pence arrives to speak at ICE Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)


Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, waits to speak at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), to introduce Vice President Mike Pence, at ICE headquarters, Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. Pence is defending federal immigration authorities charged with detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants and accusing Democrats of making opposition to the agency the "center" of their party. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)


NEWS

Pence rips Democrats on immigration, defends ICE

By KEN THOMAS

Associated Press

Saturday, July 7

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence on Friday accused Democrats of making opposition to the federal immigration agency central to their party, calling for an end to “spurious attacks” on U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

In an address at ICE headquarters infused with electoral politics, Pence noted that some prominent Democrats had called for the abolition of the agency charged with detaining and deporting migrants entering the country illegally. He said President Donald Trump would fully support immigration enforcement agents and warned that the abolition of ICE would lead to more illegal immigration, human trafficking, violent crime and the proliferation of drugs and “vicious gangs.”

“It isn’t just the expression of the radical left that has been speaking out against ICE. The truth is that opposition of ICE has moved to the center of the Democratic Party itself,” Pence said in a speech to ICE employees. “Just when you thought the Democrats couldn’t move farther to the left, leading members of the Democratic Party, including candidates for higher office, are actually openly advocating the abolition of ICE.”

“The American people have the right to their opinions, but these spurious attacks on ICE by our political leaders must stop,” Pence said.

The dispute over the federal agency has emerged as a political fault line after the Trump administration began separating migrant children from their parents after they crossed the U.S.-Mexico border, leading to nationwide protests last weekend. Trump has made border security a focus of his message as he aims to prevent a Democratic takeover of Congress in the November midterm elections.

Pence made no mention of the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy or the caring for unaccompanied children, who are overseen by the Department of Health and Human Services. As the vice president was greeting ICE employees after the speech, he did not respond to a shouted question from a reporter asking if separating children “was a Christian thing to do.”

ICE has come under fire from Democratic Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, all of whom were named by Pence as seeking the abolition of the agency. The three Democrats are among a large field of potential 2020 challengers to Trump.

While some Democrats in the House and Senate have raised the prospect of eliminating ICE, no top Democrats in the House or Senate have called for such a move.

Gillibrand has said ICE is not “working as intended” and pushed for separating the criminal justice aspect of the agency from immigration issues. Responding to Pence’s speech, she tweeted that immigration “is a strength of America. Our country needs a new agency that works, and it needs bipartisan immigration reform.”

Warren has called Trump’s immigration policies “immoral” and said the U.S. needs to rebuild its immigration system “from top to bottom, starting by replacing ICE with something that reflects our values,” while de Blasio has said ICE’s time “has come and gone.”

In his remarks, Pence also referred to a “leading candidate” for New York governor who had “appallingly called this agency a ‘terrorist organization.’”

Cynthia Nixon, an actress and liberal activist challenging New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo in the state’s Democratic primary, tweeted that she could “think of no better description than to call ICE a terrorist organization, and I will wear any criticism from mike_pence as a badge of honor.”

On Twitter follow Ken Thomas at https://twitter.com/KThomasDC

VIEWS

A trade story about newspapers

From The Akron Beacon Journal

President Trump had a question for Justin Trudeau, the Canadian prime minister: “Didn’t you guys burn down the White House?” According to news accounts, the president’s inquiry arrived during an ill-tempered phone call last month to discuss the prospect of tariffs on steel and aluminum from Canada, Mexico and our European partners.

Trudeau, along with many others, has been struggling with the president’s justification, that the products from Canada threaten American national security. The prime minister recalls the many times Americans and Canadians have fought shoulder to shoulder, how the countries have benefited via the NATO alliance.

Together, all are stronger.

This is what the president seems to miss, something he appeared to confirm as he departed the Group of Seven summit in Quebec on Saturday: “We’re the piggy bank that everybody is robbing. And that ends.”

Canada did not burn the White House. That was the British, in 1814, or a long time ago. Hard to say what the president meant with his question. Change the subject? Joke, as he likes to insist later? What the moment captures is the sense of grievance in his approach to trade.

NEWS

Local students graduate from Oregon State University

News from Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will hold its 149th commencement on Saturday, June 16, beginning at 10:30 a.m. in Reser Stadium.

OSU is one of the few large universities in the nation to hand out students’ actual diplomas during the commencement ceremony.

The commencement speaker is Harley Jessup, an Oregon State University alumnus and renowned animation production designer who has won an Academy Award and an Emmy Award for visual effects. Jessup also will receive an honorary doctorate from the university.

Jessup, now with Pixar Animation Studios, served as production designer for “Coco,” which won the Academy Award this year in the category of Best Animated Feature Film. Some of his other film credits include “The Hunt for Red October,” “Ghostbusters II,” “Monsters, Inc.,” “Ratatouille” and “James and the Giant Peach.”

Commencement is free and open to the public; no tickets are necessary. More information about OSU’s graduation is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/events/commencement/.

Local students graduating this June from Oregon State include:

OHIO

Athens: Amanda L. Watters, Bachelor of Science, Environmental Economics and Policy.

Beavercreek: Lauren M. Milliken, Master of Science, Robotics.

Cincinnati: Erin A. Wahler, Master of Education, College Student Services Administration.

Cleveland: Ashley M. Voisinet, Bachelor of Arts, Anthropology.

Columbus: Sean S. Bodo, Bachelor of Science, Sociology; Eric Podolsky, Bachelor of Science, Computer Science.

Delaware: Kelsey E. Rose, Bachelor of Science, Agricultural Sciences.

Gahanna: Jeffery E. Goss, Bachelor of Science, Computer Science.

Hamilton: Kelli N. Hoover, Bachelor of Science, Agricultural Sciences.

Johnstown: Rebekah A. Slotterbeck, Bachelor of Science, Horticulture.

Lakewood: Donna E. Friedman, Master of Natural Resources, Natural Resources.

Newcomerstown: Ethan H. Perkins, Bachelor of Science, Economics.

Oxford: Kristyn R. Vitale, Doctor of Philosophy, Animal Science.

Portsmouth: Lyndsay H. Hieneman, Bachelor of Arts, German.

Reynoldsburg: August D. Lautt, Bachelor of Science, Computer Science.

Uniontown: Andrew M. Schon, Bachelor of Science, Computer Science.

Worthington: Maria Danna, Master of Arts, Applied Anthropology.

Xenia: McKenzie L. Redberg, Bachelor of Science, Kinesiology.

The Ohio State University announces summer commencement speaker

Alan Michaels is dean of the Moritz College of Law

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Alan C. Michaels, dean of the Moritz College of Law, will deliver The Ohio State University’s summer commencement address. Approximately 1,500 degrees will be awarded at the ceremony, which begins at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 5 at the Jerome Schottenstein Center.

Michaels, the Edwin M. Cooperman Chair in Law, joined Ohio State in 1995 and has served as dean since 2008. In June, he announced plans to conclude his term as dean in June, 2019 and return to the faculty. The College of Law has thrived during his decade of service as dean, with many innovative programs contributing to nationally leading outcomes for graduates and record-breaking fundraising powering both access and nationally acclaimed research. Over the last three years, he has also co-taught a course entitled The Civil Rights Movement and the Supreme Court with Ohio State University President Michael V. Drake.

“It is my pleasure to announce Moritz College of Law Dean Alan Michaels as our speaker for the 419th commencement ceremony,” said President Drake. “A friend, colleague and instructor to many across Buckeye Nation, Dean Michaels has devoted more than 20 years to advancing academic and research excellence at Ohio State. His commitment to expanding pathways to an exemplary and affordable legal education represents the very best qualities of our university’s founding land-grant mission. I am confident his message will resonate among our graduates as they embark to change this world for the better.”

Dean Michaels graduated from Harvard College magna cum laude in 1983 and from Columbia University School of Law in 1986.

Following graduation from law school, he clerked for Chief Judge Wilfred Feinberg of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and then Associate Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Dean Michaels spent three years in private practice representing the Major League Baseball Players Association and then served for four years as a prosecutor in New York County before joining Ohio State. From 2001 to 2003, he served Moritz as associate dean for faculty and also has been a visiting professor at the University of Michigan.

Dean Michaels’ research, primarily in the area of the criminal intent in crimes and in the adjudicatory portion of criminal procedure, has been published in a variety of leading journals, including the Columbia Law Review, the Harvard Law Review, and the Southern California Law Review.

He is coauthor with Professors Joshua Dressler and Ric Simmons of Understanding Criminal Procedure (4th edition) and serves as co-managing editor of the Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law. Dean Michaels was the recipient of the 1998-99 Outstanding Scholarly Paper Award from the Association of American Law Schools. He was chosen as the Outstanding Professor by the graduating classes of 1999 and 2000.

Dean Michaels has taught courses in criminal law, sports law, white-collar crime and criminal procedure: adjudication.

Also during the ceremony, John C. “Jack” Fisher, executive vice president of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, Inc., and former university trustee, will receive the university’s Distinguished Service Award.

Spring 2018 Dean’s List announced at John Carroll University

News from John Carroll University

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, OH (07/09/2018)— Several area students have earned a place on the Dean’s List at John Carroll University for the Spring 2018 semester.

Students eligible for the Dean’s List must have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours within one semester and have a quality grade point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale.

Local students are listed below:

  • Kathryn Hoepfner of Westerville (43081)
  • Joseph Murnane of Westerville (43082)
  • Jessica Swisher of Westerville (43082)
  • Olivia Talamo of Westerville (43082)

John Carroll University, founded in 1886 as Saint Ignatius College, is located in University Heights, Ohio, in suburban Cleveland. Its Jesuit Catholic mission inspires individuals to excel in learning, leadership, and service in the region and the world. John Carroll University is recognized nationally for an exceptional four-year graduation rate, teaching excellence, and a commitment to living a faith that does justice as central to its mission. John Carroll is one of 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States.

Sculpting Starts on the 2018 Butter Cow

American Dairy Association Mideast

Sculptors will begin molding the highly-anticipated butter cow! They’ll start by building wooden and steel frames to hold the weight of the butter (as seen in this picture from last year to the left). Then, they’ll slice the butter and layer it to cover the frames. After hours of molding and smoothing, the sculpture will start to come together in its final form.

The 2017 sculpture paid tribute to the beverage that keeps student athletes MOO-ving… chocolate milk! But the 2018 icon or theme, chosen by the American Dairy Association Mideast, remains one of our best-kept secrets.

VIEWS

Arming teachers

By Basma Ismail

On May 22nd, 2014, Donald Trump announced to the world via his Twitter account that Hillary Clinton accused him of wanting to bring guns into classrooms. Almost four years later, Trump tried to convince us that arming teachers while on school grounds is the answer to school shootings and massacres.

With the lack of laws and training regarding carrying and purchasing guns, more students are likely to die in schools if Trump’s ideas are applied. He argues that it will allow teachers to respond quickly to possible shootings and be better equipped to protect their students. Studies show that aggression among students is more likely to increase while in the presence of a weapon which increases the chance of casualties. It perceives educators as killers as they are ready to shoot and kill at any given moment. It also leads to the increase of behavioral issues as students are aware of its presence, which might lead to feelings of fear instead of feeling safe or a student trying to steal the gun and use it. Another potential consequence is the killing of teachers since the police are more likely to shoot whoever is in the possession of a gun upon being called to the scene

Whoever said that being in a classroom with armed teachers would make students feel safe? As a woman of color, I would not step foot in such a place nor would I want my daughters there. If mass shooters can buy guns and go on a shooting spree, what makes the teachers any different? They are humans as well, not angels with all the right answers to chemical equations and calculus problems. People get angry, have psychological problems and deal with struggles and pressure in different ways. And some go on shooting sprees.

Millions watched Senior Deputy Ben Fields grab a 15-year-old African American student from her seat by the neck, throw her to the ground, then drag her out of the classroom. You might have wondered if the girl had done something such as threatening the teacher or her classmates to warrant the police being called on her while still seated in her class. But nope, she did not. She had her cell phone out which was against the rules. She refused to hand it over which resulted in her being manhandled and humiliated at this rebellious tender age. Maybe we should care more about educating our teachers on adolescent’s mental health and how to mentor them instead of scarring them for life. Perhaps we should be certain our teachers and school officers are emotionally mature enough to work with children.

School is a place where children not only study science and history but also learn life skills, lessons, and values. What we should be doing is teaching conflict resolution in schools rather than punishment. Incorporating its practices among teachers, administrators, students and parents has been proven to result in higher grades, ability to solve problems, and higher self-esteem.

Help us bring conflict resolution education to our classrooms, not guns!

Basma Ismail, mother of two, writes for PeaceVoice and studies Conflict Resolution at Portland State University.

Columbus Native Participates in World’s Largest International Maritime Warfare Exercise

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jackson Brown, Navy Office of Community Outreach

PEARL HARBOR – A 2017 Independence High School graduate and Columbus, Ohio, native is serving in the U.S. Navy as part of the world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise, Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).

Fireman Recruit Jeremy Brace is a machinery repairman aboard USS Carl Vinson, currently operating out of San Diego.

A Navy machinery repairman is responsible for repairing and creating various parts and tools that are used on the ship.

Brace applies the lessons learned from Columbus to working in the Navy.

“Growing up, I learned how to focus on work and to handle my business, which has helped me in the Navy,” said Brace.

As the world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring safety at sea and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971.

The theme of RIMPAC 2018 is Capable, Adaptive, Partners. The participating nations and forces exercise a wide range of capabilities and demonstrate the inherent flexibility of maritime forces. These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security operations to sea control and complex warfighting. The relevant, realistic training program includes, gunnery, missile, anti-submarine and air defense exercises, as well as amphibious, counter-piracy, mine clearance operations, explosive ordnance disposal and diving and salvage operations.

“I’m looking forward to meeting people from all the different countries during this exercise,” said Brace.

This is the first time Israel, Sri Lanka and Vietnam are participating in RIMPAC. Additional firsts include New Zealand serving as sea combat commander and Chile serving as combined force maritime component commander. This is the first time a non-founding RIMPAC nation (Chile) will hold a component commander leadership position.

“I’m proud of graduating machinery repairman ‘A’ School, it was a tough school with a high attrition rate,” said Brace.

Twenty-six nations, 46 surface ships, five submarines, and more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel will participate in the biennial Rim of the Pacific Exercise. This year’s exercise includes forces from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom, the United States and Vietnam.

As a member of the U.S. Navy, Brace and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“The Navy has shown me that I like making things,” said Brace. “It’s satisfying to know I can make something for the ship that’s going to last for a while. Serving in the Navy gives me pride and confidence in myself. I’m proud to tell people that I serve in the Navy.”

Additional information about RIMPAC is available at http://www.cpf.navy.mil

Vice President Mike Pence speaks at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), at ICE headquarters, Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. Pence is defending federal immigration authorities charged with detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants and accusing Democrats of making opposition to the agency the "center" of their party. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120899999-3eb1bccb709242f58044426d47ef2f15.jpgVice President Mike Pence speaks at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), at ICE headquarters, Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. Pence is defending federal immigration authorities charged with detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants and accusing Democrats of making opposition to the agency the "center" of their party. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Vice President Mike Pence, right, shakes hands with Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, next to Acting Director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Ronald Vitiello, as Pence arrives to speak at ICE Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120899999-f6d933d906454c6582633b7530cc5a34.jpgVice President Mike Pence, right, shakes hands with Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, next to Acting Director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Ronald Vitiello, as Pence arrives to speak at ICE Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, waits to speak at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), to introduce Vice President Mike Pence, at ICE headquarters, Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. Pence is defending federal immigration authorities charged with detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants and accusing Democrats of making opposition to the agency the "center" of their party. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120899999-91d6a4de785c49949d8d787aac6279d6.jpgHomeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, waits to speak at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), to introduce Vice President Mike Pence, at ICE headquarters, Friday, July 6, 2018, in Washington. Pence is defending federal immigration authorities charged with detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants and accusing Democrats of making opposition to the agency the "center" of their party. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Staff & Wire Reports