Protesting Immigration, Pipelines


Staff & Wire Reports



A member of the clergy is taken away in handcuffs after being arrested protesting in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. A group of 17 protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the ICE facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

A member of the clergy is taken away in handcuffs after being arrested protesting in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. A group of 17 protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the ICE facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)


A protester is taken away in cuffs after being arrested in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. A group of protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)


Protesters are processed after being arrested in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. Protesters who were blocking the entrance to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles have been led away in handcuffs. A group of protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)


NEWS

LA protesters handcuffed after blocking immigration facility

By AP

Monday, July 2

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Protesters who were blocking the entrance to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles have been led away in handcuffs.

A group of 17 protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the facility Monday morning.

The group, which included faith and community leaders, locked arms and chanted, “Shut down ICE!”

Police responded, declared the protest an unlawful assembly and ordered the protesters to disperse. Officers eventually began taking the protesters into custody, handcuffing them with plastic zip-tie cuffs.

Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Bonin, a Democrat who was among the protesters blocking the entrance to the ICE facility, said the agency was “putting children in baby jails.”

VIEWS

The Public Has Been Ignored For Too Long On Pipelines

The government’s own watchdogs agree: Regulators have been ignoring local communities and siding with industry way too often.

By Todd Larsen | Jun 27, 2018

In school, we’re taught that the U.S. is a nation of laws, and no one is above the law. But for communities nationwide fighting natural gas pipelines, they quickly find that the law is stacked against them.

Imagine receiving notice one day that a pipeline is going to cut through your property — maybe just yards away from your home, mowing down old growth trees, and cutting through pristine springs. The pipeline will endanger your family, damage your business, threaten your drinking water, and lower the value of your home. It could leak or even explode.

But when you go through the process of objecting to the permitting of the pipeline, or file a case in court when that doesn’t work, you discover that the pipeline company is allowed to tear down trees on your property and begin work before your case is ever decided.

That’s why communities let down by officials, regulators, and courts are turning to direct action to fight pipelines.

Last year, a group of Pennsylvania nuns from the Adorers of the Blood of Christ Order built an open-air chapel in a corn field. Their chapel sat right in the path of the Atlantic Sunrise pipeline in a bid to raise awareness of complaint they filed against the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to keep the pipeline off their land.

This year, in Virginia and West Virginia, other protesters — mostly women — have been sitting in trees for as long as 57 days straight, to protest the fact that state and federal regulators have repeatedly sided with the builders of the Mountain Valley Pipeline over the local communities in the pipelines’ path.

Most of the blame for the rubber stamping of pipelines across the country lies with FERC. The little-known agency wields immense power when it comes to natural gas infrastructure. All new interstate natural gas pipelines come before FERC for review. And over the past three decades, FERC has approved almost every pipeline that’s come before it.

These approvals are handed down even when communities show compelling evidence that the pipeline isn’t needed, that it’s a danger to their community, and that it will exacerbate climate change by increasing fracked natural gas. FERC consistently ignores the voices of the communities impacted by its decisions.

That’s not just the opinion of community activists — it’s also the findings of a report issued by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Inspector General. The report found that FERC makes it difficult for the public to weigh in on pipelines and isn’t listening to the concerns of communities, particularly poor communities.

Ironically, the report was issued at a moment when FERC itself is calling for feedback on its pipeline process (which has been extended to July 25). Tens of thousands of people will be weighing in to tell FERC all the ways in which its current processes are broken — and how the agency could reform the pipeline review process to value people, communities, consumers, and the environment, rather than always siding with industry.

Recently, after receiving an outpouring of concern from the public, all five of FERC’s commissioners opposed the Trump administration’s call to preference coal and nuclear power on the electric grid — a move that would harm American consumers. If FERC hears from enough Americans that the agency’s rubber-stamping of natural gas pipelines is also not in the national interest, maybe it’ll start to reform its review practices.

If not, FERC will see increasing protests nationwide as communities do everything they can to protect their health and well-being from pipelines and fracking.

Todd Larsen is the Executive Co-Director for Green America for Consumer and Corporate Engagement. Distributed by OtherWords.org.

NEWS

America’s Run for the Fallen has now Crossed Half the United States in Coast-to-Coast Run

Runners Enter Indiana on Way to Arlington

June 25, 2018

On June 20, runners honoring fallen American service members crossed the Illinois-Indiana border on their cross-country run to Arlington National Cemetery. “America’s Run for the Fallen” is organized by Honor and Remember, a veteran and Gold Star Family organization that seeks to individually recognize nearly 20,000 Fallen Service Members since the USS Cole (October 2000). Each mile along the 6,000 mile route from Fort Irwin, California to Arlington National Cemetery, runners pause for a short ceremony to remember by calling each name out loud of the soldiers, sailors, airmen, coast guard and marines killed on a different day since the War on Terror began.

This year, “America’s Run for the Fallen” marks the ten-year-anniversary of the first Run for the Fallen. But never has there been a Fallen Military Tribute on this scale or magnitude. The event has grown both in the number of participants and, sadly, the number of service members honored. By the time the race finishes in August, Gold Star families, veterans, and other supporters from the community will have run 6,000 miles through 19 states on their journey from Fort Irwin, California to Arlington National Cemetery.

The 2018 “America’s Run for the Fallen” began on April 7th in Fort Irwin and has since covered over 3,000 miles. On June 20, runners crossed into Indiana, with eight states remaining in their route. From Indiana, runners will follow a set course through Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia on their way to their final destination and remembrance ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery on August 5.

Honor and Remember is a nationally recognized non-profit organization which aims to “honor and remember every American fallen service member and recognize the enduring sacrifice of every family.”

Cincinnati-Area Man Indicted in Alleged Roof Scam

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine

July 2, 2018

(CINCINNATI)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine today announced that a Milford man has been indicted for allegedly stealing money from Cincinnati-area homeowners after offering to repair their roofs.

Robert J. Collins, 35, was indicted by a Hamilton County grand jury on the following charges:

Theft from the elderly, third-degree felonies (two counts)

Theft from the elderly, fourth-degree felonies (six counts)

Theft, fourth-degree felonies (four counts)

Theft, fifth-degree felonies (six counts)

Collins is accused of stealing over $50,000 from nine homeowners. According to investigators, he operated under the name United Home Solutions and offered to repair homeowners’ roofs, but after homeowners paid for materials, Collins allegedly failed to make any repairs or deliver any materials.

The case was investigated by the Ohio Attorney General’s Economic Crimes Unit. Attorneys with the Economic Crimes Unit have been appointed as special prosecutors by the Hamilton County Prosecutor’s Office.

Consumers who suspect a scam or unfair sales practice should contact the Ohio Attorney General’s Office at www.OhioProtects.org or 800-282-0515.

THE SMITHEREENS with Special Guest Marshall Crenshaw to Play the Southern July 28

The Smithereens with Special Guest Vocalist Marshall Crenshaw to Play the Southern July 28

Guest vocalist Marshall Crenshaw joins original members Jim Babjak, Mike Mesaros, and Dennis Diken to perform Smithereens favorites including “Blood and Roses” and “Behind the Wall of Sleep,” deep catalog numbers (“One Look at You” and “Can’t Go Home Anymore”), and great covers (the Beatles’ “When I Get Home” and the Outsiders’ “Time Won’t Let Me”).

CAPA presents The Smithereens featuring special guest vocalist Marshall Crenshaw at the Southern Theatre (21 E. Main St.) on Saturday, July 28, at 8 pm. Tickets are $28.50-$48.50 at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

When Pat DiNizio died in December 2017, fans, friends, and maybe even the band members themselves thought that was the end of the Smithereens after 35 great years. But in January, during a celebration of DiNizio’s life, Steven Van Zandt and others urged the band to find a way to keep going.

And now, the Smithereens have done it. They knew they could never replace their frontman, so they went out and found three exceptional stand-ins: Marshall Crenshaw, Ted Leo, and the Gin Blossoms’ Robin Wilson. The result? In a review of the June 1 show that featured Crenshaw on the mic, Goldmine said, “It almost defies logic that a veteran band that has existed since 1980 could put on such a blistering show. But their show in Montclair proved, once again, that The Smithereens still have a lot of gas left in their tank. They are still very much a must-see in concert.”

www.OfficialSmithereens.com

CALENDAR LISTING

CAPA presents THE SMITHEREENS FEATURING SPECIAL GUEST VOCALIST MARSHALL CRENSHAW

Saturday, July 28, 8 pm

Southern Theatre (21 E. Main St.)

Guest vocalist Marshall Crenshaw joins original members Jim Babjak, Mike Mesaros, and Dennis Diken to perform Smithereens favorites including “Blood and Roses” and “Behind the Wall of Sleep,” deep catalog numbers (“One Look at You” and “Can’t Go Home Anymore”), and great covers (the Beatles’ “When I Get Home” and the Outsiders’ “Time Won’t Let Me”). Tickets are $28.50-$48.50 at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.capa.com

The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, education excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. CAPA also appreciates the generous support of The National Endowment for the Arts, the Barbara B. Coons and Robert Bartels Funds of The Columbus Foundation, and the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

About CAPA

Owner/operator of downtown Columbus’ magnificent historic theatres (Ohio Theatre, Palace Theatre, Southern Theatre) and manager of the Riffe Center Theatre Complex, Lincoln Theatre, Drexel Theatre, Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts (New Albany, OH), and the Shubert Theater (New Haven, CT), CAPA is a non-profit, award-winning presenter of national and international performing arts and entertainment. For more information, visit www.capa.com.

The Mid-Ohio School Teams Up With Maria’s Message

LEXINGTON, Ohio (June 25, 2018) – The Mid-Ohio School takes its Honda Teen Defensive Driving Program curriculum and Honda Civic Skid Car on the road later this Saturday (June 30) to Columbus, Ohio, for a Maria’s Message Safe Driving Day.

On September 17, 2013, 10TV sports anchor Dom Tiberi and his family lost their 21-year-old daughter, Maria, in a distracted driving accident. Since then, the Tiberis and

their 10TV family have made it their mission to teach young drivers about the dangers of distracted driving and the affect it can have on their life. This mission includes public service announcements, Maria’s Message presentations at area high schools, and free defensive driving courses for teens.

“This year, as we observe the fifth anniversary of the distracted driving death of Maria Tiberi, we also mark year five of our partnership with The Mid-Ohio School in our Maria’s Message Safe Driving Days campaign,” said Angela Pace, 10TV’s Director of Community Affairs. “We’re convinced that these free defensive driving classes are making a difference. We hear back from parents and students about how effective the drills are. And they love the Mid-Ohio instructors … and so do I!”

Three sessions involving about 90 students who have pre-registered for class will be presented by The Mid-Ohio School on Saturday. The program will be at Thirty-One Gifts headquarters (3425 Morse Crossing, Columbus, OH 43219) for those interested in watching the training in progress. Additional classes are scheduled for Wednesday, July 25, and Saturday, August 25. To learn more about the future dates, please visit 10TV.com.

“We are proud to partner with WBNS-10TV, Dom and the Tiberi family for the fifth year in keeping Maria’s Message alive,” said Craig Rust, president of Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course and The Mid-Ohio School. “We hope to make a difference by raising awareness to the dangers of bad driving habits and reducing the amount of distracted driving that is happening. We know this partnership is saving lives of teenage drivers.”

This program teaches techniques not found in typical drivers’ education classrooms. Instructors from The Mid-Ohio School put students behind the wheel to learn skills they will use throughout their driving lives. Students will practice emergency lane change, wet pavement braking, and skid car drills.

In its 25th anniversary season of operation, The Mid-Ohio School has an official vehicle partnership with American Honda Motor Co., Inc. which makes up The Mid-Ohio School’s fleet of Acura ILXs, Honda Civics, and Honda S2000s. Two of the Honda Civics are also equipped with skid systems to practice car control techniques for oversteer and understeer situations often encountered in inclement weather conditions.

Additional sponsors of The Mid-Ohio School include Coca-Cola, Comfort Inn, Cooper Tires, Honda Performance Development, Malco, Sunoco, Quality Inn & Suites, Summit Racing, and Total Oil.

ABOUT THE MID-OHIO SCHOOL

Based at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, in Lexington, Ohio, The Mid-Ohio School provides professional driving and riding instruction to drivers and motorcyclists of all skill levels. The school’s 16 automobile courses include the renowned Honda Teen Defensive Driving program, as well as AcuraHigh Performance and Racing programs. The motorcycle side features two Performance Track Riding formats. Students enjoy classroom sessions, skill drills, expert private instruction and lapping on the same track that challenges the world’s top racers. The school is a past recipient of the prestigious Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Partners for Safety Award and partners with Maria’s Message each year to teach young drivers about the dangers of distracted driving. In 25 seasons, The Mid-Ohio School boasts 71,855 all-time graduates, including almost 21,300 teenage drivers and 18,012 motorcyclists.

For more information, visit midohioschool.com, ‘like’ its Facebook page @TheMidOhioSchool or follow updates on Twitter @MidOhioSchool.

Independence Day Travel to Hit New Record High

AAA Predicts Third Consecutive Year of Record Independence Day Travel

COLUMBUS, Ohio (June 21, 2018) – AAA expects Independence Day travel numbers to beat last year’s record, with 46.9 million Americans (2 million Ohioans) traveling at least 50 miles from home between Tuesday, July 3 and Sunday, July 8. This is an increase of more than 5 percent nationally (6 percent in Ohio) from last year.

Economy and Longer Holiday Period Boosting Travel:

“This Independence Day will be one for the record books, as more Americans take to the nation’s roads, skies, rails and waterways than ever before,” said Bill Sutherland, senior vice president, AAA Travel and Publishing. “Confident consumers with additional disposable income will look to spend on travel this holiday, building on an already busy summer travel season.”

In addition to strong economic variables, the slightly longer holiday period is helping boost travel this year. The six-day holiday period only occurs when the Fourth of July falls on a Wednesday. This gives travelers more flexibility to schedule a trip before or after the holiday.

Fourth of July is typically the busiest summer travel holiday, since school is out and many families take their big summer trip during this time.

Auto Travel:

Nearly 84 percent of American travelers (39.7 million people) and about 88 percent of Ohio travelers (nearly 1.8 million people) will drive to their destinations this Independence Day.

INRIX, a global transportation analytics company, predicts travel times in the most congested U.S. cities could be twice as long as the normal trip. The worst congestion will take place Tuesday in the late afternoon, as commuters leave work early and mix with holiday travelers.

During the six-day holiday period, AAA expects to assist more than 362,000 motorists with dead batteries, flat tires, lockouts and more. To avoid a breakdown this holiday, motorists should make sure their car is road trip ready. Oil changes, fluid level checks, battery tests and tire inspections go a long way toward reducing the chances of a breakdown.

Gas Prices Stabilizing:

Gas prices have slowly, but steadily, started to fall since the 2018 high of $2.97 set over the Memorial Day weekend. Although AAA expects the national gas price average to range between $2.85 and $3.05 through Labor Day, the prices seem to have little effect on holiday travelers.

According to a recent AAA survey, just 18 percent of travelers say they would consider adjusting their summer travel plans to travel closer to home with gas prices at $2.75, while 33 percent said they would adjust their plans at $3 a gallon.

Air Travel:

A record-breaking 3.8 million Americans will travel by air, a 7.9 percent increase and the ninth consecutive year of air travel growth. In Ohio, nearly 88,000 people plan to fly, a 5 percent increase and the fifth consecutive year of air travel growth.

According to AAA’s Leisure Travel Index, average airfares for the top 40 domestic flight routes will cost 9 percent less this Independence Day, with a round trip ticket averaging $171.

Other Travel Expenses:

Travelers can expect to pay more to rent a car and stay at mid-range hotels this Independence Day. Daily car rental rates have risen 2 percent to an average $66 per day. The average nightly rate at AAA Two Diamond hotels is up 11 percent to $147, while AAA Three Diamond hotel rates are up 2 percent to an average of $187 per night.

Holiday Forecast Methodology:

AAA’s projections are based on economic forecasting and research by IHS Markit. The London-based business information provider teamed with AAA in 2009 to jointly analyze travel trends during the major holidays. AAA has been reporting on holiday travel trends for more than two decades. The complete AAA/IHS Markit 2018 Independence Day Holiday Travel Forecast can be found at Newsroom.AAA.com.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 58 million members with travel-, insurance-, financial- and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited online at AAA.com.

A member of the clergy is taken away in handcuffs after being arrested protesting in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. A group of 17 protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the ICE facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120866304-f77a5a733ac3429b83a0df3b05366d0c.jpgA member of the clergy is taken away in handcuffs after being arrested protesting in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. A group of 17 protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the ICE facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

A protester is taken away in cuffs after being arrested in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. A group of protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120866304-98dc9530d8a949438a981eb8a5cd9094.jpgA protester is taken away in cuffs after being arrested in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. A group of protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

Protesters are processed after being arrested in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. Protesters who were blocking the entrance to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles have been led away in handcuffs. A group of protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/07/web1_120866304-1c06911e24f747f085d4d6377e64f2e2.jpgProtesters are processed after being arrested in downtown Los Angeles on Monday, July 2, 2018. Protesters who were blocking the entrance to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in downtown Los Angeles have been led away in handcuffs. A group of protesters sat down in the street, blocking the entrance to the facility Monday morning. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

Staff & Wire Reports