House speaker square-off


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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)


House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives to face reporters at a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)


Pelosi claims she has votes, but race for speaker goes on

By LISA MASCARO and KEVIN FREKING

Associated Press

Saturday, November 17

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats won the majority. Now they just need a speaker of the House.

The standoff over Nancy Pelosi’s bid to regain the gavel intensified as Democrats left Washington for the Thanksgiving break in what has turned out to be an unsettling finish to an otherwise triumphant week that saw them welcome a historic class of newcomers to Capitol Hill and prepare to take control from Republicans.

Pelosi, speaker from 2007 to 2011 and the first woman to hold that job, was certain she will hold it again. Her foes were equally confident they have the votes to stop her ascension. And now President Donald Trump is getting into the fray, offering Saturday to provide Republican votes for Pelosi’s candidacy even though the GOP has long used the California Democrat as an election target.

For now, it’s a band of disgruntled Democrats, led mostly by men, in the forefront of the opposition. With a test vote looming in late November, and at least one potential Pelosi challenger stepping forward, Democrats are facing the uncomfortable prospect of the internal squabble that the speaker’s vote Jan. 3 could drag on for weeks.

“I think chaos is good if it’s productive. I think chaos is bad if it is too disruptive and it divides us too much,” said Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., a co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, whose leaders were upbeat after meeting with Pelosi this past week.

“We don’t have a lot of time,” Jayapal said. “We need to put forward the vision of who we are as a party and what we’re fighting for and so that needs to happen very, very quickly.”

Pelosi was expected to work the phones from California after meeting privately Friday with newly elected Democrats who could be crucial to her bid.

Those incoming lawmakers indicated they were having good meetings with the leader, though few said the talks had changed their minds.

Rep.-elect Abigail Spanberger of Virginia said she had a “wonderful conversation” about her district’s priorities, but “will not be voting” for Pelosi.

“It isn’t about her, it’s about wanting new leadership,” said Spanberger, a former CIA operative who defeated tea party Republican Rep. Dave Brat in suburban Richmond. “There isn’t anything she could say, because the decision isn’t about her.”

Rep.-elect Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey said he had a “pleasant” meeting, but remains a “no” on Pelosi. He is among 17 Democrats who have signed on to a letter opposing her. Van Drew said they discussed his districts and which committees he’d like to serve on. “I don’t feel under pressure,” he said.

Pelosi also met for 45 minutes with Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, a potential rival for the speakership who said the two had “a very open and frank discussion,” including about “the feeling in the caucus of people who are feeling left out and left behind.”

Fudge said she would probably decide after Thanksgiving break whether she will run.

“To her credit, she wanted to know what my concerns were,” Fudge said. “What she asked me was, basically, how we could get to a point where I’m supportive.”

One question for some Democrats is what, exactly, Pelosi means when she says she intends to be a transitional leader, a bridge to a new generation. She has led the party for 15 years.

“We talked about some succession planning,” Fudge said. “I think it is something our caucus is interested in knowing.”

If it were up to most of the Democratic Party, Pelosi easily would win. They see her as a skilled and tested leader prepared to confront Trump and deliver on priorities.

Pelosi, 78, first became speaker after Democrats took control of the House in midterm elections during former President George W. Bush’s second term. With President Barack Obama, she was pivotal in passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010.

She appears to be winning the outside game in her bid, amassing endorsements from a who’s who of the nation’s Democrats. Inside the Capitol she has support from influential lawmakers such as Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, and backing from some of the incoming House members.

The internal debate is spilling out nationally, especially on social media, where Democratic activists are publicly criticizing Democratic Reps. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts and Tim Ryan of Ohio and others leading the campaign to oust Pelosi.

It’s not lost on supporters that a group made up of mostly men is leading the effort. On the list of 17 names who’ve signed onto a letter against her, just three are women.

With a narrow Democratic majority, now at 231 seats in the 435-member House, Pelosi does not have much cushion to secure the 218 votes needed, assuming all Republicans vote against her, as expected. Some House races remain undecided and the Democratic majority could grow slightly.

There is a chance the math could shift in Pelosi’s favor if lawmakers are absent or simply vote “present,” meaning she would need fewer than 218 votes for an absolute majority.

Trump, trying to insert himself into the race, tweeted on Saturday that he could get Pelosi “as many votes as she wants” to become speaker. “She deserves this victory, she has earned it – but there are those in her party who are trying to take it away. She will win!”

Trump included the twitter link for Rep. Tom Reed, a New York Republican who has said he could be open to backing Pelosi if she committed to changes that would shift some power from the House leadership.

Trump’s latest postelection praise of Pelosi raises questions about his sincerity, given the Republicans’ election playbook of trying to tie Democrats in competitive congressional districts to Pelosi every chance they can. GOP lawmakers considering endorsing Pelosi would open themselves up to a potential primary challenges in 2020 for daring to support someone their base has reviled.

Associated Press writers Alan Fram, Matthew Daly and Mary Clare Jalonick contributed to this report.

Follow on Twitter at https://twitter.com/lisamascaro and https://twitter.com/AP_Politics

Ohio State University trustees deliver President Drake’s performance review

Ohio State News

Nov. 16, 2018

Board also hears from former students who report experiences of sexual misconduct by Richard Strauss

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio State University Board of Trustees today considered a full agenda of university business.

Among the items, the board delivered President Michael V. Drake’s performance review, noting the considerable attention he has devoted to execution of the Time and Change strategic plan while managing diverse operations of the university.

“Your commitment to institutional excellence and your passion for promoting a high-quality, affordable education is commendable,” Board Chair Michael Gasser and Hiroyuki Fujita, chair of the board’s Talent and Compensation Committee, wrote in his letter of review. “Your contributions to the advancement of the pillars of our Time and Change strategic plan are significant and define the standards for a flagship public research university in the 21st century.”

Drake was awarded a salary increase of $21,225 (2.5 percent), bringing his base salary to $870,191.40, and the maximum allowable performance award of $212,242, or 25 percent of his base salary.

The board also heard from seven former students who report they experienced sexual misconduct by former Ohio State physician Dr. Richard Strauss, who worked at the university from 1978-1998 and died in 2005.

Athletic ticket prices and fees approved

The board approved football ticket and golf prices for 2019.

• For football: The schedule for the 2019 season offers Florida Atlantic and Miami (Ohio) games in the lowest pricing tier, for $60 and $65, respectively; and Penn State and Wisconsin in the highest pricing tier, at $198 and $170, respectively, per ticket. Overall, season tickets for members of the public will cost $63 more than they did for the current season, and $58 more in total season ticket prices. The current student ticket price of $34 per game will continue at least through the 2020 season.

• For golf: For the 2019 calendar year, alumni, faculty/staff and affiliate membership dues will increase by 2.5 percent, student membership dues increase by 2.1 percent and a $1,000 initiation fee for new members will be reinstated.

The Department of Athletics continues to be one of only 24 self‐sustaining athletic programs in the nation. The department funds scholarships for more than 1,100 student‐athletes.

Investment strategy affirmed

The board affirmed the university’s investment strategy and declined to approve a proposal from Undergraduate Student Government (USG) to divest the university’s Long-Term Investment Pool from fossil fuel companies.

The Office of Business and Finance conducted a study of the USG proposal and potential financial impact on the university’s investment portfolio. The review identified risks associated with the USG divestment proposal that could impair the performance of the investment portfolio and thereby reduce the annual funding available for student scholarships, faculty positions and other academic priorities.

Construction contracts approved

The board authorized the university to enter into professional services and construction contracts for the following projects:

• Review and update the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences master plan. The project would develop a master plan to guide the development of 2.4 million square feet of facilities and more than 10,000 acres of land across the state of Ohio. Trustees approved professional services contracts of $700,000 to be paid with university funds.

• Instructional science buildings deferred maintenance. The project will renew mechanical, electrical and plumbing services in Mendenhall Laboratory and Bolz, Howlett and Parks halls. Trustees approved professional services contracts of $2 million. Total project budget is $25 million to be paid with university debt.

• Wexner Medical Center West Campus ambulatory facilities. The project will construct a new ambulatory facility at Kenny and Carmack roads that will include outpatient operating rooms, an endoscopy unit, an urgent care, a pre-anesthesia center, an outpatient diagnostic imaging center, and patient and building support spaces. The board approved professional services contracts through the design and development stage of $23 million to be paid with auxiliary funds.

• Lincoln Tower 11th and 13th floor office renovations. The project will renovate the 11th and 13th floors for Wexner Medical Center faculty and staff offices. Trustees approved professional services and construction contracts of $5 million to be paid with auxiliary funds.

• Ohio Union infrastructure upgrades. The board approved infrastructure upgrades to the Ohio Union to support high use rates and promote the longevity of the building. Trustees approved professional services and construction contracts of $5.3 million to be paid with auxiliary funds.

• Wexner Medical Center inpatient hospital garage – infrastructure and road work. The project will construct a 1,870-space parking garage west of McCampbell Hall, provide adjacent site utilities and construct a street to connect 10th Avenue with Medical Center Drive and King Avenue. Trustees approved a $500,000 increase in professional services contracts ($6.1 million was approved in Feb. 2018) and construction contracts of $21.5 million to be paid with university debt and auxiliary funds.

• Health Sciences faculty office and Optometry Clinic building. The project will demolish three existing buildings at the corner of West 11th and Neil avenues and construct approximately 106,000 square feet for optometry clinics, retail, faculty offices and support spaces. Trustees approved a $1.3 million increase in professional services contracts and a $6.3 million increase in construction contracts (the project scope was increased for a basement and an additional floor). Total project budget is $35.9 million to be paid with university and auxiliary funds.

• Interdisciplinary Health Sciences Center (Anatomy Lab). The project includes renovating existing facilities and constructing a new building to create a collaborative campus for interprofessional education throughout the health sciences. Anatomy lab work includes renovating 18,000 square feet in Hamilton Hall and installing a chiller, boiler and generator. Trustees approved $4.4 million in construction contracts to be paid with state funds.

New degree established

The board approved the establishment of a master of dietetics and nutrition degree program in the College of Medicine and the College of Education and Human Ecology.

The new degree responds to new accreditation standards that will require graduate-level education for the registered dietitian nutritionist.

Currently, both the College of Medicine and the College of Education and Human Ecology offer dietetics programs. The new degree provides a unified program between the two units, eliminating internal competition for resources and public confusion regarding dietetics education at the university.

Property purchase approved

The board authorized the purchase of the former MLK Columbus Metropolitan Library at 1600 E. Long St. for $245,000 from the Columbus Metropolitan Library Board of Trustees. The purchase is part of the Wexner Medical Center strategic initiative for healthy communities. The facility is near University Hospitals East and Carepoint East and the medical center plans to renovate the space to serve as a community center that will include a demonstration kitchen, café and meeting rooms.

Lease approved

Trustees authorized the leasing of approximately two-three acres of land at the OSU Airport to Worthington Industries for development of an airplane hangar.

Personnel actions approved

The board approved the following personnel appointments and reappointments:

• Nick Brunelli has been appointed assistant professor and holder of the H.C. “Slip” Slider Professorship in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in the College of Engineering effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 30, 2023

• Darrick Hamilton has been named executive director of the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity effective Jan. 1, 2019 through Dec. 31, 2023

• Jeff M.S. Kaplan has been named secretary and senior adviser to the Board of Trustees effective Aug. 1, 2018

• Gil Latz has been named vice provost for global strategies and international affairs in the Office of Academic Affairs effective Jan. 1, 2019 through Dec. 31, 2023

• Robert Lee has been named professor and holder of the Charles H. Kimberly Professorship in Pharmacy in the College of Pharmacy effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2021

• Eugene Oltz has been named professor and holder of the Samuel Saslaw Professorship in Infectious Diseases and chair of the Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity in the College of Medicine effective Jan. 1, 2019 through Dec. 31, 2023

• Lawrence “Drew” Shirley has been named assistant professor and holder of the Ward Family Surgical Oncology Designated Professorship in the College of Medicine effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2022

• Henry W. Fields has been reappointed professor and holder of the Vig/Williams Endowed Chair in Orthodontics in the College of Dentistry effective Oct. 1, 2018 through Sept. 30, 2023

• Giorgio Rizzoni has been reappointed professor and holder of the Ford Motor Company Chair in Electromechanical Systems in the College of Engineering effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2023

Autumn degrees and certificates approved

Trustees approved the degrees and certificates to be conferred at autumn commencement ceremonies on Dec. 16, 2018, to students who have completed the requirements for their respective degrees and certificates.

In addition, the board approved awarding three degrees posthumously: William Miller, bachelor of arts; Sangin Shin, master of arts in educational studies; and

William Wickes, bachelor of science in hospitality management.

The board also approved awarding Quincy Guttman the bachelor of science degree effective spring semester 2017.

Distinguished Service Awards approved

Trustees approved the university’s Distinguished Service Award recipients, who will receive their award at autumn 2018 commencement. They are:

• Deborah Ballam

• Valerie Lee

Honorary degree approved

Trustees approved awarding the honorary Doctor of Science to Lora Stilke.

Ohio Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency recommendations approved

The board approved the university’s annual response to the recommendations of the Ohio Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency, which was appointed by Gov. Kasich in 2015. The task force developed 10 categories of recommendations to make Ohio’s institutions of higher education more efficient.

Ohio State’s strategic plan is strongly aligned with the task force recommendations. The university’s progress report reflects Ohio State’s commitment to access, affordability and excellence.

Through fiscal year 2018, the university has generated more than $112 million in savings, including $54.5 million in efficiency savings. Since 2015, Ohio State has committed more than $100 million in additional student financial aid, using efficiency savings and new resources. More than 32,000 Buckeyes will benefit from these affordability programs through 2020. Initiatives include the Buckeye Opportunity Program, Digital Flagship, additional financial aid, the Ohio State Tuition Guarantee, fee simplification and savings, and summer tuition discount.

State legislation requires each institution’s board of trustees to complete an efficiency review based on the task force recommendations and submit it to the chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education annually.

Annual audit statement submission approved

Trustees accepted the draft audited consolidated university financial statements and approved submission to the state auditor for review and approval. The university seeks an independent audit annually and currently engages PricewaterhouseCoopers LLC to audit its consolidated financial statements. The result of the audit was an unqualified opinion. The audit will be final when approved by the state auditor.

Joint use agreement approved

The board authorized the university to enter into a 20-year joint use agreement with the City of Dublin for the purchase of equipment to expand the deployment of smart city technology there.

Ohio State, on behalf of the Ohio Academic Resources Network (OARnet), was allocated $150,000 in the 2019 state capital bill designed for use by the Dublin Smart Community Connect Project. The Ohio Department of Higher Education Board requires a joint use agreement before state funding can be released to Dublin.

Foundation report approved

The board approved The Ohio State University Foundation report as of Sept. 30, 2018, which includes the establishment of the Scott and Lee Family International Scholarship Fund (part of The Joseph A. Alutto Graduate Global Leadership Initiative) and 20 additional named endowed funds providing $7.8 million in private support to the university.

Leadership institute named

The board approved the naming of the Eugene D. Smith Leadership Institute in the Department of Athletics in recognition of significant contributions of the Walter family to the Department of Athletics.

Secrest internal spaces named

The board approved the naming of internal spaces at the Secrest Welcome and Education Center in recognition of donors who provided significant contributions to construct the center at Secrest Arboretum and Gardens:

• Nationwide Orientation Space

• Ralph R. & Grace B. Jones Foundation Gallery

• Rory and Dedee O’Neil Executive Office

• Buehler Family Office

• David and Carol Briggs Media Room

• Michael and Stephanie Reardon Kitchen

Parks Hall internal spaces named

The board approved the naming of internal spaces at Parks Hall in recognition of donors who have provided significant contributions to the College of Pharmacy:

• Room 233, Health Care Logistics, Inc. and the Gary and Connie Sharpe Family Pharmacy Skills Laboratory

• Room 245A, The Meijer Foundation Pharmacy Skills Classroom

• Room 246, Dr. Mark and Linda Sirgo, Class of 1977 Counseling Suite

• Room 245, Ric Mora BS ’63 Pharmacy Simulation Classroom

Board of Trustees committee appointments approved

The board approved the appointment of members to the following committees for 2018-19:

Academic Affairs and Student Life Committee:

Clark C. Kellogg, Chair

Cheryl L. Krueger, Vice Chair

Abigail S. Wexner

Hiroyuki Fujita

Alan A. Stockmeister

Janice M. Bonsu

Alan VanderMolen

Janet Porter

Richard K. Herrmann (faculty member)

Michael J. Gasser (ex officio)

Finance Committee:

Timothy P. Smucker, Chair

Brent R. Porteus, Vice Chair

Alex Shumate

Erin P. Hoeflinger

Alexander R. Fischer

John W. Zeiger

Lewis Von Thaer

H. Jordan Moseley

James D. Klingbeil

Lawrence A. Hilsheimer

Michael J. Gasser (ex officio)

Advancement Committee:

Erin P. Hoeflinger, Chair

Alan A. Stockmeister, Vice Chair

Clark C. Kellogg

Alex Shumate

Cheryl L. Krueger

Abigail S. Wexner

H. Jordan Moseley

Alan VanderMolen

Janet Porter

Nancy Kramer

Craig S. Bahner

Kristin L. Watt (Alumni Association member)

Catherine Baumgardner (Alumni Association member)

James F. Dietz (Foundation Board member)

Gifford Weary (Foundation Board member)

Michael J. Gasser (ex officio)

Audit and Compliance Committee:

John W. Zeiger, Chair

Timothy P. Smucker, Vice Chair

Brent R. Porteus

Hiroyuki Fujita

Lewis Von Thaer

Janice M. Bonsu

James D. Klingbeil

Amy Chronis

Craig S. Morford

Michael J. Gasser (ex officio)

Governance Committee:

Alex Shumate, Chair

Janet Porter, Vice Chair

Timothy P. Smucker

Erin P. Hoeflinger

Alexander R. Fischer

Hiroyuki Fujita

H. Jordan Moseley

Alan VanderMolen

Michael J. Gasser (ex officio)

Talent and Compensation Committee:

Hiroyuki Fujita, Chair

Alex Shumate, Vice Chair

Clark C. Kellogg

Erin P. Hoeflinger

John W. Zeiger

Lewis Von Thaer

H. Jordan Moseley

Janet Porter

Michael J. Gasser (ex officio)

Master Planning and Facilities Committee:

Alexander R. Fischer, Chair

James D. Klingbeil, Vice Chair

Timothy P. Smucker

Brent R. Porteus

Alan A. Stockmeister

Janice M. Bonsu

Robert H. Schottenstein

Michael J. Gasser (ex officio)

Resolutions in memoriam adopted

The board adopted resolutions in memoriam for the following persons:

• Frank F. Gibson, former chair of finance and professor emeritus of business law, who died on Oct. 6, 2018

• Martin D. Keller, professor emeritus in the College of Public Health, who died on Sept. 27, 2018

• Calvin “Cal” D. Knight, professor emeritus of extension in the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, who died on Aug. 24, 2018

Retirement plans amended

The board authorized the restatement of the pre-approved Alternative Retirement Plan, formerly referred to as the Ohio Public Higher Education Institutions’ Alternative Retirement Plan.

Faculty rules amended

Trustees approved amendments to the Rules of the University Faculty regarding clinical faculty appointments and emeritus faculty.

Investment benchmark modified

Trustees approved modification of the benchmark used to gauge investment performance of the Global Equities asset class within the Long-Term Investment Pool from the MSCI All Country World Index (MSCI ACWI) gross dividends index to MSCI ACWI net dividends index.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121796621-cd785af0f0aa4658b2278a97364b71db.jpgHouse Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives to face reporters at a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121796621-0e1bbfe928fd48669eca23d165182e2f.jpgHouse Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives to face reporters at a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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