Sherrod Brown starts tour


OHIO NEWS

Staff & Wire Reports



Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, meets with supporters after speaking at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, meets with supporters after speaking at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)


Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)


Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)


Ohio Democrat Brown begins tour ahead of 2020 decision

By JULIE CARR SMYTH

Associated Press

Wednesday, January 30

BRUNSWICK, Ohio (AP) — Sen. Sherrod Brown on Wednesday kicked off his tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary by accusing Republican President Donald Trump of “phony populism” that disrespects minorities, workers and families while benefiting billionaires.

The Ohio Democrat launched his “dignity of work” tour at a warehouse south of Cleveland. He and his wife, journalist Connie Schultz, head next to Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.

The 66-year-old senator and former representative told the crowd of several hundred that Democrats can’t let “extremists” at statehouses and in Washington claim populist credentials if they don’t support policies that benefit middle-class Americans.

“When work has dignity, we honor the pensions people earned,” Brown said. “When work has dignity, everyone can afford health care, education and housing. They have power over their schedules and the economic security to start a family, pay for daycare and college, take time off to care for themselves or their families when they’re sick, and save for retirement.”

Steve Norris, 38, a software developer from Lakewood, said he would love to see better benefits and wages for workers his age, something Brown said he would fight for.

“You talk to some of the older people, and it would be great to get some of the deals they had,” he said.

Christopher Mobley, 18, said the College Democrats at the University of Akron, of which he’s a part, are excited to support Brown “because he’s someone that’s not going to take anything from Trump.”

Brown accused Trump of betraying workers, claiming the president “has not lifted a finger” to help threatened workers at General Motors’ Lordstown plant.

“Donald Trump has used his phony populism to divide Americans and to demonize immigrants. He uses phony populism to distract from the fact that he’s used the White House to enrich billionaires like himself,” Brown said. “Because real populism is not racist; real populism is not anti-Semitic; real populists don’t engage in hate speech and don’t rip babies from families at the border.”

The fight for the populist label is no small thing to Brown, who will argue in the four other states that his decisive re-election in November showed the power a progressive message can have in a state that Trump won by double digits. Supporters at the event recalled fighting for workers and families for decades.

“Sherrod is the one candidate who’s like an old-school Democrat, that hasn’t forgotten where the Democratic Party started,” said Teamster Fred Crow, 57, of Maple Heights. “Sherrod’s the one guy that’s been with us from the beginning.”

Many working-class supporters in attendance said they felt betrayed or duped by Trump, who won Ohio decisively in 2016 with the support of many blue-collar workers who switched parties to give him their vote.

“He hornswoggled us,” said Albert Stapleton, 73, a retired Teamster and 2016 Trump voter from Brunswick. “He went 180 (degrees) out on everything that he campaigned on.”

Crow said: “Mr. Trump is the drunk at the end of the bar. He’s going to tell you what you want to hear.”

Rather than disappearing after the rally, Brown and Schultz remained for nearly an hour mingling and taking photos with backers.

PUCO Nominating Council makes recommendations to Gov. DeWine

COLUMBUS, OHIO (Jan. 31, 2019) – The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) Nominating Council today submitted the names of four finalists to be considered by Gov. Mike DeWine for the position of commissioner of the PUCO to fill a five-year term commencing on April 11, 2019. After considering many highly qualified applicants, the Nominating Council recommended the following individuals:

Bryce McKenney

Dennis Deters

Eugene Krebs

Samuel Randazzo

The PUCO Nominating Council is a broad-based 12-member panel charged with screening candidates for the position of commissioner. For additional information about the PUCO commissioner appointment process visit www.PUCO.ohio.gov.

PUCO approves Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio parent merger

COLUMBUS, OHIO (Jan. 30, 2019) – Today the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) approved Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio’s notice of its parent company merger.

In its order, the Commission attached several conditions to ensure that Vectren customers will not pay for any of the transaction costs related to the merger. The Commission also stated Vectren should continue to maintain its investment plans in Ohio.

On June 15, 2018, Vectren filed a notice of parent company merger regarding the proposed merger of its parent company, Vectren Corporation, and CenterPoint Energy, Inc.

A copy of today’s finding and order is available on the PUCO website at www.PUCO.ohio.gov by clicking on the link to Docketing Information System (DIS) and searching for case 18-1027-GA-UNC.

PUCO accepts results of FirstEnergy auction

COLUMBUS, OHIO (Jan. 30, 2019) – The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) today accepted the results of FirstEnergy’s wholesale auction that will ultimately determine its default retail generation rates through May 2020.

The auction, held on Jan. 28, 2019, secured a one-year product to supply electricity to FirstEnergy’s Ohio utility customers.

The auction resulted in three winning bidders and an average clearing price of $47.92 per megawatt hour (MWh) for the delivery period of June 2019 through May 2020.

The results will be blended with previous auctions to help determine the price-to-compare for FirstEnergy’s Ohio customers during the delivery period.

CRA International served as the independent auction manager, and Bates White Economic Consulting, a consultant retained by the PUCO, monitored the auction process. The names of the winning bidders will remain confidential for 21 days.

Customers continue to have the opportunity to consider competitive options to meet their electricity needs, including shopping for an alternate supplier or joining a local government aggregation group. More information about how to choose a supplier is available at www.energychoice.ohio.gov. The PUCO’s Apples to Apples comparison charts provide customers with a snapshot comparison of current electric supplier offers and contract terms. The charts are updated daily.

Additional information regarding the auction format is available at bidding manager’s website www.firstenergycbp.com.

A copy of today’s Commission finding and order and redacted version of the report issued by the auction manager are available at www.PUCO.ohio.gov. Click on the link to Docketing Information System and enter the case number 16-776-EL-UNC.

PUCO accepts results of Columbia Gas of Ohio’s natural gas supply auction

COLUMBUS, OHIO (Jan. 30, 2019) – The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) today accepted the results of Columbia Gas of Ohio’s auction for its standard choice offer (SCO). The auction secured natural gas supplies for Columbia’s SCO customers for the period April 1, 2019 through March 31, 2020 and established a retail price adjustment of $0.118 per hundred cubic feet (ccf), a decrease of $0.005 from the existing price adjustment.

Columbia’s SCO rate changes monthly and is calculated as the sum of the retail price adjustment, plus the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) month-end settlement price. The price adjustment reflects the winning bidders’ estimate of their cost to deliver natural gas from the production area to Columbia’s service area.

The SCO will apply to Columbia’s choice-eligible customers that have not selected an alternative supplier. Choice-eligible customers will continue to have the option to enroll with an energy choice supplier of their choosing, join a government aggregation group or remain on the SCO. Customers who are interested in choosing an energy choice supplier can compare rate offers using the PUCO’s Energy Choice Ohio Apples to Apples comparison charts at www.energychoice.ohio.gov.

Each SCO customer’s bill will indicate the certified retail natural gas supplier that is responsible for providing the customer’s natural gas. Columbia will continue to deliver natural gas to all customers, offer payment plans, and handle all emergency and customer service calls. Government aggregation group customers and those already enrolled with an energy choice supplier are not affected.

On Jan. 29, 2019, Enel X, Columbia’s auction manager, conducted a descending clock auction for the SCO rate. Bids were submitted by 11 natural gas suppliers based on fixed adjustments to the NYMEX settlement price. The names of the six winning bidders will remain confidential for 15 days to protect the suppliers’ positions in contract negotiations with pipeline companies.

A copy of today’s Commission finding and order is available at www.PUCO.ohio.gov. Click on the link to Docketing Information System and enter 19-121-GA-UNC in the search box.

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) is the sole agency charged with regulating public utility service. The role of the PUCO is to assure all residential, business and industrial consumers have access to adequate, safe and reliable utility services at fair prices while facilitating an environment that provides competitive choices. Consumers with utility-related questions or concerns can call the PUCO Call Center at (800) 686-PUCO (7826) and speak with a representative.

‘JUST ONE STEP’

OWU Theatre & Dance, Music Departments to Stage Twin Bill of Short Comic Plays, Contemporary Songs

DELAWARE, Ohio – Ohio Wesleyan University’s Departments of Theatre & Dance and Music will take to the stage Feb. 21-24 with “Just One Step,” a twin bill of short comedies by American playwright David Ives and music by American composer and lyricist Jason Robert Brown.

Both portions of the show feature material that explores people on the verge of big decisions or actions in their lives.

“Just One Step” opens Thursday, Feb. 21 and runs through Saturday, Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. and concludes Sunday, Feb. 24 at 2 p.m. All performances take place in the Studio Theatre inside Ohio Wesleyan’s Chappelear Drama Center, 45 Rowland Ave., Delaware.

The production is supervised and the plays are directed by OWU theatre professor D. Glen Vanderbilt Jr., who also provides scene design. OWU alumna Zoe Crankshaw, Class of 2015, is serving as lighting designer, and costume shop manager Jacqueline Shelley is creating the costumes. Theatre major Logan Kovach, Class of 2021, is serving as stage manager for both acts.

The cast for the plays is OWU students Catherine Giacalone, Ares Harper, Max Haupt, Caitlin Hyatt, Rose Jonesco, Jasmine Lew, Josh Martin, Jack Riter, Michael Sutton, Hannah Wargo, and Margaret Welsh.

For Ives’ plays, the point of view is consistently comic, yet wistful, Vanderbilt says.

In “Sure Thing,” a couple meet in a café for the first time and keep experiencing déjà vu on their way to agreeing to a second get-together. “Philip Glass Buys a Loaf of Bread” is a surreal vignette about the American composer having an existential crisis in a bakery. In “Time Flies,” two lonely mayflies meet, are attracted to each other, and realize they don’t have much time before making a big decision. And, finally, “Degas, C’est Moi” is a whimsical day-in-the-life of an urban everyman who makes some key realizations about his life and art.

The music portion of the show produced by the Department of Music’s Opera Workshop features selections from composer Brown’s song-cycle “Songs for a New World.” It is directed by OWU music professor Jennifer Whitehead with musical preparation by professor Jason Hiester. Brown’s work explores the “Just One Step” theme from multiple points of view with the ensemble cast.

What do Christopher Columbus, a suicidal socialite, and Santa’s wife have in common? They are a few of the characters in “Songs for A New World,” which features not one story but many.

Brown’s “New World” is a revue of varied and memorable solos and ensembles, each telling its own narrative, and featuring characters and situations connected by one universal theme – the reality, fear, and exhilaration of decision-making. Brown’s characters are as real and sympathetic as his music is poignant and memorable, Whitehead says, and the audience is invited to jump into the passenger seat for their journeys, and learn about themselves on the ride.

The cast for the song cycle is OWU students Ares Harper, Miko Harper, Rose Jonesco, Jasmine Lew, Josh Martin, Jack Riter, Jasmine Spitzer, Hannah Wargo, and Austin Wood.

General admission for “Just One Step” and all Ohio Wesleyan Theatre & Dance productions is $10. Admission for senior citizens, OWU faculty/staff, and non-OWU students is $5. Admission is free for Ohio Wesleyan students with a valid university I.D. Admission on Feb. 22 is free for all OWU employees. Reservations are encouraged and, because of the limited, intimate seating, latecomers may not be able to be seated until a suitable break in the action. Please note, this production includes some contemporary language and is not recommended for young audiences.

Call (740) 368-3855 for reservations or visit http://theatre.owu.edu/ for more details.

Founded in 1842, Ohio Wesleyan University is one of the nation’s premier liberal arts universities. Located in Delaware, Ohio, the private university offers more than 90 undergraduate majors and competes in 25 NCAA Division III varsity sports. Through Ohio Wesleyan’s signature OWU Connection program, students integrate knowledge across disciplines, build a diverse and global perspective, and apply their knowledge in real-world settings. Ohio Wesleyan is featured in the book “Colleges That Change Lives” and included in the U.S. News & World Report and Princeton Review “best colleges” lists. Learn more at www.owu.edu.

Irish Folk Music Legends

The High Kings

Return to the Lincoln March 8

The true heirs of Ireland’s folk heritage, The High Kings are internationally acclaimed singers and instrumentalists with a unique brand of high-octane balladry and folk that has won them numerous accolades. Their 10th anniversary album, Decade: Best of The High Kings (2017), received rave reviews and record sales figures with the band again topping the Irish album charts and returning to the Billboard world music charts. With the departure of original member Martin Furey and the arrival of young gun George Murphy, The Decade World Tour promises a joyous trip down memory lane performed in a contemporary style and arrangement which still remains true to the original.

CAPA presents The High Kings at the Lincoln Theatre (769 E. Long St.) on Friday, March 8, at 8 pm. Tickets are $36.50 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

Almost 10 years ago, four Irish singers, performers, and songwriters decided to take a calculated risk. Finbarr Clancy, Brian Dunphy, Martin Furey, and Darren Holden each had a wealth of history in the music business but knew that in order to maintain any level of creative interest they would have to boldly go where no other Irish ballad group had gone before.

Within months, the four had clicked as a creative unit as well as friends. The self-titled debut album, released in 2008, reached an impressive number two on Billboard’s World Music chart. However, it was during The High Kings second US tour in 2011 (having graduated from playing small venues to larger halls as they promoted their follow-up album, Memory Lane, which also crashed into Billboard’s World Music chart), that everyone involved realised the fanbase was growing into something that no one had predicted.

Subsequently, the group’s tour of Ireland sold out within hours. The High Kings had achieved what many thought impossible—they were moving the Irish ballad tradition into the here and now, carrying along with them the steadfast older fans while simultaneously bringing it to a new audience.

In 2013, The High Kings stepped out of the shadows with their third studio album, Friends for Life, taking the original song writing route and showcasing their own songwriting talents.

The development of original songwriting – ballad-style but with contemporary touches – from each member of The High Kings continues apace, but balance must be maintained. To a degree, expectations have to be met while still moving specific creative elements forward, which is why the group’s fourth studio album, Grace & Glory, took them back to the essentials that kick-started their career in the first place.

2017 saw the band continue with intensive touring of Ireland, the UK, and US in tandem with a rapid growth in their digital and online profile. It is also the year that the band reached its 10th anniversary, marking it with a very special compilation celebrating a decade of outstanding songs and performances. The departure of original High King Martin Furey and the arrival of young-gun George Murphy has brought a new hunger to the High Kings and their audiences. The November 2017 release of Decade: Best of the High Kings was received with rave reviews and record sales figures as the band again topped the Irish album charts and returned to the Billboard World Music Charts once again.

To say The High Kings are charting a new course for Irish ballad music – equal parts rousing and reflective, energetic and insightful – is an understatement. They are essentially marking out a bright, new era for Irish folk music, and aiming to bring a broad demographic along.

www.TheHighKings.com

CALENDAR LISTING

CAPA presents THE HIGH KINGS

Friday, March 8, 8 pm

Lincoln Theatre (769 E. Long St.)

The true heirs of Ireland’s folk heritage, The High Kings are internationally acclaimed singers and instrumentalists with a unique brand of high-octane balladry and folk that has won them numerous accolades. Their 10th anniversary album, Decade: Best of The High Kings (2017), received rave reviews and record sales figures with the band again topping the Irish album charts and returning to the Billboard world music charts. With the departure of original member Martin Furey and the arrival of young gun George Murphy, The Decade World Tour promises a joyous trip down memory lane performed in a contemporary style and arrangement which still remains true to the original. Tickets are $36.50 and can be purchased in-person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.capa.com

The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, education excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. CAPA also appreciates the generous support of the Barbara B. Coons and Robert Bartels Funds of The Columbus Foundation and the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

About CAPA

Owner/operator of downtown Columbus’ magnificent historic theatres (Ohio Theatre, Palace Theatre, Southern Theatre) and manager of the Riffe Center Theatre Complex, Lincoln Theatre, Drexel Theatre, Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts (New Albany, OH), and the Shubert Theater (New Haven, CT), CAPA is a non-profit, award-winning presenter of national and international performing arts and entertainment. For more information, visit www.capa.com.

The “stuff” of the universe keeps changing

Review discusses how stable elements came from the lives and deaths of stars

COLUMBUS, Ohio—The composition of the universe—the elements that are the building blocks for every bit of matter—is ever-changing and ever-evolving, thanks to the lives and deaths of stars.

An outline of how those elements form as stars grow and explode and fade and merge is detailed in a review article published Jan. 31 is the journal Science.

“The universe went through some very interesting changes, where all of a sudden the periodic table—the total number of elements in the universe—changed a lot,” said Jennifer Johnson, a professor of astronomy at The Ohio State University and the article’s author.

“For 100 million years after the Big Bang, there was nothing but hydrogen, helium and lithium. And then we started to get carbon and oxygen and really important things. And now, we’re kind of in the glory days of populating the periodic table.”

The periodic table has helped humans understand the elements of the universe since the 1860s, when a Russian chemist, Dmitri Mendeleev, recognized that certain elements behaved the same way chemically, and organized them into a chart—the periodic table.

It is chemistry’s way of organizing elements, helping scientists from elementary school to the world’s best laboratories understand how materials around the universe come together.

But, as scientists have long known, the periodic table is just made of stardust: Most elements on the periodic table, from the lightest hydrogen to heavier elements like lawrencium, started in stars.

The table has grown as new elements have been discovered—or in cases of synthetic elements, have been created in laboratories around the world—but the basics of Mendeleev’s understanding of atomic weight and the building blocks of the universe have held true.

Nucleosynthesis—the process of creating a new element—began with the Big Bang, about 13.7 billion years ago. The lightest elements in the universe, hydrogen and helium, were also the first, results of the Big Bang. But heavier elements—just about every other element on the periodic table—are largely the products of the lives and deaths of stars.

Johnson said that high-mass stars, including some in the constellation Orion, about 1,300 light years from Earth, fuse elements much faster than low-mass stars. These grandiose stars fuse hydrogen and helium into carbon, and turn carbon into magnesium, sodium and neon. High-mass stars die by exploding into supernovae, releasing elements—from oxygen to silicon to selenium—into space around them.

Smaller, low-mass stars—stars about the size of our own Sun—fuse hydrogen and helium together in their cores. That helium then fuses into carbon. When the small star dies, it leaves behind a white dwarf star. White dwarfs synthesize other elements when they merge and explode. An exploding white dwarf might send calcium or iron into the abyss surrounding it. Merging neutron stars might create rhodium or xenon. And because, like humans, stars live and die on different time scales—and because different elements are produced as a star goes through its life and death—the composition of elements in the universe also changes over time.

“One of the things I like most about this is how it takes several different processes for stars to make elements and these processes are interestingly distributed across the periodic table,” Johnson said. “When we think of all the elements in the universe, it is interesting to think about how many stars gave their lives—and not just high-mass stars blowing up into supernovae. It’s also some stars like our Sun, and older stars. It takes a nice little range of stars to give us elements.”

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, meets with supporters after speaking at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122233875-173198c3b0554fa29563534557fa7ed0.jpgSen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, meets with supporters after speaking at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122233875-ec8479e280fc44479c64bf9e15293e46.jpgSen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/02/web1_122233875-f3bf0cdcb23c45d3be6618a729f72350.jpgSen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a rally in Brunswick, Ohio before kicking off his multi-state tour of states that cast pivotal early votes in the 2020 presidential primary, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Brown began his "Dignity of Work" tour Wednesday in Brunswick, Ohio. The circuit is a key step before he decides whether to launch a campaign for the White House. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
OHIO NEWS

Staff & Wire Reports