Browns there; team set for HBO’s ‘Hard Knocks’


By TOM WITHERS - AP Sports Writer



FILE - In this May 4, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) runs a drill during rookie minicamp at the NFL football team's training camp facility in Berea, Ohio. A person familiar with the decision says the Browns will appear on HBO's "Hard Knocks" this season. Coming off a historic 0-16 season, the Browns were chosen after declining the opportunity several times, said the person who spoke Thursday, May 17, to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

FILE - In this May 4, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) runs a drill during rookie minicamp at the NFL football team's training camp facility in Berea, Ohio. A person familiar with the decision says the Browns will appear on HBO's "Hard Knocks" this season. Coming off a historic 0-16 season, the Browns were chosen after declining the opportunity several times, said the person who spoke Thursday, May 17, to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)


CLEVELAND (AP) — Ready or not, the Cleveland Browns are getting their close-up.

Coming off a historic, dismal 0-16 season, the Browns have been chosen to appear on HBO’s popular “Hard Knocks” series that gives NFL fans a behind-the-scenes look at training camp.

The Browns have turned down previous opportunities to be on the award-winning series. But with renewed optimism around Cleveland following the recent draft, and the selection of quarterback Baker Mayfield, the team is granting HBO unlimited access to its upcoming camp.

Cleveland is the 13th franchise to participate in “Hard Knocks,” which began in 2001 with the Baltimore Ravens. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were featured last summer.

Although they’ve won only one game the past two seasons under coach Hue Jackson, the Browns see the show as a possibility to highlight some of their younger players and put a positive spin on their rebuild.

And for HBO, Mayfield’s quest to win the starting job is just one of several juicy story lines.

“NFL Films has always been exceptional at bringing fans closer to the game and they do an outstanding job with every show they produce, including HBO’s Hard Knocks,” Browns owners Dee and Jimmy Haslam said. “We have been asked multiple times about being featured on Hard Knocks, and we really felt like it was our turn this year and the timing was right. We want to be great partners in this league, and we also recognize Hard Knocks gives fans a special opportunity to learn more about our team and players.”

HBO’s cameras are certain to focus on Mayfield, the brash Heisman Trophy winner from Oklahoma the Browns chose over other quarterbacks. Mayfield is expected to back up Tyrod Taylor this season, but their competition could make for the kind compelling TV that has made the series a must-watch for football junkies.

A 30-person film crew will be at the team’s training facility in Berea to record more than 2,000 hours of footage for the five-segment series that will debut Aug. 7.

The Browns have some good young players who are not well known outside Cleveland. But “Hard Knocks” will give national exposure to budding stars like defensive end Myles Garrett, Mayfield and safety Jabrill Peppers and give the network a chance to tell the well-documented story of former Pro Bowl wide receiver Josh Gordon, who has missed most of the past three seasons because of drug suspensions.

Mayfield has experience in front of the cameras. He was recently featured in a recent documentary series as he prepared for the draft, and feels the Browns can make “Hard Knocks” a positive experience.

“For me looking at it, and us as a team, I’d say it can be good if you handle it right. I’ll just say that,” he said on SiriusXM NFL Radio. “If you think about it as a way to get on camera and try to show off and do certain things and handle it the wrong way then that can be very negative, it can be a distraction. But if you use it as a sense of, ‘OK, I got to block out everything else and just focus on playing ball,’ then that can be a great thing for us.”

Jackson and Browns defensive coordinator Gregg Williams have both been on “Hard Knocks” — Jackson with the Cincinnati Bengals in 2013 and Williams with the Los Angeles Rams in 2016.

“Being able to bring our fans in so they can get to know our players and our organization in a different way will be a huge positive for us,” Jackson said. “I want people to see how much our players and coaches care, how hard they work and how badly they want to win for Cleveland. This will be a great opportunity for our team.”

Browns general manager John Dorsey had reservations about the series, but feels the team is equipped to handle the added scrutiny.

“Once we sat down and talked about it as an organization, I feel a lot better and understand why the time is right,” said Dorsey, who has been overhauling the team since being hired in December. “Hue and I both feel like this team is in a good place and that we are in the process of building something that will lead to success.”

For more NFL coverage: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

Why an upcoming appointment makes us less productive

Ohio State University

Study shows an hour seems shorter when there’s a task looming

COLUMBUS, Ohio – You’ve got a full hour until your next meeting. But you probably won’t make the most of that time, new research suggests.

In a series of eight studies, both in the lab and real life, researchers found that free time seems shorter to people when it comes before a task or appointment on their calendar.

“We seem to take a mental tax out of our time right before an appointment,” said Selin Malkoc, co-author of the study and associate professor of marketing at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business.

“We figure something might come up, we might need some extra time, even when there’s no need to do that. As a result, we do less with the available time.”

The study appears online in the Journal of Consumer Research.

In an online study of 198 people, Malkoc and her colleagues asked some participants to imagine they had a friend coming over to visit in one hour and “you are all ready for your friend to come by.” The others were told that they had no plans for the evening.

All participants were asked how many minutes “objectively” they could spend reading during the next hour and how many minutes they “subjectively” felt like they could spend reading during that same hour.

“Regardless of whether they had a friend coming by or not, participants said that they objectively had about 50 minutes available to read,” Malkoc said.

“That’s an amazing finding right there. Most people didn’t think even objectively they had a full hour to read. People are putting a little ‘just-in-case’ time into their schedules when there is no real reason to do that.”

When they were asked how much time they felt they had to read – the subjective measurement – those with a friend coming by felt that they had 10 more minutes missing in their hour – about 40 minutes.

The results held up in real-life studies as well.

The researchers asked participants recruited online to provide their actual schedules for the next day. Participants indicated when each scheduled task on their calendar would begin and how much time they would need before each task to prepare.

Participants were then offered the opportunity to take part in either a 30-minute or a 45-minute study on that day. The 30-minute study paid $2.50 and the 45-minute study paid twice as much: $5.

For some participants, the study was scheduled in the one hour before they said they had to start getting ready for their next appointment. The others were not scheduled up against another of their appointments.

Even though they had plenty of time to finish the 45-minute study, participants who had an appointment in an hour were significantly more likely than the others to choose the 30-minute study instead of the 45-minute version.

“It was clear they would have plenty of time to finish and have extra time before their next appointment, but they still were more likely to choose the 30-minute study – even when they had a clear financial incentive to choose the longer study,” Malkoc said.

People also seem to get more done when they don’t have a scheduled task hanging over their heads, the researchers found.

In a study of 158 college students, a researcher told participants when they arrived at the lab that study sessions were running faster than expected so she wanted to wait to see if more participants arrived.

Some participants were reminded that they had a task coming up soon: They were told “they had about five minutes before we could get started. You can do whatever you want before we will get started.”

Others weren’t reminded about their upcoming task and were simply told “they had about five minutes to do whatever you want.”

After the time had passed, all participants wrote down what they did during the five-minute interval. The students indicated they did things like sending a text message, checking email and visiting social media sites.

But those who weren’t reminded they had an upcoming task performed more activities (an average of 2.38) than those who were told they had a task soon (an average of 1.86).

“You don’t feel like you can get as much done when you have a task coming up soon. The time seems shorter,” Malkoc said.

These findings suggest that looming tasks on our calendar make us less productive, according to Malkoc.

“We feel that if we have a meeting in two hours, we shouldn’t work on any big projects. So we may spend time just answering emails or doing things that aren’t as productive,” she said.

That may explain why, on days when we have meetings spread throughout, we feel like we have accomplished little. The problem is that we aren’t maximizing the time in between those meetings, she said.

One solution, she said, is to try to stack all your meetings together. That way, you have longer, uninterrupted times when you feel you can tackle the bigger projects on your agenda.

It is also good to remind yourself of how much time you really do have available.

“We seem to overestimate the things that might happen to take up our time, so we don’t get things done,” she said.

Malkoc conducted the study with Gabriella Tonietto, assistant professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick, and Stephen Nowlis, professor of marketing at Washington University’s Olin Business School.

Four-peat! Ohio State wins national EcoCAR 3 competition

Ohio State University

Student engineer team named best in nation in contest to redesign a Chevy Camaro

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio State University won first place in the final year of EcoCAR 3, an Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and General Motors Co. This is the fourth consecutive win for the Buckeyes.

EcoCAR 3 is a four-year collegiate automotive engineering competition that challenges 16 North American universities to redesign a 2016 Chevrolet Camaro to further reduce its environmental impact while maintaining the iconic Camaro performance and safety.

In addition to the coveted first place trophy and bragging rights, the Buckeyes will also take home $33,000 to further support the university’s advanced vehicle technology program.

“This year the students excelled at both the pre-competition deliverable, the oral report, and the presentations,” said Ohio State team faculty advisor Shawn Midlam-Mohler. “Our students are able to build a great car, but they’re also able to communicate in both written and oral communication – the thought process, the design, the validation – all of that effort that goes into building a car.”

“But our overall our team philosophy focused on building students instead of building a car.”

Ohio State’s team was in first place going into the competition and earned 895 out of 1,000 overall points.

“The biggest challenge for Year Four was really just creating a vehicle that was better than we had in Year Three and being able to get at this performance aspect of a hybrid-electric vehicle while also focusing very heavily on reducing emissions,” said Briana Antinoro, co-communications manager for the team. “We get very hands-on, we work with every component within the car.”

Ohio State’s crew won 18 awards, including the NSF Diversity, Inclusion and Equity Award, the NSF Outstanding Advisor Award (Midlam-Mohler) and the first place NSF Innovation Award.

Individual team members also earned awards, including electrical team lead Kerri Loyd who received the General Motors Rookie in Engineering Award.

One feature that set apart the Buckeyes’ vehicle from their competitors is its electrically heated catalyst that reduced startup emissions by 85 percent.

“We actually had fuel economy that was 20 percent higher than our next competitor in that area,” said team lead and engineering manager Brandon Bishop.

West Virginia University and the University of Alabama took second and third place in the competition, respectively.

In addition to sweeping all four years of EcoCAR 3, in 2014 the Buckeyes also captured top honors in the final year of the EcoCAR 2: Plugging In To The Future competition.

“EcoCAR3 is a great program that fosters future generations of automotive engineers and business people, encouraging them to become true innovators,” said Ken Morris, General Motors vice president of Global Product Programs. “This year’s winners – and all the teams – are proof of that. It’s a competition that GM is proud to support.”

The Ohio State EcoCAR sponsors include Parker-Hannifin, Cooper Tires, Clean Fuels Ohio, Transportation Research Center, TE Connectivity, Johnson Controls, Parker, Tremec, Ford, Honda, 3dparts.com and Modern Driveline.

The EcoCAR 3 competition is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and General Motors. Additional sponsors include MathWorks; National Science Foundation; California Air Resources Board; NXP; AVL Powertrain Engineering; the Bosch Group; ETAS; PACCAR; dSpace, Inc.; Snap-on Tools; Siemens PLM Software; GKN Driveline; Transportation Research Center; HORIBA; DENSO; Champlain Cable; Woodward; Proterra; Ricardo; Mentor Automotive; New Eagle; Gage Products; Tesa Tape; Vector CANtech, Inc.; Delphi Foundation; EcoMotors; Electric Power Research Institute, Inc.; A123 Systems; Flextronics; and Samsung, SDI.

Know your rights when hiring a moving company

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

COLUMBUS, OHIO (May 31, 2018) – The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) wants Ohioans to remember that when hiring a moving company, you have rights guaranteed by law and enforced by the PUCO.

Before deciding to hire a mover, ensure they are properly registered with the PUCO to do business in Ohio (for in-state moves), or the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (for interstate moves).

When planning your move, it is important to know a few things about your rights regarding estimates, bill of lading, insurance coverage and claims.

Estimate: the expected cost, in writing, the company provides to you prior to your move.

• The estimate should be in writing unless your move will cost $500 or less or is scheduled within five days of request.

• The moving company has the option of providing you with one of three kinds of estimates: nonbinding, binding and guaranteed-not-to-exceed. The type will be clearly stated on the estimate.

• Do not assume that something is included in the estimate if it is not in writing.

Bill of lading: similar to a receipt, identifies who owns the household goods on the moving company’s truck.

• A bill of lading will be attached to the estimate while the shipment is in route.

• You may request an inventory of your household goods when the company is loading them, but the company may charge an additional fee for that service.

Liability coverage: all moving companies are responsible for the value of the goods transported.

• Companies must have cargo insurance in an amount equal to the declared value of your shipment.

• Moving companies may offer different types of reimbursement for lost or damaged goods, but must offer full replacement value.

• Generally, the higher the carrier cargo liability, the higher the cost to you. • On your estimate, you will initial to indicate the type of coverage you choose.

• The moving company may reserve the right to repair any damaged items prior to replacing regardless of the level of coverage selected. This must be stated in your written estimate.

• If the company does not have a reimbursement option, you are entitled to the full replacement value of any lost or damaged goods.

Claims: a written explanation of any loss or damage to any items during your move, submitted to the moving company.

• The company must provide you with at least 60 days to file a claim.

• The company must acknowledge the receipt of your claim, in writing, within 15 days after they

receive it.

• The company, within 30 days of receiving your claim, must pay, decline, or make a firm compromise settlement offer.

More information

• If you are planning an interstate move, visit the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration website for more information.

• Visit www.PUCO.ohio.gov for more information on hiring a moving company, a moving to-do checklist and a list of PUCO-registered household goods movers.

If you cannot resolve a dispute with your moving company, contact the PUCO at (800) 686-PUCO (7826) or file a complaint online.

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) is the sole agency charged with regulating public utility service. The role of the PUCO is to assure all residential, business and industrial consumers have access to adequate, safe and reliable utility services at fair prices while facilitating an environment that provides competitive choices. Consumers with utility-related questions or concerns can call the PUCO Call Center at (800) 686-PUCO (7826) and speak with a representative.

FILE – In this May 4, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) runs a drill during rookie minicamp at the NFL football team’s training camp facility in Berea, Ohio. A person familiar with the decision says the Browns will appear on HBO’s "Hard Knocks" this season. Coming off a historic 0-16 season, the Browns were chosen after declining the opportunity several times, said the person who spoke Thursday, May 17, to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/06/web1_120558337-e3a710e4916e41c6b48898b27114c605.jpgFILE – In this May 4, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) runs a drill during rookie minicamp at the NFL football team’s training camp facility in Berea, Ohio. A person familiar with the decision says the Browns will appear on HBO’s "Hard Knocks" this season. Coming off a historic 0-16 season, the Browns were chosen after declining the opportunity several times, said the person who spoke Thursday, May 17, to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

By TOM WITHERS

AP Sports Writer

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