Frost, Records, Stretching


Staff & Wire Reports



In this Dec. 3, 2017, photo, Nebraska NCAA college football head coach Scott Frost poses for a photo at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Neb. Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods former coach Tom Osborne successfully used. Frost's job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

In this Dec. 3, 2017, photo, Nebraska NCAA college football head coach Scott Frost poses for a photo at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Neb. Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods former coach Tom Osborne successfully used. Frost's job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)


In this July 31, 2018, photo, former Nebraska coach Tom Osborne smiles during an interview in his office in Lincoln, Neb. Current Nebraska NCAA college football head coach Scott Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods Osborne successfully used. Frost's job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)


Nebraska head coach Scott Frost speaks during an NCAA college football news conference in Lincoln, Neb., Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods Osborne successfully used. Frost's job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. 2018. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)


Frost plans to follow Osborne formula to rebuild Nebraska

By ERIC OLSON

AP College Football Writer

Thursday, August 2

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Tom Osborne, like most others in this football-mad state, senses a resurgence coming for one of the college game’s historical blue bloods.

The 81-year-old Osborne, who won 255 games in his 25 years and ended his career with national titles in three of his last four seasons, acknowledged he had disconnected emotionally from the program as it languished under Mike Riley. Nebraska’s first preseason practice under new coach Scott Frost is Friday and Osborne is among the many interested in what happens next.

“I guess I’m a little bit more engaged right now in terms of wanting to go to practice, wanting to be actively watching the games than maybe in the last three years,” Osborne said in an interview. “Not that I wasn’t interested and not that I didn’t want them to do well, but I just really didn’t understand the culture. So this culture, I think, I will understand a lot better.”

Osborne should. The culture Frost promises, after all, is going to be akin to the one Osborne fostered back in the day when the Cornhuskers were among the best teams in the nation.

Frost lived it as Osborne’s quarterback in 1996-97, when Nebraska went 24-2, 16-0 in Big 12 regular-season games, and split the ‘97 national title with Michigan.

“If you have a company that’s best in its sector for 25 years and then it underperforms for the next 10 or 15, you’re crazy if you don’t look back at what made that company the best in its field for as long as Nebraska was the best in college football,” Frost said. “We need to get a lot of those things back. We’re going to embrace some of the same ideas and try to get the program back close to where it was when coach Osborne was here.”

That means pursuing prospects who truly fit the system — in this case, Frost’s no-huddle spread option offense and the 3-4 defense — and developing them rather than chasing and pampering four- and five-star recruits.

It means bringing back a cutting-edge strength program that was the envy of college football from the 1970s through the ’90s and spawned beefy offensive linemen who wore down the opposition.

It means restoring the walk-on program to the point it builds the roster to 150 players, facilitates a practice environment where players are fully engaged rather than standing around, and stimulates competition where hungry prospects are given opportunities to push scholarship players for jobs.

“Coach Osborne had the formula figured out,” Frost said. “Some of the things he did to make the program arguably the best in the country can still work today. Nebraska has just gone away from them. We’re going to adopt a lot of things again and do it in a modern way and do it in a way that recruits and kids are going to want to be a part of.”

Frost left his job as Oregon’s offensive coordinator to take over a Central Florida program that was winless in 2015. Last season, his UCF team went 13-0 with a Peach Bowl win over Auburn, and he was Associated Press national coach of the year. His homecoming to Nebraska has been one of the top stories of the offseason.

The 43-year-old Frost grew up 100 miles west of Lincoln and it seems a natural fit that he would embrace Osborne’s ways.

“Tradition is a wonderful thing when you have it. We have it here because of guys like coach Osborne,” Frost said. “Might be me, but I think he’s looked happier and healthier the last few months. I’ve spent a lot of my life trying to make people like coach Osborne proud, and I won’t stop now.”

Still, don’t expect Frost to be Osborne 2.0.

“This isn’t going be a reincarnation of 1995, 1996 or 1997,” Osborne said. “He’s going to have his own offense, his own defense, his own way of doing things. I think he does understand some of the basics you better do at a place like Nebraska, where there is a lack of significant population and a certain culture. That’s why I would predict he’ll be very successful.”

Frost said he is pleased with the groundwork done in the spring and summer, but how the Huskers fare in the Big Ten West in 2018 is anyone’s guess. He inherited a program that went 4-8 and allowed more than 50 points in four losses. Also, the Huskers have no quarterbacks who have taken a snap in a college game.

“I know if we’re getting better day by day, we’re going to be really dangerous and hard to beat in the very near future,” Frost said. “We’ll see how this first year goes. People better get us now because we’re going to keep getting better.”

The Huskers already have seen significant gains under strength coach Zach Duvall, who worked with Boyd Epley as a Husker Power assistant in the 1990s and came with Frost from UCF along with most of the coaching staff. The 2018 fall roster shows the projected starting offensive linemen have gained 15-25 pounds since the spring.

There are at least 19 new walk-ons joining the team, and several of them could play this season.

Osborne, who rarely showed up in the football complex after his run as athletic director ended in 2012, said he plans to go to practice once or twice a week.

A year ago, Osborne gave up his Memorial Stadium suite, saying he didn’t need the spacious box and that the athletic department could use the revenue from selling it. He said Tuesday the athletic department has reserved the box for him this year and welcomes him to use it to entertain boosters, former players and friends.

Osborne is all in — again.

“He’s around all the time. I want him around,” Frost said. “That’s an unbelievable well of wisdom I can tap in to. He’s been in my seat. He knows Nebraska. If I have any problem, I’m going to Tom.”

More AP college football: https://collegefootball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

America’s Run for the Fallen Completing its Coast-to-Coast Run to Arlington

Runners Arrive at Arlington National Cemetery on August 5 for Closing Ceremony

August 3, 2018

On August 5, runners honoring fallen American service members arrived in Arlington, completing their 6,100-mile cross-country run passing through 19 states enroute from Fort Irwin, California to Arlington National Cemetery. At every mile along the run, runners pause for a short ceremony to call out each name of the soldiers, sailors, airmen, coast guard and marines killed on a different day since the War on Terror began.

“America’s Run for the Fallen” is organized by Honor and Remember, a veteran and Gold Star Family organization that seeks to individually recognize nearly 20,000 Fallen Service Members since the USS Cole (October 2000).

Thousands of Gold Star families and fellow vets have flown, driven, and run from all over the country to attend the ceremonies commemorating specific dates. The runners, families, and comrades have been joined by communities (and countless high school bands!) all along the route. When this race completes, it will be the largest and longest tribute of this kind ever for fallen service members.

Saban: Jalen Hurts’ comments don’t affect Alabama team

By AP

Thursday, August 9

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — Alabama coach Nick Saban responded Wednesday to quarterback Jalen Hurts, saying the QB’s recent comments about his treatment by the staff aren’t an issue for the team and won’t have any bearing on the competition for the starting job.

Hurts expressed some disappointment Saturday in the coaches’ communication with him about the quarterback battle between he and Tua Tagovailoa.

Hurts said the staff never “asked how I felt.”

He hadn’t previously been allowed to speak to reporters since the night of the title game and said now “the narrative has already been created.” The comments made national headlines, but Saban downplayed the impact on the Crimson Tide team.

“Every player has a right to express what he feels and what he thinks, and I think he has every right to do that with every coach or anybody in the organization who he has relationships with, which we certainly do quite often with all players at all positions,” Saban said after Wednesday’s practice.

“Look, this is probably a lot more important to people outside this organization than it is to people inside. I don’t think it has any effect on our team. I’ve talked to a lot of our team leaders. The players are focused on what they need to do.”

Hurts is 26-2 as a starter but then-freshman Tagovailoa replaced him in last year’s national championship game and led a second-half rally against Georgia.

Now, Tagovailoa is regarded as the front-runner for the job. Regardless, Saban said Hurts’ comments won’t decide who emerges as the starter.

“The rhetoric will not have anything to do with who’s the quarterback,” the coach said. “That will obviously be decided on the field by how people execute, how they do their job. The same parameters that we’ve talked about before in terms of who wins the team. And winning the team goes along with execution, leadership, players having confidence and belief.

“And that’s not going to change. I don’t really have any more to say about it than that. I don’t think it is anything that has affected our team one way or the other.”

More AP college football: http://collegefootball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

In Ohio, you can fight public records battles with one click and $25

By Dennis Hetzel

Ohio News Media Association

Ohio’s state and local governments likely hold hundreds of records that might be important to you or your family.

However, it’s not something you’ll ponder until you urgently need access to documents like birth records, police reports, property records, the minutes of your school board’s last meeting, or any of countless other records in the government’s possession.

Most government officials are honorable and try to fulfill requests, but that’s not always the case. Sometimes there are legitimate differences of opinion. Sometimes, officials are obstinate and don’t want to supply a record for any number of reasons, including often spurious claims of attorney-client privilege or protecting trade secrets.

Until 2016, the playing field in Ohio tilted heavily in the government’s direction. It was easy for officials to say “no” – even when they should’ve said “yes.” That’s because they knew that most citizens did not have the financial resources to file a lawsuit and go to court. That was the only available path in contrast to many other states that had developed easy, affordable ways to appeal a records denial.

Actually, the playing field tilted even more than you might think. If you tried to represent yourself to save money, you were at a huge disadvantage versus government attorneys, many of them quite experienced and crafty in the nuances of Ohio’s public records laws. If you sued a state agency, it was you vs. the attorney general’s office.

On top of that, it remains extremely difficult under Ohio law, even when you’re right and you win, to get attorney fees reimbursed, so your battle was a crusade that required a fat checkbook.

In the old days, media outlets willingly took up a lot of battles. Today, with resources stretched thin, dollars are lacking for all but the most critical cases. Our Ohio Coalition for Open Government, of which I’m president, helps organizations and individuals in major cases, but OCOG’s total resources are less than $80,000. One or two protracted court battles would drain us to zero.

The Ohio News Media Association spent several years telling legislators that it was time to do something. Keith Faber, then president of the Ohio Senate, drew on his background as a mediator to suggest a unique-in-America process that just might be the best appeals process in the country.

Now, for $25 and the time to fill out an online form on the Ohio Court of Claims website, you can appeal a denial. Some cases get resolved with a phone call. Mediation comes next, which can be done remotely so you don’t have to make a trip to Columbus. If mediation fails, you’ll get a ruling that has legal authority. Both sides still have appeal rights.

The process – nearly two years old now – has worked beyond our expectations. I have a few favorite cases already.

The top of my hit parade is Shaffer v. Budish, a case in which Cuyahoga County tried to block a reporter’s access to body camera footage in a jail incident by arguing, in part, that the camera revealed confidential “security and infrastructure” imagery.

The reporter pointed out that the county had let a documentary crew into the jail to film the same allegedly secret area. The court said you can’t have it both ways, and most of what was requested had to be released.

In Chernin v. Geauga County Park District, the park district tried to make the absurd argument that a letter with complaints and recommendations was not a “public record” under Ohio law even though the document was cited in a public meeting. The citizen got the record.

Government agencies win their share of cases, too, and that’s appropriate. What’s important is that citizens now have a fighting chance – no matter their resources or standing.

To check it out, go to https://ohiocourtofclaims.gov/ and click on the “public records” tab. If the information on that website doesn’t answer your questions, OCOG and the ACLU of Ohio both offer online resources to citizens. OCOG also has a legal hotline service for its supporters. (Go to www.ohioopengov.com.)

Don’t be shy. Just the act of following through when government says “no” helps keep public officials on their toes.

Dennis Hetzel is executive director of the Ohio News Media Association and president of the Ohio Coalition for Open Government.

The Conversation

Why stretching is (still) important for weight loss and exercise

August 6, 2018

Author

David Prologo

Associate Professor, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University

Disclosure statement

David Prologo does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

There seems to be a lot of confusion regarding the value – or lack thereof – of muscle stretching to accelerate recovery after exercise. “Stretching clears out your lactic acid,” and other similar claims abound. Is any of this true?

Sort of.

First, it is important to understand the difference between stretching for recovery and stretching for remodeling.

Recovery

During exercise, muscles are called upon to work. During this work, fuel is used up, waste products are created and muscle fiber structure is disrupted by multiple micro tears. Imagine a banquet, for comparison, during which the food is eaten, garbage is accumulated (napkins, chicken bones, etc.), and the table settings disrupted. Before the next banquet, the food needs to be restocked, the garbage cleared, and the tables reset.

For muscles, this process of resetting for the next event is called recovery. The muscle is returned to full function without soreness.

This is not the process that leads to body change per se, but it is important for athletes who wish to compete at their highest level multiple times during a short period.

Athletes have tried many things to speed up recovery: cryotherapy, massage, compression, ice water immersion, stretching, hyperbaric oxygen, anti-inflammatories and electromyostimulation, just to name a few. These interventions are aimed at decreasing lactic acid, inflammatory markers and other molecules that build up following intense exercise.

Of these, only massage is consistently effective. Multiple studies have shown that stretching does not aid significantly in waste removal or serve in any capacity to accelerate muscle recovery.

Remodeling

Most of us aren’t training for professional competitions, though, but are exercising to be healthy, lose weight and improve our moods.

For that, we need to focus on our body’s remodeling response to exercise, which is not the same as recovery from exercise.

Plainly said, when we exercise consistently, our bodies adapt to that stressor by changing our muscle structure, metabolism and physiology. It is that change, that remodeling, that leads to all the positive benefits of exercise. To stick with our banquet example, if we realized that 500 people are going to show up at every event, but we only have 10 tables set at present, we would change our capacity to be ready for the next event. We would increase the efficiency in the kitchen and set more tables. Likewise, our body remodels itself to adapt to increasing exercise.

Many studies also have been conducted to determine how to optimize the body’s remodeling response to exercise. After 35-plus years of study, six variables emerge as consistently aiding the body in its effort to reorganize in response to exercise: timing of nutritional intake (specifically protein), type of exercise, massage, sleep, low-dose creatine and – you guessed it – stretching.

Perhaps the most well-known and accepted benefits of muscle stretching exercises are improved or maintained range of motion, or both; alignment of bones and joints; and strengthening of connective tissues – all elements that optimize performance. Many studies have shown that flexibility training (dedicated attention over time to muscle stretching as part of an exercise program) directly improves muscle function, and ultrasound images have documented favorable alterations in muscle architecture following weeks of regular stretching, such as longer fibers. What’s more, a recent study has clearly shown that stretching over time improves blood flow to the muscles during subsequent exercise in animals.

Prior negative commentary around muscle stretching may be misleading to the casual observer. It is true that studies have shown static stretching routines (reach, hold for 30 seconds, release, next stretch) prior to a workout or competition lead to decreases in strength during that event, and that stretching before activity does not prevent injuries, as was long thought. But these are very specific circumstances that don’t apply to most people.

So do I stretch or not?

If you are an elite athlete trying to decrease injury, increase strength or accelerate muscle recovery right before your next event – then no.

If you are most people, exercising to lose weight, be well and improve mood – then yes. It will help with muscle remodeling, connective tissue strengthening, range-of-motion improvement, joint alignment and potentially blood flow during subsequent exercise – all beneficial effects in the long run.

In this Dec. 3, 2017, photo, Nebraska NCAA college football head coach Scott Frost poses for a photo at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Neb. Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods former coach Tom Osborne successfully used. Frost’s job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/08/web1_121073675-a731e52352f749f9ab786aaa2c004cda.jpgIn this Dec. 3, 2017, photo, Nebraska NCAA college football head coach Scott Frost poses for a photo at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Neb. Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods former coach Tom Osborne successfully used. Frost’s job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

In this July 31, 2018, photo, former Nebraska coach Tom Osborne smiles during an interview in his office in Lincoln, Neb. Current Nebraska NCAA college football head coach Scott Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods Osborne successfully used. Frost’s job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/08/web1_121073675-985ecb90f01c41869c31e6b31bda0d41.jpgIn this July 31, 2018, photo, former Nebraska coach Tom Osborne smiles during an interview in his office in Lincoln, Neb. Current Nebraska NCAA college football head coach Scott Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods Osborne successfully used. Frost’s job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

Nebraska head coach Scott Frost speaks during an NCAA college football news conference in Lincoln, Neb., Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods Osborne successfully used. Frost’s job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. 2018. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/08/web1_121073675-7a1548cd6783436589b69c0362bd6a46.jpgNebraska head coach Scott Frost speaks during an NCAA college football news conference in Lincoln, Neb., Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, Frost has said repeatedly that Nebraska made a mistake moving away from the methods Osborne successfully used. Frost’s job is to return his team to the place it held in the college football hierarchy two decades ago by returning to the methods Osborne used on and off the field to make the Cornhuskers great. 2018. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

Staff & Wire Reports