Year of the Transfer


Staff & Wire Reports



FILE - In this Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 file photo, Clemson's Hunter Johnson (15) looks to pass against Miami during the second half of the Atlantic Coast Conference championship NCAA college football game in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone, File)

FILE - In this Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 file photo, Clemson's Hunter Johnson (15) looks to pass against Miami during the second half of the Atlantic Coast Conference championship NCAA college football game in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone, File)


FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 6, 2018 file photo, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow (9) runs through drills during their NCAA college football practice in Baton Rouge, La. Joe Burrow saw his path to playing time at Ohio State looking bleak after spring practice and decided to transfer as a graduate student, making him immediately eligible to play. Now at LSU, Burrow won a starting job _ and sent two more quarterbacks into transfer market. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)


‘Messy’: QB transfers the new normal in college football

By RALPH D. RUSSO

AP College Football Writer

Wednesday, August 29

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — The day after Adrian Martinez was pronounced the winner of Nebraska’s quarterback competition, the runner-up left school.

At Clemson, the arrival of celebrated freshman quarterback Trevor Lawrence sent three other quarterbacks — one a former five-star recruit who signed just last year — looking for new teams.

At Ohio State, Joe Burrow saw his path to playing time looking bleak after spring practice and decided to transfer as a graduate student, making him immediately eligible to play. Now at LSU, Burrow won a starting job — and sent two more quarterbacks into the transfer market.

College quarterbacks are transferring with dizzying frequency, looking for playing time and chasing NFL dreams. It’s become the new normal.

“I’d like to say that you’re going to see a change,” Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly said Tuesday. “When you’re recruiting you’re going to have to have it in your mind that if you’re No. 2 doesn’t feel like he’s going to get a shot you may lose him. I’ve come to grips with it a couple years ago. I don’t see it changing.”

He speaks from experience: Everett Golson, who led Notre Dame to the BCS championship game in 2012, transferred to Florida State in 2015 and Malik Zaire made a similar graduate transfer move last year to Florida.

“There are as many bad stories about the transfer of the quarterback as there are the good stories, too,” Kelly said. “I don’t think it’s a home run, transferring out as the backup quarterback.”

No. 12 Notre Dame’s quarterback situation has been stable this offseason, but that’s becoming increasingly unusual in college football. This offseason, No. 14 Michigan, Notre Dame’s opponent in Saturday’s opener, landed Shea Patterson as a transfer from Mississippi — and had two quarterbacks, Wilton Speight (UCLA) and Alex Malzone (Miami, Ohio) leave.

Michigan is one of at least 11 Power Five teams heading into the season with a transfer atop the depth chart at quarterback.

Patterson was the top-ranked quarterback in the 2016 recruiting class, according to 247Sports’ composite rankings of the major ratings websites. Overall, eight of the top 20 quarterback recruits from 2016 have transferred .

Already four of the top 20 from 2017 have left the teams they signed with, including Hunter Johnson, who was rated No. 2 overall.

Johnson served as a backup for Clemson last season as a freshman. The arrival of Lawrence cleared out Clemson’s quarterback room, leaving only Johnson and senior returning starter Kelly Bryant to compete. Johnson left after spring and is now at Northwestern , where he will sit out this season to fulfill NCAA transfer rules, and, ideally, move into the starting lineup next year after Clayton Thorson departs.

Nebraska’s quarterback situation has been fluid under new coach Scott Frost, a former QB for the Cornhuskers. He signed the freshman Martinez, who enrolled early, and brought in Noah Vedral, a Nebraska native who transferred from UCF, Frost’s previous employer.

After spring practices, Patrick O’Brien, a 2016 signee, announced he was transferring. Frost declared Martinez the starter this week. The next day, Tristan Gebbia, a top-20 quarterback recruit from 2017, left the team.

“It’s hard to manage as a coach and you do what you can for kids and I understand their perspective, they want to play. It would be hypocritical for me to talk about how much we care about the players and not allow someone to do what they want to do and do what’s best for him,” said Frost, who transferred from Stanford to Nebraska when he played. “The flip side of that is we preach to our guys all the time ‘team before me,’ and it would be hypocritical of us to have someone on the team that was me before team.”

Frost is hoping Vedral will get a waiver from the NCAA allowing him to be eligible this season. Frost said schools on quarter systems that start classes later in the year have an advantage when it comes to adding late transfers over schools on semesters like Nebraska.

The NCAA changed some transfer rules this year but kept in place the rule requiring players to sit out one season unless they have graduated. There has been talk of more tweaks to limit grad transfers and maybe give undergraduates more freedom to move with immediate eligibility.

All this quarterback movement makes trying to strike the right balance between what’s best for players and coaches even more challenging.

“It’s going to be messy,” Frost said. “I wouldn’t want to be the one to decide exactly what the rule is, but it’s not fair to the rest of our team when we’re losing kids right before camp that we’re counting on.”

AP Sports Writer Eric Olson contributed to this report.

Follow Ralph D. Russo at www.Twitter.com/ralphDrussoAP and listen at https://www.podcastone.com/AP-Top-25-College-Football-Podcast

More AP college football: https://apnews.com/tag/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

The Conversation

Making college more affordable

August 29, 2018

Authors

Jill Tiefenthaler

President, Colorado College

Eric J. Barron

President, Pennsylvania State University

Reynold Verret,

President, Xavier University of Louisiana, Xavier University of Louisiana

Reviewer

Jane Turnis

Vice President for Communications, Colorado College

Disclosure statement

Jill Tiefenthaler is affiliated with the National Association of Colleges and Universities (NAICU), serving as treasurer and on its executive committee; and with the Annapolis Group, serving as chair of its board of directors. She has received funding from foundations in support of education and research. These include Blue Shield of California Foundation and National Consortium for Violence Research.

Eric J. Barron is currently a member of the University Corp. for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Board of Trustees, APLU Board of Directors, CICEP Chair, College Football Play-off (CFP) Board of Managers, Council on Competitiveness: EMCP Steering Committee, Universities Research Association (URA), Big Ten Council of Presidents and Chancellors and American Talent Initiative (ATI).

Reynold Verret and Xavier University of Louisiana receives and has received funding from federal agencies and foundations in support of education and research. These include the NIH, NSF, NASA, DOD and the Howard Hughes Medical institute

Jane Turnis does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners

Pennsylvania State University provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation US.

Colorado College provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

For instance, states now rely more heavily on tuition to finance their public colleges and universities than on government funding.

Private colleges and universities are also struggling to make ends meet, steering a record amount of tuition revenue toward grant aid for economically needy students.

Meanwhile, the number of student borrowers who defaulted on their student loans edged up last year as did the price of higher education itself.

So we asked our panel of presidents – from Xavier University of Louisiana, Colorado College and Penn State: Given this reality, what are the top two or three things that you believe need to happen to make college more affordable – particularly for low-income students, students of color and the working class?

More than one funder has to step up

Jill Tiefenthaler, President of Colorado College

A college education has many funders. Federal and state governments provide support, as do the institutions of higher education themselves. And then, of course, there is the money paid by the students’ families. Improving access will require additional support from one or more of these sources.

To start at the local level, an increase in state funding would make college more affordable. After all over 70 percent of all undergraduates attend public institutions, and historically, states have been the primary source of funding for both two- and four-year public institutions.

However, states have reduced their support in recent years and, as a result, the burden has fallen on students and their families. The “free college” plans in New York and a few other states are examples of commitments to improve access. However, given the pressure on budgets resulting from underfunded pensions, Medicaid and K-12, I am not optimistic that students can count on increased support from states. In addition, recent tax changes that limit federal deductions for state taxes will increase pressure to keep state income and property tax rates down, further hindering state funding.

Additional support from the federal government, by increasing the Pell Grant program, could make a big difference. The maximum Pell Grant for the 2018-19 academic year is $6,095. This is sufficient to cover the annual tuition at most community colleges. For example, the average tuition at the community college in my city is $4,651. However, only students with family incomes of less than $60,000 qualify and the amount of the grant declines significantly as family income increases. Increasing the income cut-off and providing the full $6,095 to all who qualify would make college much more accessible for low- and middle-income students.

Private nonprofit colleges and universities educate about 20 percent of all undergraduates. The “sticker price” at these institutions gives the impression that they are not accessible to low- and middle-income students. However, privates provide significant institutional aid.

The major source of this support is philanthropy, made up of earnings on endowments and annual gifts. Private institutions with smaller endowments also provide aid from tuition revenue by using the revenue from some students to provide financial aid to other students. However, increasing institutional aid by using tuition revenue is not sustainable. Therefore, the key to making private institutions more affordable is increasing endowments through philanthropy. Although it is true that the new “endowment tax” on large endowments and any changes to the tax deduction for charitable giving reduce the funds available for financial aid. In addition, private institutions could reduce “merit aid” – aid that is awarded on the basis of academic, athletic or artistic merit – and reallocate those funds to need-based financial aid.

Of course, some may argue that rather than finding new sources of revenue, colleges could simply cut their costs and reduce tuition. This would make college more affordable but it would also reduce the quality of the education provided.

Higher education is a very competitive market, and students and their families demand quality – as they should. We must do our best to educate students in a global environment, keeping pace with technological innovations, teaching critical thinking, fostering comfort with ambiguity, and graduating nimble leaders who will thrive in a rapidly changing era.

What needs discussing is the total cost of a degree

Eric Barron, President of Pennsylvania State University

The high level of tuition in U.S. universities can be blamed on many factors. On top of shrinking state appropriations there are more technology-intensive degrees in every field; an aging campus infrastructure; a sharp increase in compliance and regulations reporting; and soaring health care costs.

University administrators should be deeply concerned that our price is limiting access to an education that enables upward mobility. Interestingly, the conversation on access and affordability seems to be fixated on controlling, first and foremost, the increase in tuition. We need to broaden the framing of this discussion considerably.

The first step is to change the conversation to one of the total cost of a degree. The simple fact is that timely completion of a degree is a critical mechanism to control total cost. A tuition increase pales in comparison to going to school for another year.

The second step is to recognize that the only thing worse than going five and six years in order to graduate, is to accumulate debt and drop out before graduation.

Universities like Penn State are justifiably proud of their high graduation rates. However, when you dig deeper, you discover that first-generation, need-based students have a dramatically lower graduation rate than most of their peers. At Penn State, they graduate 22 percentage points below the average. We can point to many factors that cause [this graduation gap], but it’s clearly not due to lack of ambition.

Sixty-two percent of these students work an average of 22 hours a week, usually at minimum wage jobs, so they can’t take a full credit load. It is impossible to graduate in four years. They drop classes more frequently than other students and tend to have lower grades because of their work load. Sadly, they also don’t have time to participate in advantageous activities, such as research or internships. They get discouraged. They either give up or end up attending a fifth or sixth year at a significant cost. If they graduate, they have paid more and gotten less from the experience than other students.

Our universities need a laser-like focus on mitigating all factors that slow the time to the completion of a degree. Every student should have access to financial literacy advisers and tools that help students take the most cost-efficient way to achieve a degree. We need “completion” programs to be a priority and not allow students to slip away because of finances or other hardships.

We can serve our mission of upward mobility and save students millions in costs and debt if we help every student, regardless of financial capability, to graduate, and graduate on time.

The importance of pre-collegiate preparation

Reynold Verret, President of Xavier University of Louisiana

By 2020, nearly two-thirds of jobs will require postsecondary education. Yet, fewer than 45 percent of adult Americans currently have earned an associate degree or higher, as reported in national data.

The cost of higher education and its impact on access and opportunity is a major barrier to more students earning degrees. Talent and ability are not relegated to those of higher means. Our present challenge is to assure education and opportunity for students from all backgrounds. Sadly, we as a nation have been comfortable with very good schools for the haves and less than good ones for the have-nots.

On the federal level, Pell awards should be increased and eligibility expanded for students with the greatest need. Pell awards should also be allowed to continue to apply during the summer terms so that students persist and graduate on time.

On average, an American student takes 5.1 years to earn the bachelor’s degree. Time to degree completion has increased over the past decades due to a number of factors, such as the need to work and inadequate pre-collegiate schooling. Each extra year increases the cost of the bachelor’s degree by 25 percent. The time it takes to earn a bachelor’s degree could be reduced if students didn’t have to take courses to acquire math and language skills that are normally mastered in high school.

Bold steps are needed. This includes building an equitable K-12 educational pipeline that provides better college readiness for all of America’s students. Quality K-12 requires great teachers who remain in the profession and teach in schools with the greatest need. The teaching profession must be elevated and the nation’s best students should be encouraged to become teachers. For their service, school loans should be forgiven or repaid. Colleges and universities should also create postsecondary certificates and credentials meeting the needs of students entering careers that do not require college degrees.

The HBCU where I serve as president, Xavier University of Louisiana, has been leading the nation in educating African-Americans who go on to achieve medical degrees. The school also excels in preparing students who achieve Ph.D.s in the STEM fields. A 2017 study has ranked the university 6th in the nation for social mobility, whereby students from the lower 40 percent of the U.S. income distribution enter the upper 40 percent. Our success and the success of other HBCUs should dispel any notion that talent is associated with socioeconomic status.

The education of our citizens is not only an individual but a collective benefit: America thrives if it develops all of its talent.

Spend AN ACOUSTIC EVENING WITH SHAWN COLVIN at the Davidson on October 12

Shawn Colvin won her first Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album with her debut album, Steady On (1989). She has been a mainstay of the contemporary folk music scene ever since, releasing 12 superlative albums and establishing herself as one of America’s greatest live performers. She triumphed at the 1998 Grammy Awards, winning both Record and Song of the Year for “Sunny Came Home.”

CAPA presents An Acoustic Evening with Shawn Colvin at the Davidson Theatre (77 S. High St.) on Friday, October 12, at 8 pm. Tickets are $31.50 and $41.50 at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

In the 27 years since the release of her debut album, Colvin has won three Grammy Awards, released 11 albums, written a critically acclaimed memoir, maintained a non-stop national and international touring schedule, appeared on countless television and radio programs, had her songs featured in major motion pictures and created a remarkable canon of work.

A small-town childhood in the university town of Carbondale, Illinois, drew Colvin to the guitar by the age of 10. She made her first public appearance on campus at the University of Illinois at age 15. By the late 1970s, Colvin was singing in a Western Swing band in Austin, Texas—the city she now calls home. Moving to New York at the decade’s end, she remained in the country music field as a member of the Buddy Miller Band until she met producer, guitarist, and co-writer John Leventhal who inspired her to find her own voice as a songwriter. She began honing her skill and was soon signed to Columbia records. Her first album, Steady On, won a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Recording.

Colvin continued to win fans and critics with her subsequent releases, Fat City (1992) and Cover Girl (1994). In 1996, she released A Few Small Repairs, which would prove to be her breakthrough. The murder-ballad “Sunny Came Home” gave Colvin a Top 10 hit, a platinum-selling album, and two of Grammy’s biggest honors—Record of the Year and Song of the Year.

Holiday Songs and Lullabies (1998), recorded while Colvin was eight and a half months pregnant with her daughter Caledonia, followed. Her next studio album, Whole New You (2001), found Colvin examining her new motherhood and the responsibilities of family. Polaroids (2004) is a showcase of the first half of her recording career. These Four Walls (2006) was lauded by People Magazine as “the most self-assured album of her career” and “one for the ages” by the Washington Post.

Shawn Colvin Live (2009), was recorded during a special three-night solo engagement at San Francisco’s famous jazz club, Yoshi’s. Praised by both critics and fans, the album was honored with a Grammy Award nomination for Best Contemporary Folk Recording.

All Fall Down (2012), Colvin’s eighth studio album, was the first to be produced by her longtime friend and cohort Buddy Miller. Recorded in Nashville with a group of stellar musicians, the album features performances by Alison Krauss, Emmylou Harris, Jakob Dylan, Bill Frisell, Viktor Krauss, Brian Blade, Stuart Duncan, and Julie Miller.

The release of All Fall Down was simultaneous with that of her memoir, Diamond in the Rough. Its pages tell the inspiring story of a woman honing her artistry, finding her voice, and making herself whole.

The long-awaited Uncovered (2015) includes masterful interpretations of songs by Bruce Springsteen, Paul Simon, Tom Waits, Stevie Wonder, Robbie Robertson, and Graham Nash to name a few, but in their selection and delivery they are pure Shawn Colvin.

In 2016, Colvin and longtime friend Steve Earle united to release, Colvin & Earle, their acclaimed self-titled duo album. Produced by Buddy Miller, Colvin & Earle beautifully captures the pair’s extraordinary chemistry and is a true standout in careers already filled with pinnacles and masterpieces.

Shawn was recently recognized for her career accomplishments when she was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Trailblazer Award at the 2016 Americana Honors and Awards Show.

In celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Grammy-winning A Few Small Repairs, Columbia/Legacy Recordings released an expanded edition of the album in 2017. The anniversary edition includes seven rare, live performances plus enhanced artwork with liner notes by Colvin and Leventhal and archival photos.

Colvin’s most recent release, The Starlighter (2018), is a collection of songs adapted from the children’s music book “Lullabies and Night Songs.” It’s 14 songs are a mix of traditional numbers and children’s standards, an elegant and graceful musical offering that resonates with the warmth and tenderness of poignant familial experience and remembrance.

www.ShawnColvin.com

CALENDAR LISTING

CAPA presents AN ACOUSTIC EVENING WITH SHAWN COLVIN

Friday, October 12, 8 pm

Davidson Theatre (77 S. High St.)

Shawn Colvin won her first Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album with her debut album, Steady On (1989). She has been a mainstay of the contemporary folk music scene ever since, releasing 12 superlative albums and establishing herself as one of America’s greatest live performers. She triumphed at the 1998 Grammy Awards, winning both Record and Song of the Year for “Sunny Came Home.” Tickets are $31.50 and $41.50 at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.capa.com

The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, education excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. CAPA also appreciates the generous support of the Barbara B. Coons and Robert Bartels Funds of The Columbus Foundation and the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

About CAPA

Owner/operator of downtown Columbus’ magnificent historic theatres (Ohio Theatre, Palace Theatre, Southern Theatre) and manager of the Riffe Center Theatre Complex, Lincoln Theatre, Drexel Theatre, Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts (New Albany, OH), and the Shubert Theater (New Haven, CT), CAPA is a non-profit, award-winning presenter of national and international performing arts and entertainment. For more information, visit www.capa.com.

FILE – In this Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 file photo, Clemson’s Hunter Johnson (15) looks to pass against Miami during the second half of the Atlantic Coast Conference championship NCAA college football game in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121251616-4fc8b17f035441e280e576a2c2d0ea51.jpgFILE – In this Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 file photo, Clemson’s Hunter Johnson (15) looks to pass against Miami during the second half of the Atlantic Coast Conference championship NCAA college football game in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone, File)

FILE – In this Monday, Aug. 6, 2018 file photo, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow (9) runs through drills during their NCAA college football practice in Baton Rouge, La. Joe Burrow saw his path to playing time at Ohio State looking bleak after spring practice and decided to transfer as a graduate student, making him immediately eligible to play. Now at LSU, Burrow won a starting job _ and sent two more quarterbacks into transfer market. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121251616-b9fe63cd60e944d6bc995601507fe90d.jpgFILE – In this Monday, Aug. 6, 2018 file photo, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow (9) runs through drills during their NCAA college football practice in Baton Rouge, La. Joe Burrow saw his path to playing time at Ohio State looking bleak after spring practice and decided to transfer as a graduate student, making him immediately eligible to play. Now at LSU, Burrow won a starting job _ and sent two more quarterbacks into transfer market. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Staff & Wire Reports