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Ohio State receiver Terry McLaurin is lifted in celebration by teammate Jaylen Harris after scoring a touchdown against Oregon State during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Ohio State receiver Terry McLaurin is lifted in celebration by teammate Jaylen Harris after scoring a touchdown against Oregon State during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)


Ohio State defensive back Jeffrey Okudah, left, knocks the ball away from Oregon State wide receiver Timmy Hernandez during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)


Ohio State running back Mike Weber scores a touchdown against Oregon State during the second half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State beat Oregon State 77-31. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)


Meyer-less No. 5 Ohio State routs Oregon St 77-31 in opener

By MITCH STACY

AP Sports Writer

Sunday, September 2

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio State came into the opener with a stand-in coach and a new starting quarterback after a truly bizarre preseason that led to a three-game suspension for coach Urban Meyer.

The day worked out OK for the offensively prolific No. 5 Buckeyes, though their defense might still be more of a work in progress than expected.

New starter Dwayne Haskins Jr. threw for a record five touchdowns as Ohio State scored on five of its first six possessions and cruised to a 77-31 rout of overmatched Oregon State on Saturday.

The Buckeyes shook off Meyer’s first absence from the sideline in six years, piling up 721 yards and tying the record for points scored in an opener. Meyer will be allowed to return to practice on Monday, although his suspension by the university will last for two more games. He was sanctioned after an investigation showed he mismanaged former assistant Zach Smith, who was accused of domestic violence and other bad behavior.

The scandal has dogged the program for the past month. Acting coach Ryan Day wasn’t surprised the Buckeyes started strong, jumping ahead 21-7 in the first quarter and going ahead 42-14 at halftime.

“There was a quiet confidence about this team all along,” said Day, the co-offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach.

Haskins, who took the keys from four-year starter J.T. Barrett, was 22 for 30 for 313 yards. The five touchdowns and yards gained are records for a first-time Ohio State starter.

Day coached from the sideline, with co-offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson in the press box.

“I didn’t notice anything different,” Haskins said. “Just having coach Wilson on the field vs. coach Day, they both did a great job giving advice, communicating with me after the drives. There wasn’t any stress with that.”

BRIGHT SPOTS FOR BEAVERS

Oregon State was able to exploit the Ohio State defense, just not enough.

Quarterback Conor Blount, forced into duty when starter Jake Luton went out with a possible concussion on the game’s sixth play, found plenty of cracks, throwing for 169 yards and two touchdowns. But he also was sacked five times in the first half, twice by All-American defensive end Nick Bosa.

Running back Artavis Pierce slashed the Ohio State secondary for touchdowns of 80 and 78 yards on two of the Beavers’ first three plays from scrimmage in the second half. Oregon State piled up 392 offensive yards.

“Obviously, falling short isn’t fun, but when you go out and put 31 points on a defense like that, I think it says there’s a bright future here,” Blount said.

RUNNING BY COMMITTEE

One of the questions in training camp was how Ohio State was going to use talented backs Mike Weber and J.K. Dobbins.

Day platooned the pair Saturday until the backups took over in the second half.

Weber was the star , showing the form he displayed two seasons ago when he rushed for over 1,000 yards. A leg injury slowed him last year and that allowed true freshman Dobbins to grab the limelight.

Weber had 20 carries for 186 yards and three touchdowns. Dobbins had 15 for 74 yards.

“We talked about it, think about it a lot,” Weber said. “It’s the reason I came back. We knew that we were going to split carries. But splitting carries is actually good on the bodies for both of us.”

THE TAKEAWAY

Oregon State: Showed some fight and big-play ability, but the Beavers made too many mistakes and couldn’t slow down Ohio State’s more talented offensive players.

“There’s lots of things to learn from, and be encouraged by,” first-year Oregon State coach Jonathan Smith said. “We were in position to make some plays, we didn’t tackle all that well.”

Ohio State: Shook off all the disruptive off-the-field events of the preseason, scored a lot early and did what it was expected to do, albeit with some holes in the defense. The Buckeyes have another tuneup game next weekend before getting a test against TCU in Dallas in two weeks. Haskins looks like the real deal.

UP NEXT

Oregon State: Beavers host Southern Utah in home opener on Saturday.

Ohio State: Buckeyes will be big favorites again when they host Rutgers on Saturday.

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Ohio State saga points to haziness of coaches policing staff

By KANTELE FRANKO

Associated Press

Monday, September 3

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — What got Urban Meyer in hot water? The suspended Ohio State football coach puts it this way: “My fault was in not taking action sooner against a troubled employee about his work-related issues.”

That now-fired assistant coach had been accused of past spousal violence as well as embarrassing sexual conduct, drug abuse and financial irresponsibility. Outside investigators found some of that affected his work life.

Meyer’s comments about handling that and the ensuing debate about his punishment point to a bigger question in college athletics: To what extent are coaches responsible for policing their staff’s off-field behavior?

Here was Meyer — a coach attentive enough to have staff remind players in advance about drunken-driving checkpoints around Columbus in July — apologizing for not doing more about an assistant who had demonstrated troubling behavior for years, according to outside investigators.

“I should have been more demanding of him in the same way I am of my players, other staff members, and myself,” Meyer, who is suspended for three games but is allowed to resume coaching practices this week, said as he apologized on Aug. 22.

His mea culpa comes just months after the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics recommended that the NCAA create minimum professional standards to ensure coaches are prepared for their leadership roles.

Mastering Xs and Os is different than navigating sensitive personnel matters. To address that, the commission envisions coaches in all sports getting the same training that department heads and other supervisors receive about responding to staff misconduct and other human resources issues, said Amy Perko, the CEO of the commission, which advocates changes to support “the educational mission of college sports.”

“In many cases, coaches have really never received any type of training on some of the more administrative aspects of their job,” Perko said.

Yet as highly paid standard-bearers in big-time college sports, such coaches are often publicly viewed as responsible for their programs and the people in them, sometimes even beyond the scope of what’s outlined in university policies and NCAA rules.

The coaching responsibilities highlighted by the Ohio State saga are about responding when inappropriate behavior comes to light, not about proactively monitoring employees’ private lives, said Stephen Ross, director of the Penn State Institute for Sports Law, Policy and Research, who emphasized that he doesn’t speak for his university.

“Seeing what happened to Urban Meyer, I do not think that (Alabama coach) Nick Saban, right now as he’s getting ready for a football game, is required to bring his coaches into his office on a one-on-one situation and inquire as to their domestic life,” Ross said.

But sports leaders at other universities may learn something from the Ohio State situation about how to handle these kinds of issues, said Bob Vecchione, executive director of the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics, an educational body.

“Maybe they have to peel the onion back a little further, because they had things in place, and maybe now they just need to take it to a new level,” Vecchione said.

The two-week outside investigation conducted for Ohio State concluded that Meyer and athletic director Gene Smith mistakenly believed they didn’t need to do more about domestic abuse allegations against assistant coach Zach Smith back in 2015 unless law enforcement took action against him. Zach Smith wasn’t charged in the 2015 matter, denied being aggressive with his ex-wife and wasn’t fired until late July, after his ex-wife asked a judge for a protective order.

Meyer has emphasized that he doesn’t condone domestic violence, didn’t believe Zach Smith abused his wife, tried to help the struggling couple, and reported what he thought was required to the university. But Meyer’s defensiveness also has drawn him more criticism, with some observers arguing he should’ve publicly apologized to Smith’s wife sooner and challenging his insistence that he didn’t lie to reporters this summer about his knowledge of the 2015 incident.

Meyer said his decisions to repeatedly give his assistant the benefit of the doubt and not press for more information about allegations against him were probably influenced by loyalty to Zach Smith’s grandfather, former Ohio State coach and Meyer mentor Earle Bruce.

Ann Skeet, the senior director of leadership ethics at Santa Clara University’s Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, argues that Meyer especially had an obligation to get more facts about the domestic abuse allegations because relationship violence has been a recurring issue in football and the male-dominated sport has “a built-in blind spot organizationally in terms of what the lived experience of women who are interacting with them might be.”

Like leaders in all sorts of businesses, Meyer had to decide where to draw a line between the professional and personal behavior of employees and whether to take action, she said. But his promises to learn from his acknowledged mistakes might also provide an opportunity.

“He can be positioning himself as a resource for the sport in a tough area if he chooses to,” Skeet said, “and that’s the best of what you’d like to see from a leader who accepts leadership broadly, not just on the field.”

Follow Franko on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/kantele10 .

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Urban Meyer is back with Buckeyes, but not all the way

By MITCH STACY

AP Sports Writer

Monday, September 3

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio State coach Urban Meyer returned to the Woody Hayes Athletic Center on Monday for the first time in a month, arriving before dawn for a staff meeting.

Under the terms of his suspension by Ohio State, Meyer can be on campus, talk to assistants and conduct practice, but he is required to disappear for the 24-hour period surrounding the next two games. He’ll be back on the sideline for the Sept. 22 home game against Tulane.

Players were off Monday so Meyer won’t see most of them until practice Tuesday afternoon.

“Coach came back today, we had a meeting early this morning, he met with of the players, so things are back to normal,” acting coach Ryan Day said during his news conference. “Obviously he won’t be there for game day, but everything else is back to normal.”

Day was put in charge when Meyer was put on paid leave and then suspended by the university for his mismanagement of now-fired assistant coach Zach Smith, who was accused of domestic violence and other troubling behavior.

Day led the Buckeyes to an opening day 77-31 rout of Oregon State on Saturday, a game in which new starting quarterback Dwayne Haskins Jr. threw for five touchdowns but also raised questions about a defense that gave up several big plays to the overmatched Beavers.

Meyer will be in charge during the week, and Day will manage the next two games from the sideline. The co-offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach typically works from the press box on game day.

“We’re just going to kind of pick it up from when coach was here,” Day said. “He’ll be with the team on Friday, he can’t be with them on Saturday, but other than that we’ll keep the routine.”

The Buckeyes will be heavy favorites again Saturday when they host Rutgers, but will get an early test against TCU in Dallas on Sept. 15.

Day smiled when asked about Meyer’s critique of the Oregon State game.

“I think his comment was, ‘You only had to punt once, huh?’” Day said.

Defensive coordinator Greg Schiano said Meyer didn’t waste any time Monday morning.

“It was good,” Schiano said. “Excited to have him back, everybody is. Coach is a very focused guy, as you know, and we got it done, got back to it.”

Day received high marks from players for his running of Saturday’s game.

“He was just happy we stayed steady in the fold and believed in him,” receiver Terry McLaurin said. “He was just happy to be a part of the team.”

NOTES: Schiano said the Ohio State allowed 82 percent of Oregon State’s 392 offensive yards on just seven plays, including runs of 80 and 78 yards by Artavis Pierce. He called that “unacceptable.” … Haskins, whose 313 yards and five TDs were records for a first-time Buckeyes starting QB, was chosen Big Ten offensive player of the week. … Safety Jordan Fuller, who sat out with a hamstring injury, is day-to-day.

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OSU’s interim coach speaks

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The coordinator filling in for Urban Meyer while the Ohio State head coach serves a three game suspension said on Monday that investigators did not interview him as part of their probe on what Meyer knew about domestic violence allegations made against another assistant coach.

Co-offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach Ryan Day in a news conference he had nothing to say about the investigation involving his boss as well as fired colleague Zach Smith, who had coached receivers.

Day declined to answer questions about the scandal, saying he was choosing not to comment “out of respect for everybody involved.”

Day has run the team since Meyer was put on leave two days before training camp opened Aug. 3.

Investigators said in a report released by Ohio State that they interviewed at least 40 witnesses, including key football staff members. Ohio State didn’t immediately respond to messages on Monday seeking comment on why Day wasn’t interviewed and which coaches were.

“Regarding the details of the investigation, I know everyone in here has a job to do, but I was not part of the investigation, I was not interviewed, so I have nothing to add,” Day said during his first media availability of the preseason.

Meyer was suspended Wednesday following a two-week investigation that found Meyer and athletic director Gene Smith tolerated bad behavior for years, including allegations of domestic abuse against Zach Smith, the grandson of former Ohio State coach and Meyer mentor Earle Bruce.

“I understand there’s been a lot of pain and stress for a lot of people surrounding the last few weeks,” Day said. “Our program has been working hard, our coaches and team have been working hard during that time to get ready for the season.”

Regarding the uncertainty of the past three weeks over Meyer’s future with the program, Day said he didn’t see any signs of that wearing on players until Thursday morning when their demeanor made it clear they had stayed up late watching the televised news conference announcing the suspension.

Day is trying to prepare the Buckeyes for the first home opener in six years without Meyer on the sideline. It helps that they likely won’t have to do much heavy lifting. The Buckeyes host Oregon State, a 1-11 team last year that comes in as 38-point underdogs.

Day said he has gotten important support from co-offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson and defensive coordinator Greg Schiano, both of whom have experience as head coaches.

“It has been a whirlwind,” Day said. “But my goal in this was not to replace Coach (Meyer). That’s not what I wanted to do. What I wanted to do was empower the coaches, empower the leaders and just keep this thing moving, and I think we’ve done that.”

Day said he’ll coach from the sideline and call the offensive plays in conjunction with Wilson. He said the team is being led as if Meyer was still present.

“Ryan is certainly qualified to do this,” Schiano said. “Kevin Wilson, myself and the rest of the staff have done this a long time. That all said, we have to step it up. We’re missing our leader, we’re one down right now.”

NOTES: Day said former guard Michael Jordan will start at center, following the departure of Billy Price, who was an All-American last season. Brady Taylor, who seemed to be the one to take over the starting role, also will play. … Baron Browning will start at middle linebacker while Tuf Borland continues to recover from a leg injury, although Schiano said Borland may play. Pete Werner and Malik Harrison will be the starting outside linebackers. … Day said that while Dwayne Haskins Jr. is the solid starter at quarterback, backup Tate Martell likely will play against the Beavers. … Former West Virginia quarterback Chris Chugunov has been added to the roster as a graduate transfer.

Urban Meyer to serve 3-game suspension, forgo 6 weeks pay

Gene Smith to be suspended Aug. 31-Sept. 16 without pay

Ohio State University

COLUMBUS, Ohio – After consulting with The Ohio State University Board of Trustees, President Michael V. Drake today (Aug. 22) announced disciplinary actions for Head Football Coach Urban Meyer and Athletics Director Gene Smith based on an investigative report examining the handling of allegations against an assistant coach.

Meyer will be suspended through Sept. 2, 2018, and for the game days of Sept. 1, 8 and 15. This follows his absence from the team’s training camp while he was on paid administrative leave beginning Aug. 1. He will forgo six weeks of compensation.

Smith will be suspended without pay from Aug. 31 through Sept. 16.

“The discipline reflects our collective judgment based on the findings of the investigative report and the independent committee. The board fully supports this conclusion,” Drake said. “We made this decision today based on the facts and our values as a university. We value the truth, and this independent team thoroughly and faithfully sought the truth. We value consensus, and today’s decision represents the collective wisdom of the board and the leadership of our university.”

Mary Jo White, senior chair with the national law firm Debevoise & Plimpton and former chair of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, led the independent investigative team.

The investigators interviewed more than 40 witnesses and reviewed thousands of documents, including police reports, court filings, employment contracts and relevant university and NCAA rules and policies. The full report is here. Findings from the independent review include:

  • Meyer has a sincere commitment to the Respect for Women core value that he espouses and tries to instill in his players.
  • Although Meyer and Gene Smith failed to adhere to the precise requirements of their contracts, they did so based upon a good faith belief that they did not have sufficient information to trigger a reporting obligation or initiate a disciplinary action against former assistant coach Zach Smith in the absence of law enforcement action.
  • Because other witnesses had the same uncertainties about what triggers university reporting obligations, Ohio State will clarify its requirements and implement additional training to reinforce them.
  • Meyer made misstatements at the Big Ten Media Days, but those misstatements were not part of a cover-up effort to keep Zach Smith on the coaching staff.
  • In light of the investigation’s identification of multiple examples of inappropriate conduct by Zach Smith while employed as an assistant football coach, Meyer and Gene Smith went too far in allowing him to remain as an employee in the face of that misconduct.

“I know the impact that the events of the last three weeks have had on this institution – an institution that I love – and how challenging this has been for our community and our president, a man for whom I have great respect. And for that, I am deeply sorry,” Meyer said. “I am fully aware that I am ultimately responsible for this situation that has harmed the university as a whole, our Department of Athletics and our football program. I want to also apologize to Buckeye Nation.

“The suspensions are tough, but I fully accept them.”

Gene Smith said that prior to the start of his suspension, he will consult with Ryan Day to reaffirm his continued service as acting head coach.

“I fully support the findings of the report and the subsequent actions that the university has taken,” Smith said.

“I want to thank our university community and all of Buckeye Nation for their understanding and humbly ask them for their continued support of our student-athletes – particularly our football team as they have prepared for the start of another season and academic year through all of this.”

An independent working group formed by trustees to direct the work of the investigative team was led by former Ohio House Speaker Jo Ann Davidson and included former acting U.S. Deputy Attorney General Craig Morford, former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio Carter Stewart and current university trustees Alex Fischer, Janet Porter and Alex Shumate.

“Our gratitude goes to our board, university leadership, our independent group and the investigators,” said Board Chair Michael J. Gasser. “They worked exhaustively, and we are pleased to come to a resolution.”

Statement from Urban Meyer

Aug. 24, 2018

My words and demeanor on Wednesday did not show how seriously I take relationship violence. I sincerely apologize. I was taught at a very young age that if I ever hit a woman, I would be kicked out of the house and never welcomed back. I have the same rule in my house and in the Football Program at Ohio State. Over the years, we have worked hard to educate and remind our coaches and players of the seriousness of relationship violence. I understand my lack of more action in this situation has raised concerns about this commitment. I once again apologize for this, and I extend my empathy to all women, men and families who are affected by relationship violence. This has been a real learning experience for me. I fully intend to use my voice more effectively to be a part of the solution.

Let me say here and now what I should have said on Wednesday: I sincerely apologize to Courtney Smith and her children for what they have gone through.

Summary of Investigative Findings and University Actions

Ohio State University

1. The Board of Trustees appointed a Special, Independent Working Group (“Working Group”) to oversee an independent investigation of allegations that Coach Urban Meyer failed to act appropriately regarding alleged abuse by Zach Smith of his former wife and related allegations that he misrepresented his knowledge of the alleged events at the Big Ten Media Days.

2. The Working Group included three Trustees of Ohio State: Janet Porter, Alex Fischer and Alex Shumate. The Working Group also included three prominent non-Trustees: JoAnn Davidson, former Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives; Craig Morford, former Acting Deputy U.S. Attorney General, and Carter Stewart, Esq., former United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. The University thanks each of these six individuals for the many hours they have spent reviewing these issues in the last two weeks.

3. The Trustees retained Mary Jo White, Esq., former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York and former Chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as her law firm, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, to conduct a detailed investigation of the allegations (the “Independent Investigatory Counsel”). Ms. White and her firm were selected because of their unquestioned independence and their expertise in prior investigations of this nature. Ms. White and her partner, David Sarratt, led the investigation.

4. In undertaking their review, the Independent Investigatory Counsel interviewed more than 40 witnesses, some multiple times. They reviewed over 60,000 e-mails and 10,000 text messages, in addition to relevant media reports, police reports, court filings, the employment contracts of Coach Meyer and Athletic Director Smith, and relevant OSU rules and policies, NCAA and Big Ten rules, and applicable state and federal laws.

5. Upon completion of the Independent Investigatory Counsel’s work, the Working Group received their report, found it to be complete, professional and credible, and formally accepted it.

6. Key findings from the independent review:

A. On the University’s overriding concern of assuring that spousal abuse is neither ignored nor condoned, the findings are: Coach Meyer has “a sincere commitment to the Respect for Women core values that he espouses and tries to instill in his players.” The Independent Counsel also concluded that Coach Meyer would not hesitate to terminate any coach if spousal abuse was established:

“We believe [Coach Meyer] as did Zach Smith, that if [Coach Meyer] ever came to learn or believe that Zach Smith had physically abused his wife, Coach Meyer would have fired Zach Smith or any other coach on the spot.”

B. Although Coach Meyer and Athletic Director Smith failed to adhere to the precise requirements of their contracts when they concluded that they needed to await a law enforcement determination to file charges before they reported the otherwise disputed claims of spousal abuse against Zach Smith, they did so based upon a good faith belief that they did not have sufficient information to trigger a reporting obligation or initiate a disciplinary action in the absence of law enforcement action. Other than their misunderstanding of the requirements triggering reporting obligations, neither Coach Meyer nor Athletic Director Smith violated any policy, rules, law or contractual obligation in connection with the alleged domestic abuse claims against Zach Smith.

C. A number of the other witnesses who were interviewed had the same understanding as that of Coach Meyer and Athletic Director Smith as to the events required to trigger University reporting obligations. The University therefore will undertake steps to make its requirements clearer and implement additional training to reinforce them.

D. Although Coach Meyer made significant misstatements about his knowledge of the 2015 events relating to Zach Smith and his former wife at the Big Ten Media Days, they were not part of a deliberate cover-up effort to keep Zach Smith on the coaching staff in the face of evidence of domestic violence by him that Athletic Director Smith and Coach Meyer credited.

E. The investigation identified multiple other examples of inappropriate conduct by Zach Smith while employed as an assistant football coach, some known by Coach Meyer and/or Gene Smith and others on the football staff. Coach Meyer and Athletic Director Smith’s efforts to help Zach Smith overcome his personal issues went too far in allowing him to remain as an employee in the face of repeated misconduct.

7. University actions based upon the independent review:

The President and the members of the Board of Trustees of the University have received the Report of the Independent Investigation and find it to be complete, professionally done and credible. The President has consulted with the Board of Trustees and based upon these independent findings, the University accepts the findings of the report and, based on them, takes the following action:

Although neither Urban Meyer nor Gene Smith condoned or covered up the alleged domestic abuse by Zach Smith, they failed to take sufficient management action relating to Zach Smith’s misconduct and retained an Assistant Coach who was not performing as an appropriate role model for OSU student-athletes. Permitting such misconduct to continue is not consistent with the values of the University and reflects poorly on Coach Meyer, Athletic Director Smith, and the University. Their handling of this matter did not exhibit the kind of leadership and high standards that we expect of our Athletic Director, Head Coach, Assistant Coaches and all on the football staff. Urban Meyer is suspended through September 2, 2018, and for the games on September 1, 8 and 15 without pay. Gene Smith is suspended without pay from August 31-September 16.

Ohio State receiver Terry McLaurin is lifted in celebration by teammate Jaylen Harris after scoring a touchdown against Oregon State during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121289200-4d6924bc714c46d19e4a212d7e56cc10.jpgOhio State receiver Terry McLaurin is lifted in celebration by teammate Jaylen Harris after scoring a touchdown against Oregon State during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Ohio State defensive back Jeffrey Okudah, left, knocks the ball away from Oregon State wide receiver Timmy Hernandez during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121289200-4e86fea995bf4bf9ae11b3ba94e0bac5.jpgOhio State defensive back Jeffrey Okudah, left, knocks the ball away from Oregon State wide receiver Timmy Hernandez during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Ohio State running back Mike Weber scores a touchdown against Oregon State during the second half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State beat Oregon State 77-31. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121289200-28d1abee438343efb594925c66e32d9f.jpgOhio State running back Mike Weber scores a touchdown against Oregon State during the second half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State beat Oregon State 77-31. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Staff & Wire Reports