Pirates beat Reds, Votto swaps shirts


Staff & Wire Reports



Cincinnati Reds' Joey Votto singles off Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Trevor Williams in the top of the first inning during a baseball game in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Cincinnati Reds' Joey Votto singles off Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Trevor Williams in the top of the first inning during a baseball game in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)


Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Trevor Williams delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)


Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Matt Harvey delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)


Votto gets fan’s shirt, vote; Reds get 5-1 loss vs Pirates

By JOHN PERROTTO

Associated Press

Monday, September 3

PITTSBURGH (AP) — This trade was too good for Joey Votto to turn down.

The Cincinnati Reds star first baseman spotted a fan sitting along the first base line Monday at PNC Park wearing a T-shirt that read “Votto for President.” It was from a Nike promotional campaign in 2012 and Votto hadn’t kept any of the shirts.

Votto got the shirt, but wound up with little else, shut down by Trevor Williams and the Pittsburgh Pirates 5-1.

In the middle of the fourth inning, Votto walked over to the fan and asked for the shirt, offering an autographed jersey in return. The man agreed and the suddenly bare-chested fan and Votto exchanged first bumps along with Labor Day gifts.

“I was trying to find (the T-shirt) for a while and I was excited to see if I could trade a jersey for a shirt and he obliged,” Votto said.

“He was willing to take his shirt off in the middle of the stands and thanks to him for being willing to do that,” he said.

That was the highlight of the day for Votto, who went 1 for 4 and grounded into a double play as the Reds lost for the ninth time in 12 games.

Trevor Williams (12-9) continued his stretch of strong starts by pitching 6 2/3 scoreless innings. He allowed five hits while striking out four and walking one.

Williams improved to 6-2 with a 0.66 ERA in his last nine starts, giving up four runs in 54 2/3 innings. It was his ninth outing of at least five innings without allowing a run this season.

“It’s trusting my stuff and being able to put the fastball where I want to put it,” Williams said. “We go into every start knowing the fastball command is going to be there and everything comes off that. It’s fun to throw the ball to all four quadrants of the strike zone.”

Adam Frazier had career high-tying four hits, including a solo home run off Matt Harvey (6-8) in the first and a two-run single in the seventh that stretched the Pirates’ lead to 5-0. Frazier also had a double and three RBIs.

Pittsburgh’s Gregory Polanco and Cincinnati’s Scooter Gennett homered and had two hits each.

Polanco hit a two-run shot in the sixth inning that made it 3-0.

Gennett, the NL batting leader with a .320 average, broke up the Pirates’ shutout bid with a solo drive off Kyle Crick in the eighth. Gennett also doubled in the first inning, but Williams worked out of a second-and-third jam with one out by striking Eugenio Suarez and getting Scott Schebler to fly out.

“He’s kind of like the guy who can get you a stolen base when you need a stolen base,” Pittsburgh manager Clint Hurdle said of Williams. “He had four strikeouts today, but he can get you a punchout when you need a punchout.”

Harvey surrendered three runs and seven hits in six innings with three strikeouts and no walks.

“It was one of those (starts) where you look back and the numbers obviously don’t go with how the game went but two pitches definitely cost me,” Harvey said.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Pirates: C Elias Diaz (strained right hamstring) missed his third straight game.

TRAHAN DEBUT

Reds SS Blake Trahan was 1 for 3 in his major league debut, hitting a single off Williams in the seventh inning. He was promoted from Triple-A Louisville on Saturday.

UP NEXT

Reds: LHP Cody Reed (0-1, 3.26 ERA) will make his third start and 13th relief appearance of the season Tuesday night after limiting Milwaukee to one run in 4 2/3 innings in his last outing.

Pirates: RHP Joe Musgrove (5-8, 3.80 ERA) is 1-4 in his last six starts despite a 3.65 ERA.

More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

The Conversation

Serena Williams’ catsuit controversy evokes the battle over women wearing shorts

September 5, 2018

Author

Deirdre Clemente

Associate Professor of History, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Disclosure statement

Deirdre Clemente does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners

University of Nevada, Las Vegas provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

At the French Open, Serena Williams wore a custom-made black catsuit. On August 24, the president of the French Tennis Federation said the outfit “wouldn’t be back.” It “went too far,” he continued. It didn’t “respect the game and the place.”

Among Williams’ defenders, the pushback was swift – the decision indicative of how female athletes face more scrutiny and are held to outdated dress standards.

As a historian of the American fashion industry, I’m not surprised when an outfit worn by a female athlete generates outrage. I thought of Suzanne Lenglen, the French tennis star of the late 1910s who shocked onlookers with her knee-length tennis dress. Coincidentally, Stade Roland Garros, the stadium where Serena wore her suit during the French Open, has a court named after Lenglen.

This is simply the most recent chapter of a century-long debate over the place of informality and immodesty in our dress: how short can that skirt be? Should the first lady be able to don a tank top? What about wearing sneakers to prom?

Sportswear, which can be both informal and immodest, has served as a flashpoint in these debates – particularly for women.

In 1936, a sportswriter named Paul Gallico argued that female athletes and their clothing were offensive.

Women who play sports, he wrote, “stick out places when they play, wear funny clothes, get out of breath or perspire.” He didn’t like that because “it’s a lady’s business to look beautiful, and there are hardly any sports in which she seems able to do it.”

Nothing, it seemed, offended people off more than women in shorts. Starting in the late 1920s, shorts became the much-contested replacement for bloomers, the puffy-legged, bifurcated garment worn under long skirts. Women who did wear athletic garb were supposed to keep out of the public eye because it was deemed unfeminine and, yes, immodest.

Female tennis players were on the frontlines of the battle for public acceptance of shorts. Even though tennis industry officials and country club muckety mucks wrote dress codes that outlawed shorts, many women refused to adhere to the rules and continued showing up to play wearing them.

Some were thrown off the courts. But it’s hard to enforce dress codes when everybody’s doing it.

Not surprisingly, this really rankled the old guard.

“If you gals really knew how cute you look in a well-cut dress, you wouldn’t hanker to wear shorts,” one etiquette writer grumbled in the 1936 book, “Co-Ediquette: Poise and Popularity for Every Girl.” “Of course, you’ve got to be comfortable, ah, me! Even if you have to insult the aesthetic sense of men to do it?”

Most women shrugged – and kept on wearing shorts, on and off the court.

In time, shorts as hiking wear, shorts as gardening garb and shorts as loungewear became increasingly common. It seems the old guard had been worn down – or simply died off.

By the end of the 1930s, younger women were acknowledging a shift in attitudes. “American women live 24 hours a day in sports clothes,” one college student told the Boston Post. “Husband no longer come home and deliver stern lectures upon finding their wives cooking supper in shorts. It’s just taken for granted.”

While some husbands may have skipped the stern lectures, it took three more decades for shorts to fully reach widespread acceptance.

But in tennis, notions of immodesty and informality die hard. When female tennis players such as Billie Jean King wore very short, gored skirts and sleeveless polo shirts in the 1970s, they were criticized for their “radical” outfits. Time and again, the powers-that-be in tennis push back on immodesty, and the players push forward towards personal choice and – dare we say – personal style.

So, we’ve seen this all before. New stuff – never-seen-before stuff – has long spelled trouble for female athletes and sparked public outcry.

Today, the sartorial standards of what you can and can’t wear in certain settings have changed so radically that institutions can’t keep up. You almost feel sorry for the French official who announced the ban on the catsuit. In the big picture, he won’t do anything to stop the crawl of social change.

And how did Serena Williams respond to being chastised for wearing her black catsuit?

She simply showed up a few days later to win U.S. Open matches wearing a tulle tutu.

The CSO’s Concerts for Kids to Celebrate Halloween with MONSTER BOOGIE October 14

As part of the CSO’s Concerts for Kids series, newly appointed Assistant Conductor Andrés Lopera will conduct the Columbus Symphony in “Monster Boogie,” a special Halloween-themed, hour-long concert for kids aged 2-10. The concert will include themes from popular Hollywood films such as Pirates of the Caribbean, Star Wars, and Ghostbusters as well as spooky classical music favorites. Families are invited to dress up in their ghoulish best and compete for prizes in pre-concert Halloween costume contests, plus vote for their favorite CSO musician costume.

Pre-concert activities will begin at 2pm in the Ohio Theatre lobby, and will include:

  • “Monster Mash” dance area
  • Instruments to see and play from the Loft Violin Shop and Music & Arts
  • Crafting with the Columbus Museum of Art
  • Conducting lessons with the CSO’s principal cellist Luis Biava
  • Musical fun with WeJoySing
  • Temporary musical tattoos
  • Meet the CSO’s mascot Bee-thoven and Mr. Sunny from Sunny 95!

Outside the Ohio Theatre:

  • Graeter’s ice cream truck

The Columbus Symphony’s Concerts for Kids presents “Monster Boogie” at the Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.) on Sunday, October 14, at 3pm. Recommended for ages 2-10, the concert will last approximately one hour. Tickets are $12.50 for adults and $8.50 for children, and can be purchased at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

www.columbussymphony.com

CALENDAR LISTING

The Columbus Symphony’s Concerts for Kids presents MONSTER BOOGIE

Sunday, October 14, 3pm

Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.)

Break out your Halloween costumes and join the ghoulishly-dressed Columbus Symphony for a frightfully fun, hour-long concert of “boo-tiful” music specially programmed for kids aged 2–10. Enjoy costume contests with prizes, trick-or-treating, and lots of fun, pre-concert Halloween activities beginning at 2pm in the Ohio Theatre lobby. Tickets are $12.50 for adults and $8.50 for children, and can be purchased at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), all Ticketmaster outlets, and www.ticketmaster.com. To purchase tickets by phone, please call (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.columbussymphony.com

The 2018-19 season is made possible in part by state tax dollars allocated by the Ohio Legislature to the Ohio Arts Council (OAC). The OAC is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally, and economically. The CSO also appreciates the support of the Greater Columbus Arts Council, supporting the city’s artists and arts organizations since 1973, and the Kenneth L. Coe and Jack Barrow, and Mr. and Mrs. Derrol R. Johnson funds of The Columbus Foundation, assisting donors and others in strengthening our community for the benefit of all its citizens.

About the Columbus Symphony Orchestra

Founded in 1951, the Columbus Symphony is the only full-time, professional symphony in central Ohio. Through an array of innovative artistic, educational, and community outreach programming, the Columbus Symphony is reaching an expanding, more diverse audience each year. This season, the Columbus Symphony will share classical music with more than 200,000 people in central Ohio through concerts, radio broadcasts, and special programming. For more information, visit www.columbussymphony.com.

Husted Declares September As “Agriculture” Month

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

COLUMBUS – Secretary of State Jon Husted has announced August as “Agriculture” Month. Throughout the month, Ohio Business Profile will highlight a series of businesses who are helping to make agriculture a cornerstone of Ohio’s economy.

“Not only is agriculture a huge industry in the State of Ohio, but it’s also a vital part of our culture,” Secretary Husted said. “Growing up in rural northwest Ohio, I learned the values of hard work and family that were nurtured by farmers throughout the community.”

Businesses profiled this month include:

  • Brighton Wool & Honey Co. (Grafton, Ohio) specializes in honey, wool, and all-natural handmade soap. Their priority is to ensure their products are pure, nourishing, and environmentally friendly.
  • Buckeye Valley Beef Cooperative (Russellville, Ohio) prides itself by providing naturally raised beef that is safe, local, and healthy. Handling their product from start to finish helps them with quality control, while also providing excellent customer service.
  • Graminex, LLC (Deshler, Ohio) specializes in the harvest and production of non-solvent Flower Pollen Extract. Their research and development team works closely with a variety of partners to create unique formulas that target some of the world’s major health problems.
  • Harrison Farm, LLC (Groveport, Ohio) provides its community with opportunities to learn about animal agriculture, while also offering a place where guests can enjoy and appreciate the peace that farmland presents.
  • Seven Grains Natural Market (Tallmadge, Ohio) started in 1998 as a small farm market with a simple goal – to offer natural, organic foods at prices the average family can afford. Over the past two decades, Seven Grains has evolved into a full-scale market boasting a large selection of organic wine and a huge stock of gluten-free, vegetarian, and vegan food options.
  • Sunshine Acres Lavender Farm (Morrow, Ohio) took root in 2014 and is now a thriving micro-farm. Based on seven acres of land, the farm now features chickens, goats, and sprawling lavender plants. The rustic, natural environment has become a popular location for photographers looking to capture the beauty of the outdoors.
  • The Quarry Farm (Pandora, Ohio) is committed to helping people of all ages to increase their understanding of northwest Ohio’s natural environment. Located in Putnam County, the farm provides visitors an opportunity to interact with their fellow inhabitants in a sustainable manner. This is achieved through a series of educational programs both on and off-site.

In January, Secretary Husted announced that 2017 was a record-breaking year for new businesses formed in the Buckeye State. This marks the eighth consecutive year Ohio has seen a record number of new entities file to set up shop.

Since taking office in 2011, Secretary Husted has made it a priority to offer better services to Ohio entrepreneurs and businesses at a lower cost. In 2013, he launched Ohio Business Central, which allows businesses to be created online with a significantly quicker turnaround time. This efficiency allowed the state to cut the fees associated with starting a new business by 21 percent in 2015. That same year, Secretary Husted began a partnership with Google’s “Let’s Put Our Cities on the Map” program making it easy for new businesses to access free tools to help them get off the ground.

Ohio Business Profile was launched in 2011 to highlight Ohio companies that create transformative products, offer outstanding service, contribute to their local communities and employ Ohioans. Each month, a handful of diverse businesses linked together by a common theme are featured on the Secretary of State’s website. Ohioans are encouraged to submit companies they feel are deserving of recognition in future months.

Patrol Reports Fewer Fatal Crashes for Labor Day Holiday

Ohio State Highway Patrol

September 4, 2018

OVI arrests and seatbelt citations increase

COLUMBUS – The Ohio State Highway Patrol is reporting 13 fewer traffic fatalities over the Labor Day Holiday as compared to last year, according to provisional data.

There were 11 fatal crashes which claimed 11 lives – a decrease from 2017 when 22 fatal crashes killed 24 people. Alcohol was a contributing factor in at least two fatalities. Additionally, four motorcyclists were not wearing a helmet and one motorist was not wearing a safety belt.

Troopers arrested 894 drivers for OVI and issued 7,151 safety belt citations, both increases over 2017. Troopers also made 509 drug arrests and 164 felony apprehensions.

A total of 35,019 traffic enforcement stops were conducted along with 17,486 non-enforcement stops. Troopers also provided assistance to motorists 3,617 times. The Labor Day reporting period began Friday, August 31 at 12 a.m. and ended Monday, September 3 at 11:59 p.m.

Cincinnati Reds’ Joey Votto singles off Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Trevor Williams in the top of the first inning during a baseball game in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121289209-015185c2471d46ce9e399e4a3ee064e5.jpgCincinnati Reds’ Joey Votto singles off Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Trevor Williams in the top of the first inning during a baseball game in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Trevor Williams delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121289209-4d0912cfe1964e5cabda964d41277add.jpgPittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Trevor Williams delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Matt Harvey delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/09/web1_121289209-9a6398897fc449f5b14f2f3b0af9d328.jpgCincinnati Reds starting pitcher Matt Harvey delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Pittsburgh, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Staff & Wire Reports