Packer fullback dies


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FILE - In this Nov. 22, 1962, file photo, Green Bay Packers fullback Jim Taylor (31) is brought down by Detroit Lions' Dick Lane in the third quarter of an NFL football game in Detroit. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83.  (AP Photo/Preston Stroup, File)

FILE - In this Nov. 22, 1962, file photo, Green Bay Packers fullback Jim Taylor (31) is brought down by Detroit Lions' Dick Lane in the third quarter of an NFL football game in Detroit. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83. (AP Photo/Preston Stroup, File)


FILE - In this Dec. 13, 1962, file photo, Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi, left, congratulates fullback Jim Taylor in Long Beach, Calif., after Taylor learned he had been named played of the Year in the National Football League by an Associated Press Committee. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, OC.t 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83. (AP Photo/DFS, File)


FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2009, file photo, Hall of Famer Jim Taylor, from the Green Bay Packers, walks the Vince Lombardi Trophy, through the Pro Football Hall of Fame after it was delivered by a Brinks armored car in Canton, Ohio. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83. (Scott Heckel/The Canton Repository via AP, File)


Jim Taylor, fierce fullback for mighty Packers, dies at 83

By GENARO C. ARMAS

AP Sports Writer

Sunday, October 14

Jim Taylor, the ferocious Hall of Fame fullback who embodied the Green Bay Packers’ unstoppable ground game during the Vince Lombardi era and helped the team win four NFL titles and the first Super Bowl, died Saturday. He was 83.

He died unexpectedly at a hospital in his hometown of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the team said.

Taylor played on the great Packer teams and was the league’s MVP in 1962. He scored the first rushing touchdown in Super Bowl history.

“He was a gritty, classic player on the Lombardi teams and a key figure of those great championship runs,” Packers President Mark Murphy said of the player who left his mark on “multiple generations of Packers fans.”

Taylor was voted into the Hall in 1976. David Baker, president of the Hall, lauded Taylor for not only personifying Lombardi’s “run to daylight” philosophy but for living his life as he played game, with “passion, determination and love for all he did.”

Taylor spent 10 seasons in the NFL after being drafted in the second round out of LSU in 1958. He joined a backfield that featured Paul Hornung and began to thrive when Lombardi took over in 1959.

Lombardi devised the Packers’ “Sweep,” which featured pulling guards Jerry Kramer and Fuzzy Thurston clearing the path for Taylor or Hornung running around the end. The 6-foot, 216-pound Taylor best fulfilled the play’s punishing effectiveness, a workhorse always charging forward, dragging would-be tacklers along.

“He taught me lots of character, and virtues, and principles,” Taylor said of Lombardi, with whom he occasionally feuded, in a 2001 interview with the Pro Football Hall of Fame. “He established a caliber of football that he felt like would be championship.”

In 1960, Taylor ran for 1,101 yards, topping Tony Canadeo’s franchise mark of 1,052 yards in 1949. It was just the beginning. He Taylor ran for five straight 1,000-yard seasons from 1960-64 and led the Packers seven consecutive times in rushing.

In 1961, Taylor ran for 1,307 yards and scored an NFL-best 15 touchdowns as the Packers rolled to a 37-0 victory over the Giants in Green Bay for Lombardi’s first title.

The next year would be Taylor’s finest. He ran for 1,474 yards and 19 TDs in 14 games, and scored the only touchdown in the Packers’ 16-7 victory over the New York Giants for the second of his four titles.

Taylor said that season, when Green Bay finished 13-1 in the regular season, stood out for him.

“Being voted the MVP of the league in 1962 is something that I look back and cherish,” Taylor said. “I felt like I accomplished and achieved my goal.”

The 1962 title game pitted the Packers and the Giants, this time in New York, and was played in 40 mph winds and 13-degree temperatures at Yankee Stadium.

Taylor was at his toughest, picking up 85 yards on 31 carries against the vaunted Giants defense featuring linebacker Sam Huff. Taylor sustained a gash to his elbow that required seven stitches at halftime and cut his tongue during the game.

“If Taylor went up to get a program, Huff was supposed to hit him. Wherever Taylor went, Huff went with him,” Kramer told The Associated Press in 2008. “I remember sitting next to Jimmy on the way home and he had his topcoat on. He never took it off. He had it over his shoulder and the guy was shivering almost all the way home. He just got the hell beat out of him that day.”

That game was one of several that helped launch pro football into the television era, and Taylor’s contributions to the Packers endured.

Taylor, also a member of the 1965 title team, finished his Packers career after the 1966 season as the franchise’s all-time leading rusher and held single-season marks for yards and TDs. He also scored the Super Bowl’s first rushing touchdown when the Packers defeated the Kansas City Chiefs 35-10 in the inaugural championship game between the NFL and AFL.

But his yardage tailed off sharply in 1966 and he was openly resentful of the high salaries paid to newcomers Donny Anderson and Jim Grabowski. Taylor played his final season with the expansion New Orleans Saints.

His 1,474-yard mark from 1962 stood for 41 years until Ahman Green broke it in 2003. Green went on to break the franchise’s all-time rushing mark in 2009.

In college, Taylor stayed home to attend LSU, where he lettered in the 1956 and 1957 seasons. He was a first-team All-American during his second season, when he also became teammates with Billy Cannon, who died last May. Taylor led Southeastern Conference in scoring with 59 points in 1956.

“With the ball under his arm, Jimmy Taylor is the finest player I have ever seen,” then-LSU coach Paul Dietzel said.

Taylor retired to Baton Rouge and remained close to the LSU football program. He was inducted in the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 1974.

He was a familiar presence at LSU football and basketball games. Athletic director Joe Alleva called Taylor the “ultimate LSU guy” who “bled purple and gold as well as Green Bay green and gold.”

Taylor was often compared to his contemporary, Cleveland’s Jim Brown, but Lombardi had different views on two of the most punishing running backs in the league at the time.

“Jim Brown will give you that leg (to tackle) and then take it away from you,” Lombardi said. “Jim Taylor will give it to you and then ram it through your chest.”

AP Sports Writer Brett Martel in Baton Rouge contributed to this report.

ICYMI in NFL Week 6: Mark your calendar for Brady-Mahomes II

By HOWARD FENDRICH

AP Pro Football Writer

Monday, October 15

Anyone who missed the Game of the Season — Tom Brady and the New England Patriots 43, Pat Mahomes and the Kansas City Chiefs 40 — can take solace in knowing there very well could be a rematch a little more than three months away.

And no one, except for players on other AFC teams, would be disappointed if Jan. 20 brings the world Patriots vs. Chiefs II, with a conference title and Super Bowl berth at stake.

“I’m sure,” Patriots linebacker Dont’a Hightower said about Mahomes, “we’ll probably see him down the road.”

Brady’s take on the KC QB who gave coach Bill Belichick’s defense all it could handle?

“Big play after big play.”

That’s an apt description of the whole contest Sunday night.

“It was a spectacle, that’s for sure,” Patriots receiver Josh Gordon said.

Just the sort of thing the NFL wants nowadays.

Supremacy of offense.

All attention on the passers and their targets.

Plenty of points and ever-increasing fantasy numbers.

Brady was 24 for 35 for 340 yards, one TD pass, one TD run, and a 39-yard completion to tight end Rob Gronkowski, whose 500th catch in the league set up Stephen Gostkowski’s go-ahead field goal on the final play. That came after Mahomes — 23 for 36 for 352 yards, four touchdown passes, a pair of picks — found Tyreek Hill for a tying 75-yard score.

The Chiefs (5-1) came back after trailing 24-9 at halftime.

The Patriots (4-2 and winners of three in a row) kept responding to every score Mahomes generated down the stretch.

The teams combined for 30 points in the fourth quarter alone.

It was back-and-forth. It was electrifying. It was memorable.

It was the 200th career regular-season victory for the 41-year-old Brady, a record for a starting quarterback.

It was the first career loss as an NFL starter for the 23-year-old Mahomes, who suddenly has become a bona fide star.

“He’s young,” said Hightower, who had an early interception, “but he definitely doesn’t show it.”

In case you missed it, here are other top topics after the NFL season’s sixth Sunday:

BACK TO THE BOOTH?

Jon Gruden’s return to the sideline from the TV booth continues to be an unmitigated disaster — on the field and off. His Oakland Raiders dropped to 1-5 by putting up little resistance in a 27-3 loss to the Seattle Seahawks. No one in the 32-team NFL has a worse record than the Raiders, whose only victory came against the Cleveland Browns. And no one has a worse point differential than Oakland, which has been outscored by 66 points after merely six games. There’s more, too. Gruden has been blasted for trading away elite linebacker Khalil Mack and had to answer questions after Sunday’s setback about a report that receiver Amari Cooper is available now.

SAD SACK

Never a good thing when a QB’s completion count is exceeded by the number of times he’s sacked, but that’s exactly what happened to Marcus Mariota in the Tennessee Titans’ 21-0 loss to Terrell Suggs and the Baltimore Ravens. Suggs had one of Baltimore’s 11 sacks, one shy of the NFL record. Mariota went 10 for 15 for 117 yards. “I can do a better job of stepping up in the pocket,” Mariota said. “I put our guys in a bad spot, trying to run around too much.”

‘WE WANT DALLAS!’

That was the familiar chant heard at Washington’s home stadium as its 23-17 victory over Cam Newton and the Carolina Panthers wound down. The Redskins (3-2) host the NFC East rival Cowboys (3-3) next week, and the matchup becomes a lot more intriguing thanks to what happened Sunday. Coaches Jay Gruden and Jason Garrett both were heavily criticized recently. Washington’s defense and Dallas’ offense were coming off problematic performances. And those units were both what generated victories, including Dak Prescott’s two-TD-pass, 82-yard-rushing showing as the Cowboys beat the Jacksonville Jaguars 40-7.

CATCH AS CATCH CAN

No NFL team wanted Adam Thielen coming out of college. And no NFL player ever started a season quite the way the Vikings’ undrafted receiver has this one. With 11 catches for 123 yards and a score in Minnesota’s 27-17 win against the Arizona Cardinals, Thielen raised his total to 58 catches, a league record through a half-dozen games. He’s also the first player in 57 years with at least 100 receiving yards in each of his club’s first six games.

AP Pro Football Writer Teresa M. Walker in Nashville, Tennessee, contributed to this report.

Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at http://twitter.com/HowardFendrich

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Bengals’ message: Don’t lose your cool against the Steelers

By JOE KAY

AP Sports Writer

Thursday, October 11

CINCINNATI (AP) — Coach Marvin Lewis routinely shows his Bengals players video of egregious conduct from around the league as a way of trying to keep them in line. Exhibit A would be their game last December against the Steelers.

The Bengals were penalized 13 times for a club-record 173 yards during another meltdown against Pittsburgh at Paul Brown Stadium. The Steelers overcame a 17-point deficit with the help of Cincinnati’s damaging penalties, finishing off a 23-20 victory that was their sixth in the row in the series.

Penalties have figured prominently in the streak, including penalties on Vontaze Burfict and Adam “Pacman” Jones that helped Pittsburgh pull out an 18-16 playoff victory in the 2015 season.

“We can’t have any dumb penalties, any outbursts, anything like that,” cornerback Dre Kirkpatrick said. “We’ve got to stay focused. It’s Pittsburgh week. Everybody’s going to be hyped up, ramped up.”

The AFC North rivalry has big implications for a mid-October game. The Bengals (4-1) are off to their best start since 2015, when they won the division, and could put some distance between themselves and the Steelers (2-2-1) . A loss would essentially even things up. The teams end the season with a game at Heinz Field.

For the Bengals, it’s about keeping their cool when tensions escalate.

“Every game I’ve been in against the Steelers, there’s been some type of aggressive hits or something dirty going on,” said receiver Tyler Boyd, who has played against his hometown team three times. “You can’t go out and play scared. You can’t go play frightened. You’ve just got to go out and hit. It’s hit or be hit.”

The Monday night game last December included nine major penalties and led to two suspensions.

William Jackson got an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty; Geno Atkins was flagged for roughing the passer; A.J. Green and Clayton Fejedelem got 15-yard facemask penalties; and George Iloka got an unnecessary roughness penalty for hitting Antonio Brown in the head. Iloka also got a one-game suspension that was reduced to a fine.

Pittsburgh’s Le’Veon Bell and Brian Allen were flagged for unnecessary roughness. JuJu Smith-Schuster got a 15-yard penalty for a blindside hit on Burfict, and another penalty for standing over the linebacker and talking trash. Smith-Schuster also got a one-game suspension.

Steelers linebacker Bud Dupree says there’s a difference between this rivalry game and all the others.

“Cincinnati game: I hit you as hard as I can, you hit me as hard as you can, but we’re going to talk trash after the play,” Dupree said. “It’s a real-life fight out there.”

Both Lewis and Steelers coach Mike Tomlin talked to their teams after the game last December, trying to rein in the conduct. Some Bengals veterans are reinforcing the message that they can’t let their emotions lead to another loss.

“The vets are going to be able to remind the young players of it — just talk about keeping your composure in games like this, things they probably did in college and big games, too,” defensive end Carlos Dunlap said.

Lewis reminded his team of penalties this week. Cincinnati was able to overcome a 17-0 deficit and beat the Dolphins 27-17 on Sunday in part because of Miami’s penalties. The Bengals’ first touchdown drive was aided by Martrell Spaight’s unsportsmanlike conduct penalty and an unnecessary roughness penalty on T.J. McDonald.

“That’s what the ramifications are — you’re hurting our opportunity to win,” Lewis said. “You’re really putting a dagger in our opportunity to win.”

NO GIO AGAIN: Running back Giovani Bernard was held out of practice again Thursday as he recovers from a knee injury, an indication he won’t be ready for the Steelers game. Bernard also sat out the win over Miami, putting the onus on Joe Mixon. Tight end Tyler Kroft also missed a second straight day of practice with a foot injury. Jackson (knee), receiver John Ross (groin) and offensive tackle Cedric Ogbuehi (wrist) were limited.

AP Sports Writer Will Graves contributed to this report.

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Browns’ defense forcing turnovers at rapid rate

By TOM WITHERS

AP Sports Writer

Thursday, October 11

BEREA, Ohio (AP) — The Miami Hurricanes invented the turnover chain. The Browns borrowed that idea.

They’ve been stealing everything else lately.

With eight interceptions and seven forced fumbles in just five games, Cleveland’s defense leads the NFL with 15 takeaways — two more than the Browns got during 16 games in their win-less 2017 season.

The dramatic swing has helped the Browns (2-2-1) turn things around quickly while breeding confidence into a getting-better-by-the-week team that feels like it can do much more than simply compete this season.

Creating turnovers has been a major emphasis of bombastic defensive coordinator Gregg Williams, who devotes large chunks of practice — Thursday’s workout has been dubbed “Takeaway Thursday” — to drills geared toward getting the football.

The Browns work on stripping it, tipping it, recovering it and doing anything in their power to gain possession. Then, they’re doing it in games.

“It is what you do as a professional,” said Pro Bowl linebacker Joe Schobert, who has two fumble recoveries and an interception. “You try to take stuff from the practice field to the game, apply it and be able to contribute and do it. The fact that we have been able to do it just shows how hard and how focused everybody on the defense has been this whole offseason and in training camp.

“We are just starting to see the rewards of our hard work.”

After finishing last in the league with a minus-28 turnover differential last season, the Browns are first at plus-8.

They opened the season by forcing six turnovers against Pittsburgh, but failed to capitalize and ended up tying the Steelers 21-21.

A plus-5 turnover differential almost always guarantees victory — teams with that margin are 132-4-1 since 1999. But although the Browns came up short, the defense’s showing created confidence.

“You just go into the game expecting to get turnovers,” said defensive back T.J. Carrie, part of Cleveland’s revamped secondary. “In this league, quarterbacks and coordinators are so good at not giving up turnovers. So when you can go in as a defensive unit and say, ‘We’re guaranteed three turnovers this game, guaranteed. Play the way we play. Play fast.’ That is contagious to the entire team.”

Rookie cornerback Denzel Ward has been Cleveland’s top defensive thief with three interceptions, two in Week 1. He’s also forced a fumble, recovered one and has given the Browns a defender that makes opponents wary.

As he prepared to face the Browns on Sunday, Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers took special note of Ward, the No. 4 overall pick in this year’s draft.

“He obviously has good ball skills,” Rivers said. “If he gets an opportunity, he has made the play on it. It seems to be clear on things, too, that he is pretty savvy back there for a young player. He is not just, ‘Oh, I am playing my coverage and I have my zone.’”

The excessive forced turnovers have led to a direct carry-over for Cleveland’s offense, which has been given better field position and more possessions.

Rookie quarterback Baker Mayfield said it’s imperative when the defense comes up with a big play, the offense follows with one of its own.

“We can really put a stamp on a game when the defense gets turnovers,” said Mayfield, who passed for 342 yards in his second career start last week. “We need to take advantage of when they do get those turnovers. We need to turn those into points and really take the life out of the other team. We just have to continue to feed off of that because it is very rare that you get a defense like that, that has 15 this early.”

The Browns’ burglary prompted linebacker Christian Kirksey to copy Miami’s sideline celebration by placing a silver chain with a dangling orange dog bone trinket around neck of any defender who makes a big play.

“It’s just something fun to do,” Kirskey said. “Having it around just bring a lot of chemistry for us.”

Right now, the Browns are thick as thieves.

NOTES: Offensive coordinator Todd Haley finally got to meet Snoop Dogg, who stopped in at Wednesday’s practice. A die-hard Steelers fan, the rapper had been very critical of Haley’s play calling when he coached in Pittsburgh. “We had a couple of rough years there,” Haley said. “It got smoother over the last few and then him being out there and saying that he is a part of the Dawg Pound, we are good now. I can go back to listening to West Coast rap.”

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Cowboys put focus on road woes after routing Jags at home

By SCHUYLER DIXON

AP Pro Football Writer

Monday, October 15

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Ezekiel Elliott had a quiet 100-yard game by his standards in the Dallas Cowboys’ rout of the Jacksonville Jaguars.

The star running back spoke the loudest after the 40-7 win on the home-road discrepancy for a .500 team that’s perfect at AT&T Stadium and winless with three mostly anemic offensive showings on the road.

Up next before Dallas’ open week: a trip to NFC East-leading Washington (3-2), a half-game ahead of the Cowboys and defending Super Bowl champion Philadelphia, tied at 3-3.

“Obviously it’s something we can do, but we need to do it,” Elliott, emphasizing “need,” said Sunday after rushing for 106 yards and a touchdown. “If we keep not winning on the road, we’re not going to make the playoffs.”

Dallas has three touchdowns on the road — one in each game. The Cowboys are averaging nearly 100 yards per game more at home than on the road, and the numbers are particularly stark in the first half.

At home, the Cowboys have a 210-125 edge in yardage before halftime compared to a 221-103 deficit at the break on the road. It’s not exactly the formula for taking a crowd out of the game.

“We’ve been a good road team in the past,” coach Jason Garrett said. “We have a young team. We have to understand how to handle the conditions on the road.”

After some pregame pumping up for Dallas from UFC star Conor McGregor , Cole Beasley had his first two touchdown catches of the season against the Jaguars.

Dak Prescott threw for 151 of his 183 yards before halftime and had 82 yards rushing, the second-best total for a quarterback in franchise history behind Roger Staubach’s 90 yards in 1971.

Prescott had two other career numbers: his longest run, a 28-yarder after escaping a sack, and his longest scoring run — from 17 yards after a fake to Elliott for Dallas’ first TD.

The 2016 NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year didn’t have to throw in the second half, so the team’s 30th-ranked passing game coming in couldn’t really be judged by another sub-200-yard game.

“I was talking to Dak the other day and we talked about how this game could set us up for the rest of the season,” said receiver Allen Hurns, who didn’t have a catch despite five targets. “We’ve still got to focus on trying to win on the road.”

Things to consider after the Jaguars (3-3) had season lows in total offense (204 yards) and yards rushing (65) while running just 47 plays to 72 for the Cowboys:

HOBBLED RUN GAME

Leonard Fournette’s availability with a balky hamstring will remain one of the big topics for Jacksonville, which is on its third left tackle in Josh Walker while All-Pro left guard Andrew Norwell has been a disappointment as a big-money free agent.

The Jaguars want to run — they’re 0-3 when they don’t get to 20 carries. Four-time All-Pro Jamaal Charles, unsigned before joining the Jaguars this past week, got a taste with five carries for 5 yards and a 5-yard catch. His role going forward will be something to watch. Starter T.J. Yeldon had 41 yards on just eight carries.

“We’re pretty banged up, but we’ve got guys that can play at any position,” said quarterback Blake Bortles, who was 15 of 26 for 149 yards after establishing career highs in yards passing the previous two weeks. “We expect a lot out of everybody out there.”

DALLAS D-LINE

The defensive front of the Cowboys is getting close to full strength, and could need the help with top pass rusher DeMarcus Lawrence trying to play through a shoulder injury.

Defensive tackle David Irving made his season debut after serving a four-game suspension and missing his first possible game for personal reasons. He had an early pressure on Bortles.

End Randy Gregory had his first sack since returning from substance-abuse suspensions that sidelined him for 30 of 32 games over two seasons. Gregory had a team-high three QB hits. Tackle Maliek Collins returned after missing three games with a knee injury and had his second sack of the season.

“With that particular lineup, it’s an unbelievable rush group,” owner Jerry Jones said.

EARLY GOOSE EGGS

Jacksonville is in a three-way tie for first in the AFC South with one of those teams, Houston, visiting Sunday. A good place for the Jaguars to start would be to start faster. They were outscored a combined 44-0 in the first half of losses to Kansas City and Dallas. The Cowboys scored on all four first-half possessions against the NFL’s No. 1 defense. “I’m going to figure it out, but it’s my job to make sure that our team comes out and they’re ready to play,” coach Doug Marrone said.

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FILE – In this Nov. 22, 1962, file photo, Green Bay Packers fullback Jim Taylor (31) is brought down by Detroit Lions’ Dick Lane in the third quarter of an NFL football game in Detroit. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83. (AP Photo/Preston Stroup, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/10/web1_121568506-8c1b9c30667a460ca90aa9b150433d6d-1.jpgFILE – In this Nov. 22, 1962, file photo, Green Bay Packers fullback Jim Taylor (31) is brought down by Detroit Lions’ Dick Lane in the third quarter of an NFL football game in Detroit. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83. (AP Photo/Preston Stroup, File)

FILE – In this Dec. 13, 1962, file photo, Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi, left, congratulates fullback Jim Taylor in Long Beach, Calif., after Taylor learned he had been named played of the Year in the National Football League by an Associated Press Committee. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, OC.t 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83.
(AP Photo/DFS, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/10/web1_121568506-fa2ed667074c4f34b82c3d14f08a2b5c-1.jpgFILE – In this Dec. 13, 1962, file photo, Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi, left, congratulates fullback Jim Taylor in Long Beach, Calif., after Taylor learned he had been named played of the Year in the National Football League by an Associated Press Committee. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, OC.t 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83.
(AP Photo/DFS, File)

FILE – In this Sept. 28, 2009, file photo, Hall of Famer Jim Taylor, from the Green Bay Packers, walks the Vince Lombardi Trophy, through the Pro Football Hall of Fame after it was delivered by a Brinks armored car in Canton, Ohio. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83. (Scott Heckel/The Canton Repository via AP, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/10/web1_121568506-4ea9f8fd68364406b7309429e2d72085-1.jpgFILE – In this Sept. 28, 2009, file photo, Hall of Famer Jim Taylor, from the Green Bay Packers, walks the Vince Lombardi Trophy, through the Pro Football Hall of Fame after it was delivered by a Brinks armored car in Canton, Ohio. The Hall of Fame fullback died early Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018, the Packers announced. He was 83. (Scott Heckel/The Canton Repository via AP, File)
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