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Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes smiles as he runs off the field after the team defeated the Cleveland Browns in an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)

Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes smiles as he runs off the field after the team defeated the Cleveland Browns in an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)


Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) attempts a two-point conversion as Kansas City Chiefs defensive end Allen Bailey (97) makes the tackle during the second half of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. The attempt failed. (AP Photo/David Richard)


Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes (15) passes the ball over Cleveland Browns defensive end Emmanuel Ogbah (90) during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)


Magic Mahomes: KC quarterback throws 3 TDs, Chiefs go to 8-1

By TOM WITHERS

AP Sports Writer

Monday, November 5

CLEVELAND (AP) — With almost every flick of his right wrist, the legend of Patrick Mahomes grows.

And he’s just beginning.

Only 10 games into his NFL career, Kansas City’s young quarterback is doing things that have never been done before.

Mahomes passed for 375 yards, threw three touchdown passes — two to Cleveland native Travis Kelce — and continued the best start by a QB in 68 years as Kansas City’s impossible-to-handle offense kept rolling with a 37-21 win on Sunday over the Cleveland Browns, who played their first game since coach Hue Jackson’s firing.

Kareem Hunt, who also has Cleveland connections, had two scoring runs and one receiving for the Chiefs (8-1), who came in averaging 36.3 points with an offense overloaded with weapons for Mahomes.

The 23-year-old used all of them in winning his first pro matchup against Baker Mayfield and the Browns (2-6-1).

“It’s a lot of fun,” said Mahomes, who was hurt by a couple drops. “It makes my job a lot easier knowing that I can trust these guys are going to be in the right spot. They’re taking care of their business. They’re running the routes and making route adjustments on the fly just because they’ve looked at the film and know how to do those things.”

Mahomes and Mayfield didn’t match their epic college meeting in 2016, when they combined for more than 1,700 yards in offense. But the Chiefs put on another impressive offensive show with 499 total yards, averaging 8.6 per snap.

Browns defensive end Myles Garrett said preparing for Mahomes and Kansas City’s air-and-ground show is nothing like playing against it.

“Their offense has a nice tempo and he gets the ball out of his hand pretty quick, so it’s hard to stop,” he said. “He spreads the ball around really well and everybody is getting touches. You don’t know who it’s going to go to next.”

In his second season, Mahomes, who made just one start as a rookie, already has 29 TD passes and 3,185 yards, the most by any QB through 10 games since 1950. He has passed for at least 300 yards in eight straight games.

“It’s a weird deal — he just goes out there and plays,” Chiefs coach Andy Reid said. “He works hard. He loves doing it. He just goes about his business the way that you’re supposed to do it.”

Cleveland lost its fourth straight, but it looked better under interim coach Gregg Williams than it did with Jackson, fired on Monday after going 3-36-1 in two-plus seasons.

Mayfield threw two TD passes to Duke Johnson and finished 29 of 42 for 297 yards with one interception.

The Browns came in facing a monumental task in trying to slow Mahomes and an offense with speed, depth and no noticeable weaknesses.

Things got much tougher for Cleveland when starting cornerback Damarious Randall (groin) was scratched and E.J. Gaines (concussion) and rookie Denzel Ward (hip) both got hurt in the first half.

Kansas City scored a touchdown on its first three possessions and the Chiefs only had the ball for 11:29 in the first half as the Browns were able to control the clock.

The Chiefs picked up where they left off in the third quarter with Mahomes firing a 13-yard TD pass to Kelce, giving Kansas City a 28-15 lead.

Kelce couldn’t stop smiling as he talked about his QB.

“You mean Showtime Mahomes?” he said. “He came in with the understanding this thing could be very special. We added a few pieces to the puzzle and the offensive line is playing lights out. It’s a combination of everything that’s making him feel comfortable out there.”

MAYFIELD HEAD SHOT

Mayfield was checked for a concussion and cleared after a questionable hit late in the third quarter.

Mayfield was backpedaling and being wrapped up by Chris Jones when the rookie QB was struck in the helmet by Chiefs defensive back Ron Parker, who came in late but was not penalized. The NFL’s on-site medical spotter called down and Mayfield had to leave the game to be checked for a head injury.

“I think the rule is if they see me messing with my helmet, they are going to take precaution,” Mayfield said. “When you get hit in the head, your helmet moves around so I am going to shift it so it fits correctly. It is just interesting how it works. I had to come out of the game and take the exam.”

LUCKY STREAK

The Chiefs won the coin toss for the ninth consecutive week and elected to defer.

HOMETOWN HERO

A Cleveland native, Hunt bought more than 100 tickets for the game and had them given to the players and coaches at his high school alma mater.

“It’s a dream come true that I’m able to do something like that,” said Hunt, who rushed for 91 yards. “It’s a stadium I used to drive by almost every day.”

LINE SHIFT

Browns rookie left tackle Desmond Harrison sat out with an unspecified illness and was replaced by Greg Robinson, a former No. 2 overall pick who made his first start.

UP NEXT

Chiefs: Host Arizona on Nov. 11

Browns: Host Atlanta on Nov. 11.

More AP NFL coverage: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

Ohio’s Traditional Deer-Gun Hunting Season Begins Nov. 26

Youth-only weekend to be held Nov. 17-18

COLUMBUS, OH – Deer hunting is an extremely popular activity for sportsmen and women statewide, and Ohio’s white-tailed deer continue to provide hunters across the state with excellent opportunities for success as they head out into the field. Hunting remains the most effective management tool for maintaining Ohio’s healthy deer population, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

Wildlife Hotline

Hunters can contact the ODNR Division of Wildlife toll-free at 800-WILDLIFE (945-3543) with questions about hunting.

Special call center hours for the deer-gun seasons include:

10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 17, for youth deer-gun season;

12-5 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 25, before the start of deer gun season;

7 a.m.-7 p.m., Monday, Nov. 26, to Friday, Nov. 30, and

10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1, and 12-5 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 2, for deer-gun season.

Hunting Season Details, Dates, Hours and Bag Limits

Ohio’s annual youth white-tailed deer hunting season gives young hunters an early opportunity to pursue the state’s most popular big-game animal on Nov. 17-18, and it is open to hunters with a valid youth hunting license and a deer permit.

The deer-gun seasons run from Monday, Nov. 26, to Sunday, Dec. 2, and Dec. 15-16. Details about deer hunting rules are available in the 2018-2019 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations, where licenses are sold or at wildohio.gov. Only either-sex permits may be used after Sunday, Nov. 25, unless hunting in an ODNR Division of Wildlife authorized controlled hunt.

A new regulation for the 2018-2019 hunting season limits hunters to harvesting one antlerless white-tailed deer from public land per license year. In addition, antlerless deer may not be taken from public hunting areas from Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, through Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019. Authorized ODNR Division of Wildlife controlled hunts and controlled hunts occurring at specific Ohio State Parks properties are exempt from this regulation.

Deer bag limits are determined by county, and a hunter cannot exceed a county bag limit. The statewide bag limit is six deer. Hunters may harvest only one buck in Ohio, regardless of method of take or location. Hunting hours for all deer seasons are 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset.

Poacher Hotline

Ohioans are encouraged to help enforce state wildlife laws by reporting violations to the division’s Turn-In-a-Poacher (TIP) hotline by calling 800-POACHER (762-2437). The TIP program allows individuals to anonymously call toll-free to report wildlife violations. Tipsters may be eligible to receive a cash award.

Chronic Wasting Disease Monitoring and Possessing Deer Carcass from Outside Ohio

Hunters are reminded that portions of Holmes and Tuscarawas counties have been declared a Disease Surveillance Area (DSA) as part of Ohio’s ongoing efforts to monitor chronic wasting disease (CWD). A DSA was established in Salt Creek, Paint, Berlin, Walnut Creek and Clark townships in Holmes County, as well as Wayne and Sugar Creek townships in Tuscarawas County. Specific regulations apply to those hunting for deer within the DSA; hunters should visit wildohio.gov for more information.

Hunters harvesting deer within the DSA are required to bring their deer to a carcass inspection station for disease testing. Two locations have been designated as carcass inspection stations for the deer-gun seasons and the deer muzzleloader season. Both locations will be open and staffed from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. during the deer-gun and deer muzzleloader seasons.

Sugarcreek Village Hall, 410 S. Broadway St., Sugarcreek, 44681

Walnut Creek Township Garage, 2490 Township Road 414, Dundee, 44624

New carcass rules apply to Ohioans who plan to travel out-of-state to hunt any species susceptible to CWD. This includes white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, mule deer, elk, caribou and moose. No person is permitted to possess high-risk carcass parts of CWD-susceptible species from anywhere outside of Ohio, except when the carcass is in the following condition or the carcass consists only of the following parts:

De-boned meat;

Meat that is cut and securely and completely wrapped either commercially or privately with no part of the spinal column or head attached;

Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached;

Antlers;

Antlers attached to a skull cap from which all soft tissue has been removed;

Upper canine teeth from which all soft tissue has been removed;

Hides and capes without any part of the head or lymph nodes attached; or

Finished taxidermy mounts.

Hunting Popularity

Ohio ranks fifth nationally in resident hunters and 11th in the number of jobs associated with hunting-related industries. Hunting has a more than $853 million economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food, lodging and more, according to the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s Hunting in America: An Economic Force for Conservation publication.

Deer Management Goals

The ODNR Division of Wildlife remains committed to properly managing Ohio’s deer populations. The goal of Ohio’s Deer Management Program is to provide a deer population that maximizes recreational opportunities, while minimizing conflicts with landowners and motorists.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.

2018 MAIN STREET DELAWARE AWARDS

Businesses, Organizations, Individuals Honored for Supporting Historic Downtown

DELAWARE, Ohio – Main Street Delaware is honoring several businesses, organizations, and individuals with 2018 awards for the positive impact they have made on the historic downtown and local community.

Main Street Delaware handed out 11 awards at its Oct. 30 recognition ceremony, held at Ohio Wesleyan University’s Richard M. Ross Art Museum.

“It’s an honor to recognize and thank our 2018 award-winners,” said Susie Bibler, Main Street Delaware’s executive direct. “This group of special individuals and businesses have made a positive impact on Main Street Delaware and our community selflessly contributing to the quality of live we all enjoy here.”

This year’s award recipients are:

Community Partner Award – Performance Chrysler Jeep Dodge Ram Delaware for a commitment to the downtown and community that includes sponsoring every First Friday celebration for the past two years. Accepting the award were Bruce Daniels and Denny Friermood.

Best Public/Private Partnership – Ohio Wesleyan, Delaware County, and the City of Delaware for the creation of The Delaware Entrepreneurial Center at Ohio Wesleyan University. The new facility, which opened in October, is a business accelerator and education center committed to improving the local economy and providing internships and learning opportunities for Ohio Wesleyan students. Accepting the award were OWU’s President Rock Jones and Megan Ellis, administrative director of The Woltemade Center for Economics, Business, and Entrepreneurship; County Commissioner Barb Lewis; and Assistant City Manager Jackie Walker.

Best Commercial Rehabilitation Award – The Oak & Brazen Wine Company. Owner Jeff Kirby was honored for overseeing efforts to transform an empty, neglected building into a beautiful, cozy venue that is quickly becoming a vibrant mainstay of the downtown.

Best Public Building Rehabilitation – Delaware County for its $39.2 million, 94,450-square-foot Courthouse building project that now houses the Court of Common Pleas, Domestic Relations Court, and Clerk of Courts as well as offices for probation officers and public defenders. The award was accepted by Commissioner Lewis and Facilities Director Jon Melvin.

Best Upper Floor Residential Rehabilitation Award – Denny Bolton and Kreg King for their work to transform the upper floor of 42 N. Sandusky Street, future home of Bolton Insurance.

Spirit of Main Street Award – Nicole Fowles for her ongoing work to support Main Street Delaware and improve the downtown. Fowles is a former president of the Main Street Delaware Board of Directors and current member of its Organization Committee. Her many contributions are highlighted by her work to help create the Merchants and Muffins meetings and the Home for the Holidays weekend, now in its second year.

Business of the Year Award – The Greater Gouda for its deep commitment to Main Street Delaware and the community. Owners Terri and Mark Smiles and all of their employees are involved with Main Street projects and committees, including Promotions and Christmas committee activities. The Greater Gouda’s efforts helped Main Street to earn the Heritage Ohio Award for Best Committee Event with Home for the Holidays 2017. Accepting the Business of the Year Award were Terri and Mark Smiles, Josh Keefer, and Liz Moser.

Volunteer of the Year Award – Ashli Nixon for her many hours of work to help Main Street Delaware create and launch its new website and her ongoing work to help keep the site updated with fresh images and informative news.

Outstanding Leader Award – Cole Hatcher for his ongoing work to support Main Street Delaware, including more than a decade of service as both an elected and Ohio Wesleyan-appointed member of the Main Street Board of Directors. Hatcher is currently a member of Main Street’s Organization Committee. He is a former chair of the Promotions Committee and former Board vice president and secretary.

Preservation Hero Award – Roger Koch in recognition of his more than 40 year as a historic preservation champion in Central Ohio and, especially, Delaware. Koch has helped to secure inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places for 79 downtown Delaware structures and 510 Northwest Neighborhood buildings. In the 1990s, he purchased and renovated several downtown buildings, seeking tenants who would contribute to the vitality of downtown and, later, historically minded buyers. Koch served on the City of Delaware’s Historic Preservation Commission from 2002 through 2017 and has been active with Main Street Delaware since its inception.

Business Beacon Award – Fresh Start Café and Bakery and owners Todd and Leigh Daughenbaugh for their work to draw new media attention to downtown Delaware with “Experience Delaware,” a daylong tour of downtown businesses for more than 40 Central Ohio lifestyle and food bloggers, complete with goodie bags, lunch at various local restaurants, demonstrations throughout the day, and time to explore.

The 2018 awards ceremony was sponsored by TRIAD Architects and 2K General Company Inc. To learn more about Main Street Delaware and its upcoming events and volunteer opportunities, visit www.mainstreetdelaware.com or www.facebook.com/MainStreetDelaware.

About Main Street Delaware:

Main Street Delaware is a 501(c)(3) member-supported organization. In addition to coordinating the First Friday celebrations and downtown Farmers’ Markets, Main Street Delaware oversees the holiday parade, Christmas tree lighting, and more. Main Street Delaware is an accredited Ohio Main Street Community. For additional information, contact Susie Bibler, executive director, at 740-362-6050 or director@mainstreetdelaware.com. Learn more at www.mainstreetdelaware.com or www.facebook.com/MainStreetDelaware.

Patrol’s Sergeant Thompson promoted to Lieutenant in the Office of Logistics and Security Services

Columbus – Sergeant Merrill J. Thompson was promoted to the rank of lieutenant on October 21, 2018 and was recognized today by Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, during a ceremony at the Patrol’s Training Academy. Lieutenant Thompson will transfer from his current assignment at the Springfield Post to serve in the Office of Logistics and Security Services, HUB/Watch Desk.

Lieutenant Thompson began his Patrol career in September 2002 as a member of the 140th Academy Class. He earned his commission in February of the following year and was assigned to the Marysville Post. As a trooper, he also served on the Motorcycle Unit and at the Columbus Post. In 2013, he was promoted to the rank sergeant and transferred to the Springfield Post to serve as an assistant post commander. As a sergeant, he also served in the Office of Planning and Analysis.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is an internationally accredited agency whose mission is to protect life and property, promote traffic safety and provide professional public safety services with respect, compassion, and unbiased professionalism.

Patrol’s Trooper Kowicki promoted to Sergeant at the Akron Post

Columbus – Trooper Kaitlyn M. Kowicki was promoted to the rank of sergeant on October 28, 2018 and was recognized today by Colonel Paul A. Pride, Patrol superintendent, during a ceremony at the Patrol’s Training Academy. Sergeant Kowicki will transfer from her current assignment in the Office of Personnel, Recruitment to serve as an assistant post commander at the Akron Post.

Sergeant Kowicki began her Patrol career in September 2012 as a member of the 153rd Academy Class. She earned her commission in February of the following year and was assigned to the Canton Post. In 2014, she earned the Criminal Patrol Award. As a trooper, she also served at the Patrol’s Training Academy and in the Office of Personnel, Recruitment.

Sergeant Kowicki earned a Bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Youngstown State University in 2012.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is an internationally accredited agency whose mission is to protect life and property, promote traffic safety and provide professional public safety services with respect, compassion, and unbiased professionalism.

Community reflects as family closes beloved farm market

By HOLLY ZACHARIAH

Columbus Dispatch

Sunday, November 4

ASHVILLE, Ohio (AP) — As soon as David Renick spots a stranger headed straight for him, he lumbers away from his John Deere 4020 and the crates of pumpkins and gourds that surround him to extend a work-worn hand for a firm shake.

And then he almost immediately points out what kind of goodies one might find in the building that houses Renick’s Family Market behind him. He is partial to the blackberry and apple pies, and he highly recommends the pumpkin bread. But the goat’s milk fudge? Now, that’s not to be missed.

“I make that myself,” he said with a nod and a grin. “We use real goat milk and Amish butter. Hits the spot.”

And there, standing in the gravel parking lot on the very land where his late parents, Milton and Ruth Renick, opened a modest farmers market in 1959, he said he would leave work on Halloween with no regrets after rolling down those garage doors on their old building at the close of business for the last time. Renick’s — that always-bustling spot along Route 23 in northern Pickaway County where generations of families have taken their children to pick the perfect pumpkin, to get an apple cider slushie, to craft a life-sized scarecrow, to race through the corn maze — was closing for good.

“It is time,” David said simply. He and his wife, Linda, are both 70. They have four grown children and eight grandchildren, and their fifth great-grandchild was making his entrance into this world even as the couple spoke Tuesday about the importance of spending more time with family. They decided at some point in this 10-week season at the market that this would be their last.

“My dad had a favorite saying, ‘It’s better to wear out than to rust out,’” David said.

“And I was starting to rust,” Linda added with a laugh.

Standing inside the market that is practically a museum — antiques and family heirlooms cover every shelf and wall, including Grandma’s canning tins and canister sets and Linda’s father’s fishing gear — Ashley Estep tried to keep it together as she talked about the market closing.

“We’re just one big family,” Estep said, tearing up. “I love the Renicks. They are so special. I can’t imagine them — and this market — not being here. I just can’t.”

Having visited all the time as a child, her first job was running a cash register at the market at age 14. She is 30 now, and returns every season.

Renick’s was pretty much everyone’s first job around there, she said. Boys would generally be put to work in the 30-acre pumpkin patch, planting and hoeing and cutting stems. But then there also was asparagus to harvest and melons to raise and corn to pick and … well, you get the idea. Running the market and tending the acreage that supports it (the family has 500 acres here, and 280 up the road) is a lot of work.

And don’t even get Linda started about the baking. Tuesday afternoon, she and Estep took turns tending to the 28 pumpkin pies baking in the steel ovens in the back.

“We’ve had a lot of fun here, but it’s a lot of work,” said Linda’s best friend, Marty Adams, as she helped a customer choose the right variety of apples. “Dave and Linda? They deserve the break. It’s sad to close, but everyone is so happy for them to get to relax.”

It was difficult for anyone to get anything done Tuesday, as word had spread in the past couple of days that the market would close for good Wednesday. The phone hadn’t stopped ringing, and the parking lot had stayed mostly packed. New customers popped in to look for deals; regulars came by to reminisce.

“People keep saying, ‘We heard a rumor. Is it true?’” Linda said. “And then sometimes when we tell them it is, they cry.”

When asked what will become of the building, David and Linda replied in unison: “We don’t know.” What will they do with all that memorabilia? “We don’t know.”

But they do know this: The memories made here will sustain them. David and Linda each said their hearts are full of gratitude for the love they’ve felt from the customers all these years.

“They’ll have good memories, precious memories,” David said. “And so will we.”

Online: https://bit.ly/2ADnHaV

Information from: The Columbus Dispatch, http://www.dispatch.com

Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes smiles as he runs off the field after the team defeated the Cleveland Browns in an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121712287-b87f12a51869493b9a9870a2fce05814.jpgKansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes smiles as he runs off the field after the team defeated the Cleveland Browns in an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)

Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) attempts a two-point conversion as Kansas City Chiefs defensive end Allen Bailey (97) makes the tackle during the second half of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. The attempt failed. (AP Photo/David Richard)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121712287-9b2d196931224a379fa6d502d8302634.jpgCleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) attempts a two-point conversion as Kansas City Chiefs defensive end Allen Bailey (97) makes the tackle during the second half of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. The attempt failed. (AP Photo/David Richard)

Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes (15) passes the ball over Cleveland Browns defensive end Emmanuel Ogbah (90) during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121712287-67d298856b5645beae0a7b070f0771b5.jpgKansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes (15) passes the ball over Cleveland Browns defensive end Emmanuel Ogbah (90) during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)
Sports, News

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