Gymnastics marathon


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Simone Biles of the U.S. holds her silver medal after the women's uneven bars final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Championships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Simone Biles of the U.S. holds her silver medal after the women's uneven bars final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Championships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)


Gold medallist Simone Biles of the U.S. walks onto the podium of the women's vault final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Chamionships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)


Silver medallist Simone Biles of the U.S., left, gold medallist Belgium's Nina Derwael, center, and bronze medallist Germany's Elisabeth Seitz pose after the women's uneven bars final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Chamionships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)


Biles sets record by picking up 13th world championship gold

Saturday, November 3

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Simone Biles made history by picking up her record 13th career gold medal at the world gymnastics championships when she cruised to victory in the vault final on Friday.

Yet it’s the silver she captured on uneven bars that the Olympic and world champion may cherish more.

For years Biles viewed bars with a mixture of skepticism and scorn. There was a point in time she admits she would have been OK with taking a “chainsaw” to every bars set in the country.

Those days are over. Helped in part by the influence of new head coach Laurent Landi, Biles now considers the event a challenge more than a chore. Maybe that’s why the smile on the podium during the medal ceremony after she came in second to Belgium’s Nina Derwael was so wide.

“I’ve come a long way,” Biles said.

It certainly showed. Biles put together a score of 14.7 to edge Germany’s Elisabeth Seitz for silver. Belgium’s Nina Derwael won the first ever gold medal for her country at worlds when the judges awarded her daring and intricate set with a score of 15.2.

Not that Biles — who expressed frustration after a sloppy (by her standards) performance while winning a record fourth all-around title on Thursday — was complaining after finishing runner-up to Derwael. She became the first American woman to earn a world championship medal on all four events, and the way she’s focused on upping her degree of difficulty on bars is a testament to the way her approach has matured over the years.

“(Before) to even work and put that much effort into bars, I would have probably been like ‘No, No thank you,’” Biles said. “I really put the work and the effort to bring up that event to the level with the other (events).”

Events like vault, where Biles has long been among the best in the world. She easily captured gold even though she opted not to perform her new signature vault after she fell while trying to land in during the all-around final. She chose two slightly safer vaults instead, and her average of 15.366 was nearly a full point ahead of silver medalist Shallon Olsen of Canada and bronze medalist Alexa Moreno of Mexico.

Biles wanted to do her new vault — which she drilled in both qualifying and the team final and will be named after her when the code of points is updated — but Landi talked her out of it.

“He said, ‘You know what? You can’t change what happened yesterday,’” Biles said. “‘I know you really want to get out there and do that vault but you can’t change what happened yesterday and you’ve been successful at that vault while in training and on podium. So just go out there and do (another vault instead).”

The decision helped Biles boost her gold medal total at the world championships to 13, the most every by any gymnast. She will have a chance to add to her medal total when the meet wraps up on Saturday. Biles will compete in both the balance beam final and the floor exercise final. If she medals on both — as she did at the 2016 Olympics — the 21-year-old will tie the all-time mark for career medals at the world championships with 20.

Not bad considering she is dealing with a kidney stone that sent her to the emergency room on the eve of qualifying. Biles said the pain is manageable and she was more focused on simply trying to make up for her so-so all-around.

“I really wanted to come out here and redeem myself and I think I did that tonight,” Biles said.

Men’s all-around champion Artur Dalaloyan added gold on floor exercise, his score of 14.900 allowed him to slip past Japan’s Kenzo Shirai. Carlos Edriel Yulo of the Philippines was third, just ahead of American Yul Moldauer in fourth.

China’s Xiao Ruoteng, who lost gold in the all-around on a tiebreaker, won gold on pommel horse on a tiebreaker. Xiao and Max Whitlock of Britain both finished with a score of 15.166 but Xiao claimed gold because his execution score was higher than Whitlock’s. Lee Chih-Kai of Taiwan won the bronze, the first world championship medal for Taiwan in a quarter century. American Sam Mikulak was fourth.

Greece’s Eleftherios Petrounias captured gold on still rings with a score of 15.366. Brazil’s Arthur Zanetti took silver with Marco Lodadio of Italy claiming bronze.

The men finish up the meet with finals on vault, parallel bars and high bar on Saturday.

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Ethiopia’s Desisa, Kenya’s Keitany win NYC Marathon

By DENIS P. GORMAN

Associated Press

Sunday, November 4

NEW YORK (AP) — By the time Mary Keitany was pacing her way up Manhattan’s First Avenue, she had no reason to look back for challengers. The Kenyan’s lead was growing over the strong women’s field with every stride, and all she thought about was the finish line.

Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia didn’t break out into a big grin until he pulled away from two opponents late in the race.

In perfect crisp autumn weather for distance runners, Keitany and Desisa won the New York City Marathon on Sunday in near record times.

Keitany, 36, became the second woman to win the marathon four times. She ran the race in 2 hours, 22 minutes, 48 seconds, the second fastest time for the course in history. Margaret Okayo of Kenya set the record of 2:22:31 in 2003.

“I can say the course record was not in my mind,” Keitany said. “For me, winning was the most important.”

Desisa, 28, held off countryman Shura Kitata by 1.99 seconds for his first win in New York, joining victories at the Boston Marathon in 2013 and 2015. He finished second in New York in 2014 and third in 2015 and 2017.

“This is my dream,” Desisa said. “To be a champion.”

Desisa finished in 2 hours, 5 minutes, 59 seconds, the second fastest time for the course. Geoffrey Mutai of Kenya set the record of 2:05:05 in 2011. Last year’s winner, Geoffrey Kamworor of Kenya, finished third.

“I’m pretty happy to finish on the podium,” Kamworor said. “I came out the best that I could in the race. I tried my best, and I’m happy to be third.”

Keitany won in 2014, 2015 and 2016 before coming in second last year to Shalane Flanagan, the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. She joined Grete Waitz, the Norwegian who won the marathon nine times between 1978-1988, as the only women to win the marathon four times.

She and Ethiopians Rahma Tusa and Gudeta turned their race to a three-woman field at the 15-mile mark. Keitany pulled away from Tusa and Gudeta at the 19-mile mark, leading Tusa by 26.58 seconds and Gudeta by 43.98 seconds. She extended her lead over Tusa to 1:27.83 at the 21-mile mark.

From that point, the question was not whether Keitany would win. Rather, it was by how much.

She beat countrywoman Vivian Cheruiyot by 3 minutes, 13 seconds.

Flanagan finished third.

“You have to find motivation, things to focus on,” Flanagan said. “When I finally got to third place, I got another level of excitement because I was fighting.”

The United States had four women finish in the top 10: Molly Huddle was fourth, Desiree Linden was sixth and Allie Kieffer was seventh.

Four American men also finished in the top 10: Jared Ward was sixth, Scott Fauble was seventh, Shadrack Biwott was ninth and Chris Derrick was tenth.

Daniel Romanchuk became the first American to win the men’s wheelchair division, with a time of 1:36:21. Romanchuk finished 01.15 seconds ahead of Switzerland’s Marcel Hug. David Weir of Britain, American Aaron Pike and Australian Kurt Fernley rounded out the top five.

“I need air and I’m in pain,” said Romanchuk, a 20-year old from Champaign, Illinois, who won the Chicago Marathon last month. “It’s wonderful to be able to win my two Abbott major marathons on American soil. It’s an amazing experience.”

Manuela Schar of Switzerland repeated as winner of the women’s wheelchair division. Schar, who also won the Berlin and Chicago marathons, finished with a time of 1:50:27. American Tatyana McFadden finished second with a time of 1:50:48. Lihong Zou of China came in third. Eliza Ault-Connell of Australia and Margriet Van Den Broek of the Netherlands finished fourth and fifth.

“New York is always a really tough one for me because of the course,” Schar said. “I’m not really a good climber so I always have to work really hard in the flat part. Yeah (I) tried to make that ground that I lose in the hills. I’m always a bit more nervous before New York than before the other races.”

Retired NFL running back Tiki Barber finished the race in 4:44:47. He has run the marathon every year since 2014, with his best time being 4:28:26 in 2016. Actress Teri Hatcher recorded a time of 5:51:21 in her second marathon. In 2014, she compiled a time of 5:06:42.

Simone Biles of the U.S. holds her silver medal after the women’s uneven bars final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Championships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121705408-1fdd16039fa6477299c76bee77bf7afd.jpgSimone Biles of the U.S. holds her silver medal after the women’s uneven bars final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Championships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Gold medallist Simone Biles of the U.S. walks onto the podium of the women’s vault final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Chamionships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121705408-ebe7e15b4239405eb6349cf812ea2f33.jpgGold medallist Simone Biles of the U.S. walks onto the podium of the women’s vault final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Chamionships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Silver medallist Simone Biles of the U.S., left, gold medallist Belgium’s Nina Derwael, center, and bronze medallist Germany’s Elisabeth Seitz pose after the women’s uneven bars final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Chamionships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/11/web1_121705408-145534c2f58042c4a4c163d257aaa92b.jpgSilver medallist Simone Biles of the U.S., left, gold medallist Belgium’s Nina Derwael, center, and bronze medallist Germany’s Elisabeth Seitz pose after the women’s uneven bars final on the first day of the apparatus finals of the Gymnastics World Chamionships at the Aspire Dome in Doha, Qatar, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
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