Ohio briefs: New big man on campus


NEWS & VIEWS

Staff & Wire Reports



FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2018, file photo, Ohio State quarterback Tate Martell runs against Tulane during an NCAA college football game in Columbus, Ohio. Martell says he is transferring from Ohio State to Miami. Martell announced on Twitter early Wednesday, Jan. 16: “I’m a Hurricane.” Martell had entered his name into the NCAA transfer portal last week and was free to be approached by schools about a potential transfer. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)

FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2018, file photo, Ohio State quarterback Tate Martell runs against Tulane during an NCAA college football game in Columbus, Ohio. Martell says he is transferring from Ohio State to Miami. Martell announced on Twitter early Wednesday, Jan. 16: “I’m a Hurricane.” Martell had entered his name into the NCAA transfer portal last week and was free to be approached by schools about a potential transfer. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)


Miami QB Tate Martell arrives, says he’s ready to compete

By TIM REYNOLDS

AP Sports Writer

Thursday, January 17

DANIA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Tate Martell greeted a few well-wishers in the airport after arriving in South Florida, then stopped to pick up a coffee and a sandwich.

The baristas, noticing the crowd around him, asked his name.

If Martell gets his way, they’ll know his name — and his game — soon enough.

The former Ohio State quarterback is in the final stages of enrolling at Miami, arriving with four pieces of luggage on Thursday afternoon after flying in from Columbus to his new home. The plan is for him to complete his academic registration process no later than Friday, and start taking classes there right away.

“It was pretty wild and pretty quick,” Martell told The Associated Press, speaking of the whirlwind that saw him leave the Buckeyes for the Hurricanes. “But it was something I needed to get done, obviously, in a short time. And with school starting I had to get it done fast.”

Martell announced his plans to transfer to Miami early Wednesday. He redshirted as a true freshman at Ohio State in 2017, and completed 23 of 28 passes in six appearances as Dwayne Haskins’ backup for the Buckeyes this past season.

Martell’s transfer out of Ohio State came less than two weeks after former Georgia quarterback Justin Fields announced that he would be joining the Buckeyes. After arriving in South Florida, Martell said he’s only looking forward to what awaits at Miami.

“I’m just happy to be where I’m at now, focused on going and competing down here and doing my thing,” Martell said Thursday.

The next question will be how soon he gets on the field for the Hurricanes.

Martell is not leaving Ohio State as a graduate transfer, and he’ll need more than one semester to graduate from Miami. That means he’ll be applying for a waiver from the NCAA in order to play in 2019, and his attorney told the Toledo Blade on Thursday that he believes Martell’s case has merit for reasons that include the Buckeyes’ change in coaches from Urban Meyer to Ryan Day.

“There were some things that happened at Ohio State that we can potentially get some relief from the NCAA, and we’re going to try it that way,” the attorney, Travis Leach, told the newspaper. “The coaching staff turnover is an issue. There are a few things. There’s no real bright-line test that tells you 100 percent how you can get a waiver. This is a tough one, but there are some good facts on his side.”

Without the waiver or transferring as a graduate, Martell would have to sit out the 2019 season under NCAA rules.

Improving the production at quarterback is a top priority for Miami and new coach Manny Diaz this season. As a team, Miami passed for only 2,175 yards in 13 games this past season and ranked 115th out of 130 Football Bowl Subdivision teams in passing efficiency.

N’Kosi Perry, who split time with now-graduated Malik Rosier this past season, is expected back at Miami for 2019, as is redshirt freshman Jarren Williams. Martell would be competing with them for the starting job.

“Certainly, we have to get the quarterback position fixed,” Diaz said when he was hired earlier this month. “We have some young guys on our campus who have shown flashes. They have shown that they have ability. But you don’t win at the University of Miami with flashes, and you don’t win at the University of Miami with potential. You have to perform.”

Martell was a five-star recruit out of Bishop Gorman High in Las Vegas, where he went 43-0 as a starter. The move to Miami will reunite Martell with two of his Bishop Gorman teammates — Brevin Jordan is a starting tight end for the Hurricanes, and safety Bubba Bolden is transferring in from USC.

The ties to Miami run deeper than just through Jordan and Bolden, Martell said.

“I know a bunch of guys on the team through recruiting and camps and high school and staying in touch,” Martell said. “That was a big part of this for me, my relationships with the guys. And obviously my teammates, one that’s here and one that will be here. So I’m excited for sure.”

More AP college football: https://apnews.com/tag/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

Ohio film commissions seeking bigger production incentives

Saturday, January 19

CLEVELAND (AP) — The film commissions of Cleveland and Cincinnati are asking Ohio to increase the annual amount of tax incentives to draw more film productions to the state.

Ivan Schwarz, head of the Greater Cleveland Film Commission, and Kristen Schlotman, leader of Film Cincinnati, said recently they want Ohio to raise the cap on incentives for film productions from $40 million to $100 million annually, according to Cleveland.com.

Schwarz would like to see the credit expanded to Ohio productions of Broadway shows. Ohio currently provides incentives only to film and television productions.

State Sen. Kurt Schuring, a Canton Republican and a champion of the film incentives, says he plans to introduce an amendment to expand the credits to theatrical work. The credit would apply to productions and performances of shows heading to Broadway, coming from Broadway, or shows embarking on national tours.

“They love Ohio, because of the demographics,” Schuring said after meeting with Broadway producers.

A Cleveland State University economic impact study showed that every $1 in incentives contributed $2.01 to the state’s economy.

The Greater Cleveland Film Commission has helped bring production work to northeast Ohio for “The Avengers,” ”White Boy Rick,” ”My Friend Dahmer,” ”Native Son” and numerous other films. Filmmakers spent about $90 million in Greater Cleveland last year and employed more than 50,000 people part-time, Schwarz said.

Schuring said he wants to give priority to those productions that most help the state’s economy. Ohio currently accepts the first qualified applicants until the cap runs out, which happened two weeks into the current fiscal year.

There won’t be a proposal to increase the annual incentive cap until Republican Gov. Mike DeWine unveils a budget proposal for 2019, Schuring said.

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

Ohio Health Department investigates doctor for deaths

Saturday, January 19

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The state Department of Health is investigating a doctor accused of ordering potentially fatal doses of the powerful painkiller fentanyl for 27 gravely ill patients who died at an Ohio hospital system.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that the Health Department is investigating Dr. William Husel, a former Columbus-based Mount Carmel Health System physician, on behalf of the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The Franklin County Prosecutor’s Office and Columbus police also are investigating the Husel, who served as an intensive care physician for Mount Carmel.

The hospital system has placed six pharmacists and 14 nurses on administrative leave but hasn’t explained the delay in firing Husel on Dec. 5 after being told about his prescribing practices more than a month earlier.

Husel’s attorneys haven’t commented about the accusations.

Information from: The Columbus Dispatch, http://www.dispatch.com

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: SYMPHONY FOR OUR WORLD COMES TO THE OHIO THEATRE MAY 19

Tickets On Sale Now

National Geographic and Jason Michael Paul Entertainment, Inc., announced an all-new tour for National Geographic: Symphony for Our World, which will perform in Columbus on Sunday, May 19, at the Ohio Theatre. Symphony for Our World combines stunning National Geographic natural history footage with an original symphony and theme created by Emmy- and BAFTA-nominated Bleeding Fingers Music. Featuring composers Austin Fray and Andrew Christie, the show brings audiences a breathtaking musical journey coupled with some of the world’s most incredible wildlife spectacles. Performed by the Columbus Symphony and Columbus Symphony Chorus, this 90-minute, live experience takes audiences from the depths of the sea, up coastlines, over mountains, and soaring into the sky.

CAPA presents National Geographic: Symphony for Our World at the Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.) on Sunday, May 19, at 5pm. Tickets are $58.50-$98.50 and can be purchased in person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000.

The inspiring 90-minute, live orchestral performance uses groundbreaking imagery and storytelling from over 130 years of National Geographic history matched in perfect synchronization with an orchestra and choir. The show is based on the national television broadcast of “Symphony for Our World,” an hour-long special that premiered globally earlier this year in 140 countries, commercial-free, on Nat Geo WILD.

Driven by a five-part composition, Symphony for Our World pairs artistry with science as it brings viewers from the depths of the sea, up coastlines, ontoland, through mountains, and into the sky. Each environment will be accompanied by a different orchestral movement, resulting in a powerful musical tribute to the beauty and wonders of our wild world.

“National Geographic has inspired generations to explore, understand, and protect our world. Bringing this type of storytelling to life in a symphony is an incredible honor,” said Jason Michael Paul, president of Jason Michael Paul Entertainment, Inc. “We’re bringing together everything I’ve learned from over 20 years in music production with National Geographic to create something truly special.”

“Symphony for Our World has been thrilling audiences worldwide since it premiered last Earth Day,” said Gary Knell, chairman of National Geographic Partners. “The show embodies our commitment to inspire people to care about the planet, now. We are happy to be bringing it to audiences in North America. Our partner, Jason Michael Paul Entertainment, Inc., has done a phenomenal job bringing National Geographic’s 130 years of storytelling to life in a new, incredibly moving format that enables audiences to better understand the world and their place in it.”

For more information, tour dates and tickets, visit www.natgeo-symphony.com. Additional updates are available on Twitter and Facebook.

www.NatGeo-Symphony.com

Symphony for Our World Video Trailer

CALENDAR LISTING

CAPA presents NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: SYMPHONY FOR OUR WORLD

Sunday, May 19, 5pm

Ohio Theatre (39 E. State St.)

Symphony for Our World combines stunning National Geographic natural history footage with an original symphony in a breathtaking musical journey through some of the world’s most incredible wildlife spectacles. Performed by the Columbus Symphony and Columbus Symphony Chorus, this 90-minute, live experience takes audiences from the depths of the sea, up coastlines, over mountains, and soaring into the sky. Tickets are $58.50-$98.50 and can be purchased in person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.), online at www.capa.com, or by phone at (614) 469-0939 or (800) 745-3000. www.capa.com

About Jason Michael Paul Entertainment

A pioneer and leader in the live symphonic concert industry, Jason Michael Paul Entertainment, Inc. has been responsible for producing world-renowned concerts including events for The Three Tenors, Luciano Pavarotti, Dear Friends ~ Music from FINAL FANTASY, More Friends ~ Music from FINAL FANTASY, PLAY! A Video Game Symphony, rePLAY: Symphony of Heroes, The Legend of Zelda- 25th Anniversary Concerts and The Legend of Zelda:Symphony of the Goddesses. For more information, please visit https://jmpent.com.

About National Geographic Partners LLC

National Geographic Partners LLC (NGP), a joint venture between National Geographic and 21st Century Fox, is committed to bringing the world premium science, adventure and exploration content across an unrivaled portfolio of media assets. NGP combines the global National Geographic television channels (National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo MUNDO, Nat Geo PEOPLE) with National Geographic’s media and consumer-oriented assets, including National Geographic magazines; National Geographic studios; related digital and social media platforms; books; maps; children’s media; and ancillary activities that include travel, global experiences and events, archival sales, licensing and e-commerce businesses. Furthering knowledge and understanding of our world has been the core purpose of National Geographic for 130 years, and now we are committed to going deeper, pushing boundaries, going further for our consumers … and reaching millions of people around the world in 172 countries and 43 languages every month as we do it. NGP returns 27 percent of our proceeds to the nonprofit National Geographic Society to fund work in the areas of science, exploration, conservation and education. Visit natgeotv.comor nationalgeographic.com for more information, or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn and Pinterest.

About Bleeding Fingers Music

Emmy- and BAFTA-nominated Bleeding Fingers Music has assembled an exceptional and sonically diverse roster of composers to create superlative original film and television scores.Co-founded by Hans Zimmer, Extreme Music CEO Russell Emanuel, Steven Kofsky and SonyATV, the company’s core belief is that collaboration breeds innovation and working in an environment where the gifted are empowered to be adventurous, experimental and creatively generous results in extraordinary music. Our 20 state-of-the-art studios based on Zimmer’s world-renowned campus and our best-in-class production team allow us the ability to produce music at the very highest standard. Bleeding Fingers has created original music for productions including Fox’s The Simpsons, BBC’s Blue Planet II, Planet Earth II, and Big Cats, National Geographic’s Diana: In Her Own Words and Challenger Disaster: Lost Tapes, Sony’s Snatch (TV),Netflix’s original Dope, History Channel’s Mountain Men and BBC America’s Superfly.

About Innovation Arts & Entertainment

Innovation Arts & Entertainment is a 17-year-old boutique, live entertainment producer based in Chicago, IL. IAE prides itself in producing events within the domain of IntelligentEntertainment, producing unique live experiences that result in expanding the knowledge and worldview of audiences that participate. In the last five years alone, IAE has produced tours for Hillary Clinton, Anthony Bourdain, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, David Sedaris, and Chris and Martin Kratt from PBS. In addition to Together Live 2018, other current touring projects include the North American Tour of Harry Potter In Concert, National Geographic’s Symphony for Our World, David Sedaris’ 2018 and 2019 tours, and five new projects in development. At IAE, we relish the opportunity to use the power of art, entertainment, information, and education in such a way that our audiences are changed for the better.

The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, education excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. CAPA alsoappreciates the generous support of the Barbara B. Coons and Robert Bartels Funds of The Columbus Foundation and the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

About CAPA

Owner/operator of downtown Columbus’ magnificent historic theatres (Ohio Theatre, Palace Theatre, Southern Theatre) and manager of the Riffe Center Theatre Complex, LincolnTheatre, Drexel Theatre, Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts (New Albany, OH), and the Shubert Theatre (New Haven, CT), CAPA is a non-profit, award-winning presenter of national and international performing arts and entertainment. For more information, visit www.capa.com.

Melissa Martin

Self-syndicated Columnist

A rogue doctor of death in Ohio

The airwaves are buzzing with the story about an Ohio hospital and doctor. And deceased patients. Death by fentanyl. Incompetence or negligence? Intentional to reduce prolonged suffering? Mercy killings? Euthanasia is not legal in the United States.

Physician-assisted death is not legal in Ohio. However, Ohio State Senator Charleta Tavares (D-Columbus) introduced SB 249, Ohio Aid in Dying Act, on January 24, 2018, with co-sponsors Ohio State Senators Joseph Schiavoni (D-33) and Kenny Yuko (D-25). If enacted, the Act will allow qualified terminally ill, dying Ohio residents to legally obtain medications to end their suffering at the end of life. On 3/21/18, SB 249 was referred to Committee Health, Human Services and Medicaid. www.legislature.ohio.gov/.

“Mount Carmel recently reported to authorities the findings of an internal investigation that determined a Mount Carmel doctor who provided intensive care ordered significantly excessive and potentially fatal doses of pain medication for at least 27 patients who were near death. These patients’ families had requested that all life-saving measures be stopped, yet the amount of medicine the doctor ordered was more than what was needed to provide comfort,” according to information on the Mount Carmel website. www.mountcarmelhealth.com/about-us/facts/.

According a 2019 article in the Columbus Dispatch, “The Ohio Department of Health has begun an investigation into a Mount Carmel doctor accused of ordering potentially fatal doses of painkiller for 27 near-death hospital patients, all of whom have died. Mount Carmel officials fired the doctor and placed 20 pharmacists and nurses on leave while they look into the cases.”

“Eighteen months ago, Mount Carmel began work to stop preventable medical errors — work that puts systems into place to make the care we provide highly reliable and consistent,” is another statement on the Mount Carmel website.

Why is a policy to prevent medical errors not ongoing? Why eighteen months ago? Why not prior to opening the hospital for business? It appears that whistle-blowing employees came forth with the allegations. When did the intentional ending of a patient’s life by a physician become ‘a medical error’?

Donald Harvey, a nurse’s aide, dubbed “the Angle of Death” pleaded guilty in 1987 to killing 55 patients in Cincinnati and Kentucky hospitals. Many of his victims were chronically ill patients. He claimed he was ending their suffering. “Harvey told a newspaper after he pleaded guilty to avoid the death penalty that he liked the control of determining who lived and died. Former Hamilton County Prosecutor Arthur Ney Jr. who prosecuted the cases in Cincinnati said Harvey was not a mercy killer,” according to a 2017 article in USA Today.

Lisa Schattinger, a nurse, founded Ohio End of Life Options in 2015. The members support a Death with Dignity law in Ohio. “The law allows a mentally competent, terminally ill adult to obtain prescription medications from his or her doctors in order to hasten his or her imminent death.” This law exists in Oregon, Washington, Vermont, California, Colorado, Hawaii, and Washington D.C. www.ohiooptions.org.

Dr. Jack Kevorkian, a medical pathologist, was arrested, tried in a court of law, and convicted of physician-assisted suicide. According to a 2011 article in the New York Times, “The American Medical Association in 1995 called him “a reckless instrument of death” who “poses a great threat to the public.”

The phrase ‘physician-assisted suicide’ has been replaced by ‘death with dignity.’ Loaded language is a persuasive technique used to heighten emotion, gain support, and sway voters. And loaded phrases are changed to make horrific acts more palatable to the public.

Do you support or oppose a Death with Dignity law in Ohio for the terminally ill?

Do you support or oppose the alleged acts of a rogue physician to end the suffering of terminally ill patients by injecting lethal doses of fentanyl at Mount Carmel hospital in Columbus, Ohio?

Melissa Martin, Ph.D., is an author, columnist, educator, and therapist. She lives in Southern Ohio. www.melissamartinchildrensauthor.com.

The Conversation

Razor burned: Why Gillette’s campaign against toxic masculinity missed the mark

January 18, 2019

Author: Alan Abitbol, Assistant Professor of Communication, University of Dayton

Disclosure statement: Alan Abitbol does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners: University Of Dayton provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

Gillette has launched a new marketing campaign, “The Best Men Can Be,” with an ad that has gone viral.

The ad begins by depicting boys bullying other boys, women being harassed and cat-called, and a group of men excusing all of it as “boys will be boys.” Gillette then asks if this is “the best a man can get.” The rest of the ad portrays men pushing back against other men’s bad behavior.

It’s been polarizing, to say the least.

On one side, the campaign is being praised for tackling masculine stereotypes and challenging men to be better.

On the other side, some are saying that Gillette risks turning off customers who think the brand is shamelessly capitalizing on the #MeToo movement and practicing “leftist” politics. There are already calls for the brand to be boycotted.

So why has this ad caused such a large divide?

In my research on companies’ use of pro-social messages, backlash usually arises due to some combination of the cause itself, a poor fit between the brand and the cause, and suspicion of the company’s true motives.

An authentic pairing matters

Companies have backed various social issues for decades. Marriott, for example, organized fundraisers for the March of Dimes, a nonprofit organization that works to improve the health of mothers and babies, in the 1970s.

Today, customers expect companies to stand for something. According to a 2018 Edelman Earned Brand report, nearly two-thirds of consumers believe companies should take a stand on social or political issues.

However, studies have shown that, in order for the corporate activism to be warmly received, the cause usually needs to be connected to the company’s product line or brand in some way.

This can happen when a company and its supported cause share similar values, such as Disney’s partnership with Make-a-Wish for its “Share Your Ears” campaign. Both organizations strive to bring joy to children. Or it can happen when a company backs a cause that’s aligned with its brand – think Nike’s “Find Your Greatness” campaign, which works to curtail teenage obesity through fitness.

If the pairing doesn’t appear authentic, consumers might wonder if the company is just trying to make a profit versus truly championing the cause. For example, the public questioned Pepsi’s attempt to address racial tensions with its 2017 Kendall Jenner ad, in part because the pairing seemed so disingenuous: What does a can of Pepsi have to do with racial issues and police brutality?

It’s not the message or the cause – it’s the delivery

The issue with the Gillette ad is not that it is supporting a cause, or even that Gillette is supporting the particular cause of toxic masculinity.

In fact, Gillette is not the only male-centric brand to have recently challenged masculine stereotypes. Just for Men launched its “Better Man” campaign in October 2018, which encourages men to be more compassionate and caring. In 2014, Dove Men+Care launched its “Care Makes a Man Stronger” campaign to explore the different ways men define masculinity.

Gillette, however, takes a more aggressive approach.

The ad immediately sets the tone with a heated issue, beginning with a slew of stories about the #MeToo movement. It goes on to discuss a host of problems – bullying, harassment, sexism – tied to toxic masculinity. About halfway through, Gillette calls for men to abandon dated models of masculinity and fight against the stereotype. It ends by galvanizing an entire generation with the powerful line “because the boys watching today will be the men of tomorrow.”

While the ad and its message are poignant, its delivery is off: It compels an entire consumer base to back the #MeToo movement and to positively associate its brand with that cause.

But people don’t like to be told what to do; for this same reason, ads rarely insist outright that people buy their product. Instead, they’ll show how a product can be a part of people’s lives, and might even improve them.

So why, a viewer might ask, would a company feel emboldened enough to imply that its customer base needs to do more on behalf of a particular cause?

It should be noted that Gillette seems to be genuinely supporting the cause. The company is donating US $1 million to nonprofits who support positive forms of masculinity.

But viewers might be questioning the company’s motives because the ad doesn’t directly tie the cause to what the brand is known for: shaving and grooming.

Should that matter? Surprisingly, it does.

In a study I conducted about how consumers perceive messages of female empowerment, showcasing the product – and tying the product to the message – seemed to resonate best.

For example, a GMC campaign showing women using Dodge Ram trucks to do various activities, from working on a ranch to picking up kids from school, was well-received. But a Verizon commercial telling girls to embrace science didn’t resonate as well, because the only clue that it was an ad for Verizon was a Verizon logo at the end.

Gillette is taking a stand, as many companies are doing.

They simply didn’t properly execute the message.

FILE – In this Sept. 22, 2018, file photo, Ohio State quarterback Tate Martell runs against Tulane during an NCAA college football game in Columbus, Ohio. Martell says he is transferring from Ohio State to Miami. Martell announced on Twitter early Wednesday, Jan. 16: “I’m a Hurricane.” Martell had entered his name into the NCAA transfer portal last week and was free to be approached by schools about a potential transfer. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
https://www.sunburynews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2019/01/web1_122156100-997a0f7cb01b4c288f9ce589f521506f.jpgFILE – In this Sept. 22, 2018, file photo, Ohio State quarterback Tate Martell runs against Tulane during an NCAA college football game in Columbus, Ohio. Martell says he is transferring from Ohio State to Miami. Martell announced on Twitter early Wednesday, Jan. 16: “I’m a Hurricane.” Martell had entered his name into the NCAA transfer portal last week and was free to be approached by schools about a potential transfer. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
NEWS & VIEWS

Staff & Wire Reports